December 29 2008 On 91508 we reported on a long

first_imgDecember 29, 2008 On 9/15/08 we reported on a long-standing mystery that has finally been solved. Alum from the late 1970’s and early 1980’s will remember this beautiful painting. It was on display on the back wall of the original Arcosanti café for many years. On 9/15/08 we reported on a long-standing mystery that has finally been solved. Alum from the late 1970’s and early 1980’s will remember this beautiful painting. It was on display on the back wall of the original Arcosanti café for many years. [Photo & text: sa] The painting was done by artist and alumna Paula Wittner, commissioned in 1977 by alum Russ Adams and it disappeared in the mid 1980’s. Apparently it was stored in Phoenix and the storage company had gone out of business. The painting reappeared in Prescott, at Drake Station Trading Company. Their owners, trying to trace the origin of the painting, got in touch with Paula Wittner just recently. [Photo & text: sa] This prompted Russ Adams and Paula to visit the new owners and Russ Adams bought the painting back. It has been stored in the Arcosanti Soleri Archives, and now facilities manager Randall Schultz built a crate to ship the beautiful painting back to Russ Adams. [Randall Schultz and Cliff Hersted] [Photo & text: sa]last_img read more

Remote monitoring of implanted defibrillators in heart failure patients prevents hospitalizations

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 18 2019Remote monitoring keeps heart failure patients out of hospital, according to late-breaking findings from the RESULT trial presented today at EHRA 2019, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress. The set-up is so effective that it has won reimbursement from the national health system.Study author Dr Mateusz Tajstra, of the Silesian Centre of Heart Disease, Zabrze, Poland, said: “The trial showed that remote monitoring of implanted defibrillators in patients with heart failure leads to prompt treatment when a problem occurs and prevents hospital admissions.”Around 1-2% of adults in developed countries have heart failure, a clinical syndrome characterized by breathlessness, ankle swelling, and fatigue. A high proportion of deaths in these patients, especially those with milder symptoms, occur suddenly due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) or cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D) are recommended for some patients to correct potentially lethal arrhythmias and reduce the risk of sudden death.The number of heart failure patients with implanted devices is growing, and hospitalizations and outpatient appointments are common. This trial examined whether remote monitoring of the devices reduces the rate of hospitalization and death.A total of 600 heart failure patients with an ICD or CRT-D were randomly allocated to remote monitoring or standard care with face-to-face appointments. During the subsequent 12 months, the researchers recorded deaths from any cause and hospitalizations for cardiovascular reasons (the composite primary endpoint).The rate of the primary endpoint was significantly lower in the remote monitoring group (39.5%) compared to the standard care group (48.5%; p=0.032). When the researchers looked at the components of the endpoint separately, they found that the rate of all-cause mortality was similar between groups (6% versus 6%; p=0.9), whereas the hospitalization rate for cardiovascular causes rate was significantly lower in the remote arm (37.1%) compared to the standard arm (45.5%; p=0.045).Related StoriesImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeDr Tajstra said: “The death rate may have been similar between groups because the trial was not powered to show differences in survival alone.””It is important to stress that remote monitoring is not effective as a plug and play gadget,” he continued. “It will only be successful with a specified workflow to act on data retrieved from the devices, performed by a dedicated team.”In this study, remote monitoring was conducted from an office in the hospital, open for ten hours daily Monday to Friday, with three levels of staff. Two electrophysiology nurses checked device transmissions, contacted patients if further information was needed, and decided the course of action. Cardiology residents investigated suspected arrhythmias or device malfunctions and took action if indicated. A clinical cardiologist and electrophysiologist were available for difficult clinical situations.”Our pragmatic approach facilitated rapid clinical reactions to data from the devices,” said Dr Tajstra. “This prevented heart failure decompensation, where symptoms suddenly get worse and patients are often hospitalized. Even though there is no reimbursement for remote monitoring in Poland, our results have convinced the health authorities to pay for this service.” Source:https://www.escardio.org/The-ESC/Press-Office/Press-releases/Remote-monitoring-keeps-heart-failure-patients-out-of-hospitallast_img read more

