Local musicians unite for a free Live Aid gig

first_imgLocal musician Martin Orr has organised a Country Sunday for Live Aid Ireland in Voodoo Venue Letterkenny.This event is free of charge and will take place on Sunday December 8 from 5pm to 9 pm.Live Aid Ireland is a nationwide fundraising campaign set up to raise money for the homeless services this Christmas. Proceeds will go to the Simon Communities of Ireland countrywide to fund the vital work they do on the front-line to end homelessness.The Simon Community work to empower people to access and retain a home by providing housing, prevention, addiction treatment, emergency response and other targeted interventions, through advocacy and partnership.The number of people who rely on the Simon Community for accommodation, healthcare and support has drastically increased as the homeless crisis has spiralled. Last year alone they gave a helping hand to 7,600 individuals and families.Here’s who can you expect to see at Live Aid Ireland’s Country Sunday:Keith Fletcher will be MC on the night.Honky Tonk HeroesThe Davy K projectMark BlackJean CurranMaria Mc Cormack and Rachael Mc GettiganLetterkenny and District Pipe BandRaffle tickets will be sold throughout the night and Martin and the team in Voodoo Venue welcome any donations. Local musicians unite for a free Live Aid gig was last modified: December 3rd, 2019 by Dionne MeehanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:charitydonegalfreeletterkennyLive Aid IrelandMUSICVoodoo Venuelast_img read more

That Spring in Your Step Is Semi-Automatic

first_imgCross-country runners know the challenge of running on uneven terrain.  What they may not know is that they are executing one of the most difficult operations for robot designers: how to make an upright, walking machine make rapid decisions on irregular surfaces without falling.    Monica Daley of the Royal Veterinary College wrote about this last week in Current Biology.1We know quite a lot about how humans and animals run over completely level, uniform surfaces – conditions that can be easily studied on a track or treadmill.  Yet, the real world is much more complex, requiring frequent stride-to-stride adjustments to deal with bumps, holes and obstacles in the road.  What strategies do runners use to keep moving forward when the going gets rough?  Only recently has biomechanics research begun to turn to this challenging question.  New research by Grimmer and colleagues reveals that the answer may be a lot simpler than you might think.She must have said “simpler” with tongue in cheek, because her next sentence said, “Running involves a cascade of systems working together, including the brain, spinal cord, sensory organs, muscles and bone.”  Earlier she had noted, “We often take our own impressive stability for granted, but if you watch a toddler learn to walk and run, you can see that it can be a challenging task.”    Scientists try to model running with images of a bouncing ball, where tension on landing is released like a spring on the way up.  “Similarly, by using springs in their legs, animals can passively cycle energy through spring recoil, reducing the need for muscle work,” she explained.  Seems simple so far.  But tendons, muscles and joints differ in their springiness.  Did you know that humans have exceptional spring in their step, comparable to horses and kangaroos?    The situation gets harder to model when the cross-country runner gets off the treadmill and onto the trail.  Rocks, ditches, bumps and other obstacles require constant monitoring and adjustment.  The speed of signals in the nerves, though, is finite from toe to brain.  How can the brain keep up with a flood of constantly changing data from the extremities in time to adjust?    Here’s where Grimmer’s theory comes into play: the brain may be ordering a basic bouncing pattern with slight modifications.  This way, decisions are not required for every motion – just minor adjustments as needed.  “This allows the body to keep moving in its simple bouncing pattern without a stumble or fall.”    If true, this means that most of the running motion occurs passively without active brain signaling.  An analogy from business might help:That is not to say that neural control is not required for running.  To change speed, direction, or switch from a run to a walk, active control and path planning is certainly involved.  However, tuning your leg to behave like a simple mass-spring system may allow the brain and spinal cord to worry only about this higher level control, leaving within stride adjustments to the mechanical system.  Think of it as the difference between a ‘micro-managing’ supervisor and one who delegates responsibility and checks in now and then.  Overall, the latter strategy is considered more effective, because it frees the manager to pay attention to the big picture.  However, for this approach to succeed, things must not fall apart when the supervisor is not looking.Notice that this strategy would not work without prior systems being in place.  Legs, muscles, tendons, bones and all the other components have to be able to run the strategy with minimal supervision.    Daley asked a question midway through her article that tempted one to ask a big-picture question: “So, is the spring-like behaviour of human and animal legs an accident of nature, or a strategy to simplify the job of the central nervous system?”  The remaining paragraphs, in which she described the benefits of the delegating-manager strategy, suggested the latter.  She did not, however, use the word evolution anywhere in the article.  If it is not an accident of nature, one can draw one’s own conclusions about where strategies come from.1.  Monica A. Daley, “Biomechanics: Running Over Uneven Terrain Is a No-Brainer,” Current Biology, Volume 18, Issue 22, 25 November 2008, pp. R1064-R1066, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2008.09.050.Have you ever done rock-hopping in a river?  It’s fun and challenging, but the slightest mistake and you could be in for a dunk or broken leg.  Slippery rock, distracting currents, and uneven surfaces galore – did you think about how much calculus your brain has to do on the sensory inputs to do this?  Even a child can manage the task fairly well.  Dr. Daley did not extend her simplified analysis to this and other complex tasks humans perform (think balance beam).    The wonders of the human body should inspire awe and respect.  How could you mistreat your machine?  If you owned a Ferrari, would you not give it special care?  How much more should we care about the tremendous gift the Creator has given us in the body we inhabit.  For more on the unique human capabilities involved in running, read the memorable entry from 11/14/2004, “The Evolution of Marathon Man.”(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

