VR needs more Disneystyle magic like The Void from CES 2019

first_img CES 2019 Now playing: Watch this: After this, it sounds like The Void’s modular physical spaces could be engineered to feel more like escape rooms. Expect some overlap. I didn’t try their more magical, more haunted house-like Nicodemus experience yet. And The Void’s upcoming Marvel VR experience could introduce even more tricks. But Hickman is quick to explain that the best immersive experiences come from a leap of trust, using key early moments to encourage people to reach out and touch real walls and buttons with your fingers.I got so used to seeing Bridget next to me as a cartoon that I didn’t think to look down and realize my avatar had no feet. The Void doesn’t use trackers on legs or feet yet, but it never bothered me. Bridget’s avatar seemed to have legs. So I assumed I did, too. The illusion was complete.The Void’s roughly 15-minute “rides” work with up to four people and cost roughly $30 a person, which is a splurge. But, it’s cheaper than a vacation to Disney.The Void’s not the only company pursuing Disney-fied VR. Audi’s Marvel-themed VR Holoride debuted at this year’s CES, the company tuning its immersive thrills to work while riding in an actual car. Maybe it’s not a surprise that both are Disney-themed. Disney rides know how to feel welcoming to all people. Disney rides aren’t too scary. Disney rides are universal.When I took off the headset afterward, I thought I was finishing a ride at Disneyland. And that’s the type of feeling more VR still needs. Scott Stein/CNET Somewhere in a labyrinth of simulated Venetian canals in a Las Vegas mall, there’s a slick-looking glowing storefront that’s easy to miss. THE VOID, it says in large letters. Star Wars stormtroopers beckon from the windows.We’ve come to climb inside Disney’s Ralph Breaks The Internet movie at CES 2019, courtesy of The Void’s location-based VR experience, “Ralph Breaks VR,” just down the hall from the halls of the show.Ralph Breaks VR launched last fall, and isn’t “new” for CES. It’s the first of five Disney experiences the company’s creating in partnership with ILMxLab, including one based on a 2019 Marvel movie (they won’t say which one yet). But it still wowed me, a seasoned vet of location-based VR, at a show already filled with other tech vying for my attention. It impressed both CNET editor Bridget Carey and myself, and worked a perfect blend of thrill ride and comforting onboarding. Even after all these years of VR, and especially with so much VR fatigue, good immersive design matters a lot. Even with heavy backpacks, I had a blast at The Void.The Void’s immersive experiences have been running at 11 locations around the world, with a Washington, DC center coming soon. I last tried holodeck-like multiroom experiences in 2016, putting on a VR backpack and zapping ghosts in Ghostbusters Dimension. Now, Bridget and I are choosing Disney character identities from little cards on a table. We watch a short movie on a screen, where Ralph and Vanellope von Schweetz tell us what we’re about to do.Then we put on our VR backpacks and vibrating haptic vests to dive in to Wreck-It Ralph. There’s a good chance you still haven’t tried any location-based VR. Think of a room where you can wander around in VR, but the objects in the room are perfectly mapped so you can reach out and feel the wall, press a button, open a door. The Void’s founder and chief creative officer, Curtis Hickman, is a magician who explores working ideas of illusion, theater and magic theory to trick our brains better in VR.Despite advanced VR backpacks and hand-tracking sensors that can show my fingers virtually, The Void’s experiences also use good-old fashioned theatrical tech like fans and heaters. A room can feel toasty. A balcony in the Disney-fied version of the internet feels breezy. The floor rumbles when a massive glass-walled shuttle flies by. 10 Photos Tags CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show.CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. Post a comment Now playing: Watch this: Magic and VR collide at CES 2019 with The Void Ralph Breaks VR, and we’re right there with him at CES… Share your voice 0 The top 10 products of CES 2019 3:14 13:27 Wearable Tech CES Products Virtual Reality Disneylast_img read more

Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato has a 108piece grille that moves