Role of memories in people with and without hoarding problems

first_img The Bath team is currently leading work to explore the potential of immersive VR technologies in modelling treasured items, giving those with hoarding tendencies a form of exposure therapy and the opportunity to discard items in a virtual world. We can all relate to the experience of being flooded with positive memories when we hold valued possessions in our hands. However, our findings suggest that it’s the way in which we respond to these object-related memories that dictates whether we hold onto an object or let it go. The typical population appears to be able to set aside these memories, presumably to ease the task of discarding the objects, and so manage to avoid the accumulation of clutter. The hoarding participants enjoyed the positive memories but reported that they got in the way of their attempts to discard objects.” Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 20 2019New research conducted at the University of Bath has demonstrated important differences in how people with and without hoarding problems discard objects and the role their memories play.It was already known that hoarding behavior is driven by a strong emotional connection with objects. But the new experimental findings, published online in the journal Behavior Therapy, show that for people who hoard this connection may be in part attributable to the vivid, positive memories associated with those objects.In essence, for those with hoarding problems, individual items become an extension of a given memory, becoming a barrier to decluttering and hence exacerbating an individual’s problems. Drawing on the new findings, the team behind the study hope that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for hoarding might be enhanced by training individuals to respond differently to those memories.Hoarding describes a problem where individuals have considerable difficulty letting go of possessions. Consequently, rooms can become so cluttered over time that living spaces becomes no longer usable for their intended purpose.According to the Royal College of Psychiatrists, hoarding can be a mental health problem in its own right (known as ‘hoarding disorder’). The clutter associated with hoarding can have profound negative effects on the lives of people living with the problem and those around them, particularly with respect to emotional and physical well-being, health and safety, and finances. The fire risks associated with clutter are also be of particular concern.Lead researcher Dr Nick Stewart, who now works as a Clinical Psychologist at Avon & Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust, explains: “People who hoard are often offered CBT to help them understand the thoughts and feelings associated with their saving and acquiring behaviors. This approach is very beneficial for some people, but not all. Our aim is to understand better the psychological factors that drive hoarding behavior, to give us clues for how therapy for hoarding might be improved.”The researchers conducted structured interviews with 27 people with clinically-significant hoarding problems, and 28 without such difficulties (the ‘control’ group).Participants were asked to recall the memories that came to mind the last time they discarded, or tried to discard, items at home.Both groups reported positive memories while discarding possessions that they valued (which may describe most possessions in the case of people who hoard). These memories included recollections of acquiring the object, or memories of an event or person associated with the object. Crucially, the control participants (those without a hoarding problem) reported attempts to avoid this positive imagery, while the hoarding participants did not.Dr Nick Stewart, Lead Researcher: Related StoriesParticipation in local food projects may have positive effect on healthHospitals’ decision to transfer kids with mental health emergencies is based on insurance typeTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTIn the paper, the researchers have suggested ways in which this new insight could be used to enhance CBT for hoarding.Dr James Gregory, Clinical Research Tutor and Clinical Psychologist at the University of Bath, who supervised the research, said: “Where positive memories, and the mental images associated with them, are getting in the way of discarding objects, therapists could work with people to develop an alternative image to ‘compete’ with the one that’s causing difficulty. This competing image could capture the positive consequences of discarding items, for example, eating a meal with loved ones at a dinner table once it is clear of possessions.”The next step is a follow-on experimental study to see if helping people to ‘rescript’ memories in this way is helpful for enabling people to let go of objects more easily.Dr Gregory added: “While memories associated with objects can afford a sense of comfort and security to people who hoard, the resulting clutter can rob people of their quality of life.”This study is part of a wider effort at Bath to to better understand the special relationship that people have with their possessions. Ultimately we hope to use this knowledge to improve psychological support available and to enhance the wellbeing of people who hoard.”Notes on hoarding: On hoarding research at Bath: Up to 1.3 million people in the UK may have a significant hoarding problem (or develop one in the future); People with hoarding problems may keep items for sentimental reasons or because they find objects beautiful or useful. Most people with hoarding problems have a very strong emotional attachment to objects; Hoarding can become problematic for several reasons. It can take over a person’s life, making it very difficult for them to get around their house. It can also affect work performance, personal hygiene and cause relationships to suffer; Household clutter can also pose a health risk to the person and anyone who lives in or visits their house. For example, it can become a fire risk and block exits in the event of a fire, or cause trips and falls; The main treatment is cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). The therapist will help the person to understand what makes it difficult to throw things away and the reasons why the clutter has built up. This will be combined with practical tasks and a plan to work on. Source:University of BathJournal reference:Stewart, N. et al. (2019) The Role of Intrusive Imagery in Hoarding Disorder. Behavior Therapy. doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2019.04.005last_img read more

