Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato has a 108piece grille that moves

first_img null Aston Martin DBS Superleggera has gorgeous looks and… Now playing: Watch this: Enlarge ImageLeave it to Aston Martin and Zagato to create a car with a grille that literally flows when the vehicle is started up. Aston Martin Aston Martin and design house Zagato have a six-decade-long relationship, combining forces to create some of the most stunning vehicles on the road. As part of Zagato’s 100th birthday, Aston Martin will offer up 19 examples of the new DBS GT Zagato, and the automaker is finally ready to show off its production-ready shape and offer up a bit more information about what to expect.Aston Martin on Tuesday unveiled a small handful of pictures that show the production form of the DBS GT Zagato alongside its old-school sibling, the DB4 GT Zagato Continuation. Starting with a DBS Superleggera, the body picks up some wild new styling, including a full carbon roof that eliminates the rear glass, as well as some stunning taillights, new flourishes on the sides and a curvaceous front end.To accommodate the roof, Aston Martin created a camera-based rearview mirror that still allows the driver to see behind the vehicle without any rear windshield. Consider it like those mass-market mirrors that let you swap between normal and camera-based viewing, only the former is impossible because there actually isn’t any rear glass at all. If you think that’s wild, take a look at the grille. It looks intricate, sure, but it’s even crazier than you might think. The grille comprises 108 pieces of diamond-shaped carbon fiber. When the car is off, the grille looks sealed up with a flush appearance, but upon starting the car, those pieces “flutter into life,” as Aston puts it, physically opening up to provide the car’s V12 engine with air. Good luck trying to get that repaired anywhere but the dealership.At a cost of roughly $8 million, the grille had damn well better mimic a living being. But then again, that price tag doesn’t just include one car. DBS GT Zagato buyers also receive a DB4 GT Zagato Continuation model, a handbuilt coupe finished in the same hue as the original DB4 GT Zagato cars that were built in the 1960s. All of a sudden, paying $8 million for two utterly stunning small-batch creations doesn’t sound so obscene.aston-dbs-gt-zagato-002Enlarge ImageThe rear end of the DBS GT Zagato is breathtaking, and not just because it lacks a rear windshield. Aston Martin Aston Martin Preview • 2019 Aston Martin DBS Superleggera: Beast mode More about 2019 Aston Martin DBS Superleggera 2020 Hyundai Sonata first drive: An attractive and compelling midsize sedan Exotic Cars Superluxury Cars Performance Cars Coupescenter_img 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Share your voice 0 More From Roadshow 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Tags 8:32last_img read more

