Is Publishing Becoming a Minimum Wage Trade

first_imgThe memo received by BNP Media staffers this week alerting them to 25 percent salary cuts for the foreseeable future includes a line that jumps off the page almost as much as that “25 percent” figure: “Minimum wage will be the floor for this reduction.”It’s a line that assures employees the company won’t be cutting below minimum wage (which of course, would be illegal), and only applies to those support positions that may be hovering around minimum wage after the 25 percent cuts. But still, are things so bad that we have to be assured now that salaries won’t be cut to minimum wage? Salary cuts usually start at the top and the Henderson family (who owns BNP) have taken theirs as well. However, an associate editor making $40,000 who is hit with a 25 percent salary cut is suddenly making $30,000. Forget trying to live on that in publishing capitals like New York City-that’s a tough hit anywhere (BNP is based near Detroit).As publishers continue to make cuts to keep their businesses alive, they need to be mindful of labor rules and regulations in their state, particularly with employees below a certain salary level. As Southern Breeze editor Mark Newman noted in FOLIO:’s March issue, many high level employees (particularly editors) need to “stop being figureheads and do some work.” But for those entry and associate level employees, for whom the historic trade-off has always been “low pay but great experience,” the returns are getting harder to justify.  The company leaders who impose these cuts will need to balance their contribution margins against the eventual pushback: The unwillingness of their teams to tolerate major pay cuts even as they’re being asked to do significantly more work. It’s a dangerously narrow line to walk.last_img read more

Dayton Development Coalition Ohio Partnership Enhances Support for WrightPatt

first_imgThe P4 Partnership Program, a collaboration among the Dayton Development Coalition, several Ohio agencies and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, has shaved operating costs for the Air Force at the same time it has improved support for the installation.The partnership brought together the Coalition, the governor’s office, the governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation, Ohio Administrative Services, the Ohio Board of Regents, the Ohio Department of Veteran’s Affairs, JobsOhio and Sinclair Community College (SCC). The partners have focused on projects that provide education, job training and employment search opportunities; leverage resources to reduce costs on large commodity purchases; and permit the mutually beneficial use of emergency response facilities and equipment, and recreation facilities.To provide job training and networking opportunities, the partnership launched “Ohio Means Internships,” a website that promotes internships at Wright-Patterson and throughout the state. The installation and the state are working together to help veterans take advantage of resources offered by universities as well. On base, Wright-Patterson’s transition assistance manager helps transitioning members connect easily with “Ohio Means Veterans Jobs,” a free online job search resource, thanks to assistance from the governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation.Wright-Patterson and SCC also have teamed up to offer a hands-on, site-specific education exchange program. Last year, 2,000 students in SCC’s Fire Protection Technology program used the base’s fire department, burn tower and equipment to practice firefighting techniques. In return, SCC provided professional development training to base employees and hazard waste and emergency response training to base fire department personnel. The wholesale cost of the exchange was $129,000, but the base avoided more than $464,400 in costs it would have incurred to meet federal regulations. SCC realized savings of $178,400 over five years from this project.The P4 Partnership Program is helping Wright-Patterson to cut costs in other ways. The base used the state’s managed services program to obtain low-cost licenses for specialized radios that are used by first responders and public safety personnel. The base also is using the state’s cooperative purchase program to save up to 30 percent on commodity purchases.By leveraging shared resources to meet individual and collective goals, Wright-Patterson, the Dayton Development Coalition and the state of Ohio have developed a broad, mutually beneficial and cost-effective partnership. Its success has prompted the secretary of the Air Force to ask other installations to replicate it. For their initiative to work hand-in-glove with the base on a variety of projects, the Dayton Development Coalition in partnership with the state of Ohio earned ADC’s Community Excellence Award. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Equal Pay Day Women in tech are still making less than men

first_img Tags Tech Industry 15 Commentscenter_img Tuesday is Equal Pay Day. Getty Images While Equal Pay Day might sound like some kind of holiday, it’s actually a stark reminder that men and women don’t always get paid equal money for equal work.In fact, when looking at part-time and full-time workers in the US, women earned about 85 percent of what men did in 2018, according to data released in March from the Pew Research Center.The annual marker, which falls on Tuesday this year, symbolizes how far into this year women would have to work in order to have earned as much as men did in the previous year. Usually around Equal Pay Day, there’s a new offering of research from various sources shedding light on how and why that is. In the tech industry— which regularly grapples with numbers that show it’s predominantly made up of white men— disparity in pay is shrinking, but slowly. Glassdoor, a site that corrals employment information on companies, looked at more than a half million salary reports and found that at the pace we’re going, it’s going to take 51 years to close the pay gap.  In its March report, called Progress on the Gender Pay Gap: 2019, Glassdoor found the adjusted pay gap in tech is 5.4 percent, above the national average of 4.9 percent. The adjusted pay gap incorporates factors such as experience and education when comparing the earnings of men and women. While it’s improving, the gap has closed just 0.5 percentage point since 2016.”It’s not a surprise that there’s still a fairly large gap when you consider the fact that most of the highest paying jobs are still predominantly male,” said Daniel Zhao, a senior economist who worked on the report.Tech recruiting platform Hired also put out a report last week called The State of Wage Inequality in the Workplace, and found that when men are offered the same job role women, they’re offered higher salaries 60 percent of the time. The report also found that in the tech industry, white and Asian women made 97 cents for every dollar white and Asian men made. The amount dropped for black (89 cents) and and Hispanic women (91 cents).Meanwhile, not all tech workers are convinced there’s a problem. The reported stated that “64% of female survey respondents believe a racial wage gap exists due to racial identity, while 54% of men believe it exists.”Over the years, some companies have set goals to close their pay gaps. Tech companies like Salesforce, Intel and PayPal have all said they’ve closed their pay gaps. “There’s a cultural phenomenon where women are paid less,” Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff told 60 Minutes in April 2018, when recounting how the company conducted an audit to correct its pay imbalance. (Editor’s note: 60 Minutes is owned by CNET’s parent company, CBS.)One reason progress in tech might be slow, Zhao said, is because there are so few women in the field to start with. He said that industries making quicker progress, like the nonprofit world, tend to be already more gender-balanced.It isn’t just money that women are missing out on. “People spend a third of their lives at their jobs,” Zhao said, “a lot of their overall happiness and satisfaction with life is tied up into how they feel about their job… reducing the amount of discrimination and stress is really important.”  Share your voicelast_img read more