More than 936 million people have sleep apnea ResMedled analysis reveals

first_imgThe bottom line is: If you’re constantly tired or have other conditions linked to sleep apnea, it never hurts to ask your doctor about it. Don’t settle for being tired all the time. Sleep apnea is 100 percent treatable. You can improve your sleep, your mood, your relationships at work and home, your health, perhaps even other medical conditions you’re managing. But first, you have to find out.”Carlos M. Nunez Jul 10 2019More than 936 million people have obstructive sleep apnea – the disease’s first prevalence update in more than a decade – according to The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, the world’s leading journal in its field.The Lancet today published a multinational analysis by ResMed and 12 academic leaders in sleep research. The results were first presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference in San Diego.This figure is nearly 10 times greater than the World Health Organization’s 2007 estimate of more than 100 million, renewing calls for physicians to step up their efforts to screen, diagnose, and prescribe treatment for those who unknowingly suffer. More than 85 percent of sleep apnea patients are undiagnosed, meaning hundreds of millions repeatedly suffocate instead of getting healthy, restful sleep each night. This raises their risk of workplace and roadway accidents, and can contribute to other significant health problems, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, or even poor glucose control for diabetic patients. We know the risks, and now we know the size of the problem is nearly 10 times greater than previously thought. Addressing it starts with screening patients we know to be high-risk.”Carlos M. Nunez, M.D., study coauthor, ResMed’s chief medical officer Source:ResMed Why is sleep apnea mostly undiagnosed?Sufferers often don’t know they’re suffering. They’ll stop breathing for 10 seconds or more throughout the night – called an “apnea” – and repeatedly wake to breathe and prevent suffocation. They rarely remember waking, but the disruptive cycle causes chronic sleep deprivation.“Many will attribute the resulting tiredness to aging or stress,” said Nunez. “Others will mention the problem to their doctor, only to be misdiagnosed with insomnia, migraines, chronic fatigue, or other conditions. Misdiagnosis is especially common with women, since sleep apnea was long thought to be much more common in men.”Related StoriesSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsHigh sleep variability and short sleep duration predict blunted weight lossI’m a CPAP dropout: Why many lose sleep over apnea treatmentToday, women account for 40 percent of newly diagnosed sleep apnea patients.Another reason many suffer unknowingly can be blamed on cultural ideas of what constitutes good sleep.“For instance, some believe snoring may simply be a normal feature of how some people sleep, when in fact it’s one of the most important signs for the risk of having sleep apnea,” Nunez said. “With a global prevalence that approaches 1 billion people, patients and physicians need to consider the risks and ask the questions that may ultimately help them sleep and live better. This is no longer a problem that can be treated lightly or ignored.”Who is at risk for sleep apnea?More than half of all people with obesity, heart failure, stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), atrial fibrillation, or type 2 diabetes also have sleep apnea, according to leading research.Snoring is the number-one indicator of sleep apnea in men and women, though not everyone who snores has it – and not everyone who has it snores.People told they stop breathing for long periods during sleep are also at a higher risk for the disorder.last_img read more