UPDATE California Gunmans Wife Found Dead Death Toll Climbs To 5

first_img Share Photo via Twitter Victor StoddardTehama County Assistant Sheriff Phil Johnston said the shooter was facing charges of assaulting one of the feuding neighbors in January and that she had a restraining order against him.The wife of a gunman who went on a shooting rampage in a Northern California town was found dead inside their home, authorities announced Wednesday, raising the death toll from the attack to five.Investigators discovered the body of Kevin Janson Neal’s wife hidden under the floor with several gunshot wounds. They believe her slaying was the start of the rampage, said Tehama County Assistant Sheriff Phil Johnston.Neal shot and killed four other people and wounded 10 at different locations around the rural community of Rancho Tehama Reserve. Police later shot and killed him.At the time of the attack, the gunman was out on bail after he was charged with stabbing a neighbor. Court records also show that Neal was barred in February from having guns after the assault.Neighbors had complained about him firing hundreds of rounds from his house, and the assistant sheriff acknowledged officers had visited the home on several occasions.“Every time we responded, we would try to make contact with Mr. Neal,” Johnston said. “He was not law enforcement friendly. He would not come to the door. His house was arranged in a manner where we couldn’t detect him being there.”“We can’t anticipate what people are going to do. We don’t have a crystal ball,” Johnston said.Yet Neal was free and able to use a semi-automatic rifle and two handguns Tuesday to shoot 14 people, including at an elementary school, before he died in the shootout with police.Court records obtained by The Associated Press show that Neal surrendered his weapons as required by law in February, but Johnston said they recovered two illegally made semi-automatic rifles and two handguns, registered in someone else’s name.At a news conference Wednesday, Johnston said that Neal’s rampage lasted about 25 minutes, correcting an earlier estimate that it went on for 45 minutes.Neal shot two of his neighbors in an apparent act of revenge before he went looking for random victims.Authorities believe his wife was killed Monday.“We are confident that he murdered her,” Johnston said.______________The gunman behind a rampage in Northern California was out on bail charged with stabbing a neighbor, others had complained about him firing hundreds of rounds from his house, and he had been the subject of a domestic violence call the day before the attack.Yet Kevin Neal was free and able to use a semi-automatic rifle and two handguns Tuesday to shoot 14 people, killing four, in seven different locations across his rural community, including an elementary school, before he died in a shootout with police.It’s not yet clear what the terms of Neal’s bail were, and whether he would have been allowed to possess and fire the weapons on his property at the end of a dirt road in Rancho Tehama Reserve. Nor did sheriff’s officials give details on the domestic violence call.But his many contacts with authorities raised questions of why he was out of custody and able to go on the 45-minute rampage that began with the killing of two neighbors in an apparent act of revenge before he went looking for random victims.Cristal Caravez and her father live across a ravine from the roadway where the gunman and his first victims lived.She said they and others heard constant gunfire from the area of the gunman’s house, but couldn’t say for sure it was him firing.“You could hear the yelling. He’d go off the hinges,” she said. The shooting, “it would be during the day, during the night, I mean, it didn’t matter.”She and her father, who is president of the homeowners association, said neighbors would complain to the sheriff’s department, which referred the complaints back to the homeowners association.“The sheriff wouldn’t do anything about it,” said Juan Caravez.The gunman’s sister, Sheridan Orr, said her brother had struggled with mental illness throughout his life and at times had a violent temper.She said Neal had “no business” owning firearms.Tehama County Assistant Sheriff Phil Johnston said the shooter was facing charges of assaulting one of the feuding neighbors in January and that she had a restraining order against him.Johnston did not comment on the shooter’s access to firearms.Johnston declined to identify the shooter until his relatives were notified, but he confirmed the gunman was charged with assault in January and had a restraining order placed against him. The district attorney, Gregg Cohen, told the Sacramento Bee he is prosecuting a man named Kevin Neal in that case.Neal’s mother told The Associated Press her son, who was a marijuana grower, was in a long-running dispute with neighbors he believed were cooking methamphetamine.The mother, who spoke on condition she be named only as Anne because she fears for her safety, lives in Raleigh, North Carolina, where she raised Neal. She said she posted his $160,000 bail and spent $10,000 on a lawyer after he was arrested in January for stabbing a neighbor. Neal’s mother said the neighbor was slightly cut after Neal grabbed a steak knife out of the hand of the neighbor who was threatening him with it.She wept as she told The Associated Press she spoke to Neal on the phone on Monday.“Mom it’s all over now,” she said he told her. “I have done everything I could do and I am fighting against everyone who lives in this area.”She said Neal apologized to her during their brief conversation, she thought for all the money she had spent on him, saying he was “on a cliff” and the people around him were trying to “execute” him.“I think the motive of getting even with his neighbors and when it went that far — he just went on a rampage,” Johnston said.Police said surveillance video shows the shooter unsuccessfully trying to enter a nearby elementary school after quick-thinking staff members locked the outside doors and barricaded themselves inside when they heard gunshots.Johnston said the gunman spent about six minutes shooting into Rancho Tehama Elementary School before driving off to continue shooting elsewhere. Johnston said one student was shot but is expected to survive.He said the 45-minute rampage ended when a patrol car rammed the stolen vehicle the shooter was driving and killed him in a shootout.Johnston said officials received multiple 911 calls about gunfire at an intersection of two dirt roads. Minutes later, more calls reporting shots flooded in from different locations, including the school.Witnesses reported hearing gunshots and children screaming at the school, which has one class of students from kindergarten through fifth grade.The shootings occurred in the rural community of Rancho Tehama Reserve, a homeowners association in a sparsely populated area of rolling oak woodlands dotted with grazing cattle about 130 miles north of Sacramento.Many there live in poverty, but others are better off.“It’s not a bad community at all,” said Harry Garcia, who was minding his parents’ convenience store La Fortuna Market. “Some people keep their properties nice- some don’t. They rough it out here. Some go with minimum stuff. Some don’t even have power out here.”___Elias reported from San Francisco. Associated Press writers Jocelyn Gecker, Janie Har and Olga Rodriguez in San Francisco, Michael Balsamo in Los Angeles and researcher Rhonda Shafner in New York also contributed to this story.last_img read more