first_img null Aston Martin DBS Superleggera has gorgeous looks and… Now playing: Watch this: Enlarge ImageLeave it to Aston Martin and Zagato to create a car with a grille that literally flows when the vehicle is started up. Aston Martin Aston Martin and design house Zagato have a six-decade-long relationship, combining forces to create some of the most stunning vehicles on the road. As part of Zagato’s 100th birthday, Aston Martin will offer up 19 examples of the new DBS GT Zagato, and the automaker is finally ready to show off its production-ready shape and offer up a bit more information about what to expect.Aston Martin on Tuesday unveiled a small handful of pictures that show the production form of the DBS GT Zagato alongside its old-school sibling, the DB4 GT Zagato Continuation. Starting with a DBS Superleggera, the body picks up some wild new styling, including a full carbon roof that eliminates the rear glass, as well as some stunning taillights, new flourishes on the sides and a curvaceous front end.To accommodate the roof, Aston Martin created a camera-based rearview mirror that still allows the driver to see behind the vehicle without any rear windshield. Consider it like those mass-market mirrors that let you swap between normal and camera-based viewing, only the former is impossible because there actually isn’t any rear glass at all. If you think that’s wild, take a look at the grille. It looks intricate, sure, but it’s even crazier than you might think. The grille comprises 108 pieces of diamond-shaped carbon fiber. When the car is off, the grille looks sealed up with a flush appearance, but upon starting the car, those pieces “flutter into life,” as Aston puts it, physically opening up to provide the car’s V12 engine with air. Good luck trying to get that repaired anywhere but the dealership.At a cost of roughly $8 million, the grille had damn well better mimic a living being. But then again, that price tag doesn’t just include one car. DBS GT Zagato buyers also receive a DB4 GT Zagato Continuation model, a handbuilt coupe finished in the same hue as the original DB4 GT Zagato cars that were built in the 1960s. All of a sudden, paying $8 million for two utterly stunning small-batch creations doesn’t sound so obscene.aston-dbs-gt-zagato-002Enlarge ImageThe rear end of the DBS GT Zagato is breathtaking, and not just because it lacks a rear windshield. Aston Martin Aston Martin Preview • 2019 Aston Martin DBS Superleggera: Beast mode More about 2019 Aston Martin DBS Superleggera 2020 Hyundai Sonata first drive: An attractive and compelling midsize sedan Exotic Cars Superluxury Cars Performance Cars Coupescenter_img 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Share your voice 0 More From Roadshow 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Tags 8:32last_img read more

Gray Wants More Doctors in Eastern DC

first_imgD.C. Council member Vincent Gray (D-Ward 7) wants more physicians to set up their practices in neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River. He recently authored legislation to make that happen.Ward 7 Council member Vincent Gray has introduced a bill to bring more doctors to the eastern side of D.C. (AFRO File Photo)On March 7 Gray, chairman of the Committee on Health, introduced the “Community Health Care Revolving Capital Fund Act of 2017.” The bill creates a fund for the purpose of attracting physicians and increasing the capacity of existing providers whether they practice in primary care, specialty care, or community-based care in eastern Washington, D.C.“One of my main priorities coming out of the Ward 7 Summit I convened in Ward 7 three months ago is making sure the residents of the East End of the city have access to a world-class integrated health care system,” Gray, District mayor from 2011-2015, said. “There is a gap in the system – the physicians that are providing the care are absent from the areas of our city that have the greatest need.”Monies in the fund would be loaned to practitioners in medically underserved areas and can be used for costs associated with opening or modernizing a health care practice. All income and interest payments made pursuant to the loan agreements between the administrator of the fund and participating borrowers would be paid back into the fund for future use.Gray said, “Wards 7 and 8 lead the District in almost every conceivable negative health outcome and that needs to change.”The Department of Health published a Physician and Physician Assistant Workforce study in September 2015 that showed Wards 2 and 5 have the highest numbers of doctor’s offices followed by Wards 1 and 3. The study also showed that Ward 7 is medically under-served and Ward 8 also, despite the presence of the United Medical Center in its boundaries. Ward 8, the poorest ward in the city economically, has the lowest number of primary care and specialty doctors.Gray’s bill is co-sponsored by council members Anita Bonds (D-At Large), Brandon Todd (D-Ward 4), Robert White (D-At Large), Trayon White (D-Ward 8), Mary Cheh (D-Ward 3), Jack Evans (D-Ward 2), Kenyan McDuffie (D-Ward 5), and Charles Allen (D-Ward 6), which constitutes a super-majority of the legislative body.The Medical Society of the District of Columbia is the city’s arm of the American Medical Association. Pia Duryea is the director of communications and she told the {AFRO} that her organization hasn’t taken a position on the Gray bill.But, there is community support for Gray’s bill.“I support it,” Ward 8 community activist Sandra “S.S.” Seegars told the {AFRO}. “I recently needed the services of an orthopedic doctor and I googled to find one that is close to me. The closest one is on H Street N.E. and, of course, that isn’t Ward 8.”Seegars said that the UMC’s presence hasn’t increased the number of doctors practicing in her ward, either. She notes that some Ward 8 residents travel to Prince George’s County to visit a doctor.“This legislation isn’t anything new,” Patricia Howard-Chittams, who lives in Ward 7, told the {AFRO}. “It has been discussed before and included nurse practitioners. I would agree that just as there are food deserts, Wards 7 and 8 are healthcare deserts.”Howard-Chittams noted that many doctors are affiliated with hospitals and UMC is the only comprehensive medical facility east of the Anacostia River. She also said doctors might be reluctant to relocate east of the river for other reasons.“There is not a lot of space for a doctor in Wards 7 or 8 to set up a medical office,” she said. “We had a center at Penn Branch but it is in a derelict state now. Even if a doctor wanted to set up in this area, there is no place for them to go.”last_img read more