Facebook Most users may have had public data scraped

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Facebook’s acknowledgement that most of its 2.2 billion members have probably had their personal data scraped by “malicious actors” is the latest example of the social network’s failure to protect its users’ data. Not to mention its apparent inability to even identify the problem until the company was already embroiled in scandal.CEO Mark Zuckerberg told reporters Wednesday that Facebook is shutting down a feature that let people search for Facebook users by phone number or email address. Although that was useful for people who wanted to find others on Facebook, it turns out that unscrupulous types also figured out years ago that they could use it to identify individuals and collect data off their profiles.The scrapers were at it long enough, Zuckerberg said, that “at some point during the last several years, someone has probably accessed your public information in this way.”The only way to be safe would have been for users to deliberately turn off that search feature several years ago. Facebook had it turned on by default.”I think Facebook has not been clear enough with how to use its privacy settings,” said Jamie Winterton, director of strategy for Arizona State University’s Global Security Initiative. “That, to me, was the failure.” In this June 7, 2013, file photo, the Facebook “like” symbol is on display on a sign outside the company’s headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Australian authorities say they are investigating whether Facebook breached the country’s privacy law when personal information of more than 300,000 Australian users was obtained by Cambridge Analytica, a Trump-linked political consulting firm, without their authorization. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File) The breach was a stunning admission for a company already reeling from allegations that the political data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica inappropriately accessed data on as many as 87 million Facebook users to influence elections.Over the past few weeks, the scandal has mushroomed into investigations across continents, including a probe by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. Zuckerberg himself will be questioned by Congress for the first time on Tuesday.”The FTC looked the other way for years when consumer groups told them Facebook was violating its 2011 deal to better protect its users. But now the Cambridge Analytica scandal has awoken the FTC from its long digital privacy slumber,” said Jeffrey Chester, executive director for the Washington-based privacy nonprofit Center for Digital Democracy.Neither Zuckerberg nor his company has identified those who carried out the data scraping. Outside experts believe they could have been identity thieves, scam artists or shady data brokers assembling marketing profiles. In this April 18, 2017, file photo, conference workers speak in front of a demo booth at Facebook’s annual F8 developer conference, in San Jose, Calif. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify before Congress next week as authorities investigate allegations that the political data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica inappropriately accessed data on millions of Facebook users to influence elections. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File) In this Nov. 9, 2017, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg meets with a group of entrepreneurs and innovators during a round-table discussion at Cortex Innovation Community technology hub in St. Louis. Facebook said Wednesday, April 5, 2018, that it has shut down a feature that let people search for Facebook users if they had their phone number or email address. In a call with reporters on Wednesday, Zuckerberg said the company had tried “rate limiting” the searches. This restricted how many searches someone can conduct at one time, based on their device’s IP address. But Zuckerberg said this was circumvented by bad actors cycling through multiple IP addresses. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File) Firefox maker Mozilla to stop Facebook advertising because of data scandal Explore further In this Nov. 9, 2017, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg meets with a group of entrepreneurs and innovators during a round-table discussion at Cortex Innovation Community technology hub in St. Louis. Facebook said Wednesday, April 5, 2018, that it has shut down a feature that let people search for Facebook users if they had their phone number or email address. In a call with reporters on Wednesday, Zuckerberg said the company had tried “rate limiting” the searches. This restricted how many searches someone can conduct at one time, based on their device’s IP address. But Zuckerberg said this was circumvented by bad actors cycling through multiple IP addresses. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File) A foreign entity could conceivably use such information to influence elections or stir up discord—exactly what Russia is alleged to have done, using Facebook and other social media, in the 2016 presidential elections.Privacy advocates have long been critical of Facebook’s penchant for pushing people to share more and more information, often through pro-sharing default options.While the company offers detailed privacy controls—users can turn off ad targeting, for example, or face recognition, and post updates that no one else sees—many people never change their settings, and often don’t even know how to.The company has tried to simplify its settings multiple times over the years, most recently this week.Winterton said that for individual Facebook users, worrying about this data scraping won’t do much good—after all, the data is already out there. But she said it might be a good time to “reflect on what we are sharing and how we are sharing it and whether we need to.” Citation: Facebook: Most users may have had public data ‘scraped’ (2018, April 6) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-facebook-users.html “Just because someone asks us information, it doesn’t mean we have to give it to them if we are not comfortable,” she said.She added that while she no longer has a Facebook account, when she did she put her birth year as 1912 and her hometown as Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Neither is true. Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday on when it discovered the data scraping.In his call with reporters Wednesday, Zuckerberg said the company had tried “rate limiting” the searches. This restricted how many searches someone can conduct at one time from a particular IP address, a numeric designation that identifies a device’s location on the internet. But Zuckerberg said the scrapers circumvented that defense by cycling through multiple IP addresses.The scraped information was limited to what a user had already chosen to make public—which, depending on a person’s privacy settings, could be a lot—as well as what Facebook requires people to share. That includes full name, profile picture and listings of school or workplace networks.But hackers and scam artists could then use that information—and combine it with other data in circulation—to pull hoaxes on people, plant malware on their computers or commit other mischief.Having access to such a massive amount of data could also pose national security risks, Winterton said. In this Jun 7, 2013, file photo, the Facebook “like” symbol is illuminated on a sign outside the company’s headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Australian authorities say they are investigating whether Facebook breached the country’s privacy law when personal information of more than 300,000 Australian users was obtained by Cambridge Analytica, a Trump-linked political consulting firm, without their authorization. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File) © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Zuckerberg said the company detected the problem in a data-privacy audit started after the Cambridge Analytica disclosures, but didn’t say why the company hadn’t noticed it—or fixed it—earlier. read more

Protesters take to streets to declare new Ethiopian region

first_imgHAWASSA, Ethiopia (Reuters) – Protesters in the Ethiopian city of Hawassa blocked roads and burned tires on Thursday after security forces thwarted a meeting of activists to declare a new region for their Sidama ethnic group, witnesses said. The declaration would be a test of whether Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s federal government can stick to its commitment to peaceful political reforms amid increasing demands from competing ethno-nationalist groups. Hawassa is the capital of the multi-ethnic Southern Nations region but some Sidama – who make up the largest group there – want it as the capital of their own new entity. Almost all shops were closed and few cars were on the streets in Hawassa on Thursday as protesters wearing traditional red, white and yellow striped Sidama scarves and hats marched to the venue of a planned meeting of Sidama elders and youth. But activists told Reuters that security forces prevented them from accessing the meeting venue, and that mobile data had been blocked in an apparent move to impair their means of communication. There were no immediate reports of violence. Ethiopian authorities had no immediate comment on the situation in Hawassa, 275 km (170 miles) from the national capital Addis Ababa. On Tuesday, the National Election Board tried to defuse the situation at the last minute by promising the Sidama they could hold a referendum on having their own region within five months. But some activists said they had already requested a referendum a year ago with no response. The constitution guarantees the right to a referendum within a year, but does not say what should happen if it is not held. The federal system in Africa’s second most populous country is designed to allow larger ethnic groups a degree of autonomy. But smaller communities like the Sidama, who comprise about 5% of Ethiopia’s 105 million people, say they have been sidelined. In addition to the Sidama, at least eight more ethnic groups are campaigning for their own regions. The Horn of Africa country has seen an explosion of violence since Abiy began his reforms, which have included ending bans on political parties, releasing political prisoners and welcoming home rebel groups. Writing by Omar Mohammed; Editing by Mark HeinrichOur Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.last_img read more

AmInvest Research retains Neutral on EMS players for H2

first_img Business News 05 Jul 2019 AmInvest Research neutral on O&G, top picks Serba Dinamik, Dialog KUALA LUMPUR: AmInvestment Research is retaining its Neutral stance on Electronics Manufacturing Services (EMS) players for 2H19.It said on Friday the manufacturers’ positive prospects tied to the production of household general products such as V.S. Industry (VSI) and ATA IMS (ATA) have been fairly factored in.The research house said ATA’s 4QFY19 results were below expectations at RM21mil due to lower box-build orders as there were less working days attributed to festive seasons, and higher taxation seen for the quarter as some expenses were being disallowed for tax purposes. “ATA’s FY20 earnings are expected to be boosted by higher sales orders from its key customer following the addition of two assembly lines,” it said. VSI’s 3QFY19 results were slightly above expectations at RM22mil, despite a 22% decline in core profit and 10% fall in revenue due to slowdown in orders for its key customer in its Malaysian segment.The decline in box build orders for its key customer’s floorcare products was not as severe as initially anticipated while the customer’s beauty product sales boosted orders. “VSI’s 4Q is anticipated to register similar profits based on its current order visibility, also owing to the 4Q being a seasonally stronger quarter for one of its key Malaysian operations customer, Keurig.“VSI currently has 3.5 lines running for the key customer, producing a mixture of a personal care product and floorcare products while ATA has 14 lines for its key customer with a broad product range of floorcare products and healthy lifestyle products, after adding two assembly lines for FY20F on the back of growing orders,” it said.To recap, AmInvest Research said VSI and ATA are diversifying their customer base through securing new customers.In March 2019, VSI entered into a master supply agreement with Bissell in March 2019, where the group has dedicated a 160,000 sqft plant to the customer that is equipped with injection moulding facilities, assembly lines, a warehouse and test lab. Bissell’s earnings contribution kicks in from FY20F onwards with sales anticipated to reach RM1.2bil by CY2022. VSI is expected to mass produce one model of its carpet cleaner in August 2019. Higher margins are expected for Bissell relative to VSI’s other customers due to the ability to choose and negotiate its own suppliers which could potentially lead to margin savings.As for ATA secured a contract to manufacture a household appliance equipped with Internet of Things (IoT) capabilities. The group has allocated 1 line for the customer but the contribution is expected to be negligible at 1–2% of total revenue. Although production volume is low, ATA is keen to explore the potential of IoT capabilities.AmInvest Research said vertical integration positioning translates to more job wins.It pointed out VSI is a known vertically-integrated player with tooling, plastic injection, PCBA and assembling capabilities, which give it an edge compared with peers who lack PCBA or tooling capabilities. However, local peer SKP Resources (SKP) has recently added PCBA capabilities, commencing in 1H19.Meanwhile, ATA has also bumped up its efforts to be vertically-integrated by adding 4 capabilities i.e. PCBA, battery pack, wire harness and brush bar assembly in order to be self-sufficient and reduce reliance on external suppliers.  ATA’s group chairman Datuk Seri Foo Chee Juan said the company has eight surface-mount technology (SMT) lines on the private side and plans to increase this to 18 lines by 2HCY19, with plans to inject the PCBA and battery pack capabilities into ATA by mid-2021. Wire harness production will commence in August 2019 while brush bar assembly will start production at end-CY2019, with contributions expected in 2HFY20 and 4QFY20 respectively.Following the US-China trade war, VSI has received enquiries from MNCs looking to shift or diversify their manufacturing bases from China to Southeast Asia. The group is in the midst of discussion with various prospects and is positive on its potential to  secure new orders and/or customers as it has a 180K sqft factory which will be ready by end-CY2019 to accommodate new prospects.AmInvest Research said it may upgrade the sector to Overweight (i) the companies secure major orders and/or key customers which boosts box-build orders; and (ii) performance of overseas operations (such as VSI’s) improves due to better cost-saving initiatives and comeback in sales orders. Analyst Reports Related News Analyst Reports 11 Jun 2019 AmInvest Research neutral on property sector, Sunway, IOI Prop top picks {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Analyst Reports 08 Jul 2019 AmInvest Research keeps forecasts on Sime Darby, maintains Hold call Tags / Keywords: Related News “VSI’s 4Q is anticipated to register similar profits based on its current order visibility, also owing to the 4Q being a seasonally stronger quarter for one of its key Malaysian operations customer, Keurig,” AmInvest Research says.last_img read more

Jammu and Kashmir IED module busted in Shopian 2 arrested

first_img Asian News International ShopianJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 18:54 IST A case under relevant sections of law has been registered. (File Photo)Jammu and Kashmir Police busted an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) module in Shopian on Saturday and arrested two persons in connection with the case.Police claimed to have recovered incriminating materials.A case under relevant sections of law has been registered.Further investigation is underway.ALSO READ | Jammu and Kashmir: Couple injured in Pakistani firing along LoC in RajouriALSO WATCH | Pakistan violates ceasefire along LoC in J&K’s PoonchFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySnigdha Choudhury Jammu and Kashmir: IED module busted in Shopian, 2 arrestedPolice claimed to have recovered incriminating materials.advertisement Nextlast_img read more