How Did Earth Get Its Phosphorus?

first_imgThe element phosphorus is hard to get to a planet’s surface where it is needed.Phosphorus, abbreviated P with atomic number 15, is an essential element in all living organisms. How do organisms use phosphorus?Phosphorus is an essential element in nucleic acids (DNA, RNA).The energy molecule ATP has three phosphate groups. A cell spends enormous effort recycling ATP.Phosphorylation is an important regulatory step in many cell processes.Cell membranes are composed of phospholipids.Bones and tooth enamel get their hardness from hydroxyapatite, a phosphorus-containing mineral.Phosphorus is taken up by plants from the soil. Its availability can be a limiting factor in ecosystems.Lack of phosphorus can cause malnutrition.“Oxidative phosphorylation” builds ATP in cells. A chain of complex molecular machines in mitochondria and chloroplasts sets up a proton gradient by carefully extracting electrons from the digestion of our food and passing them through a sequence of reactions (the citric acid cycle), with oxygen as the final acceptor in the electron transport chain. The resulting proton gradient then powers ATP synthase, a rotary engine, that uses the energy to “snap” phosphate groups onto ADP in three reaction centers (see animation by CMI). The ATP molecules can then be sent throughout the cell to power numerous enzymatic reactions that require the energy, such as the walking kinesins that carry cargo, and the numerous enzymes that operate on DNA in the nucleus.For all its value to life, phosphorus can also be toxic. Some of the most potent neurotoxins and pesticides contain phosphorus.Molecular machines at work in a living cell (Illustra Media)A highly reactive atom, phosphorus is never found in its elemental form on earth. Its elemental abundance is one gram per kilogram in Earth’s crust, about 16 times as plentiful as copper. On our planet, most of it is found in insoluble rocks. Phosphate mines have much of the element from the decomposed remains of living organisms.It would be hard to imagine a habitable planet without phosphorus, because most astrobiologists recognize the uniqueness of nucleic acids, ATP and phospholipids for cells. So this poses a question: how did Earth become blessed with so much of this element?Planetary Sources of PhosphorusAn article on NASA’s Astrobiology Magazine purports to tell us “How Phosphorus Came In from the Cold.” Below the pretentious headline of this just-so story, we begin to see problems: “phosphorus is rare” in interplanetary dust clouds. “It is even more scarce in the rest of the Solar System,” Sarah Wild writes. “Phosphorus is one of the key elements in biology,” says Matthew Pasek, an astrobiologist and geochemist at the University of South Florida.Unlike the other elements essential for life, phosphorus is mainly found in solid form, whereas the likes of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen are often found as a gas. “[Studying phosphorus] keeps us grounded in actual hard rock samples. Unlike the others, there is no obvious gas form, so has to come from rock sources,” Pasek says. “We hope to tie that eventually to biology and life.”Some meteorites contain phosphorus. The problem, then, is how to get those rocks to Earth in sufficient quantities to season the crust with it. Secular cosmologists believe that all the elements beyond lithium (atomic number 3) were “cooked” by supernovae. Phosphorus, therefore, had to come from a supernova, then get incorporated into interstellar dust clouds, from which they believe planetary systems were made. Pasek worries, though, in his recent paper in Icarus, that “Phosphorus would not have been present as a volatile throughout much of the Solar nebula.”Through a convoluted series of steps, Pasek brings phosphorus in from the cold outer reaches of the solar system by suggesting that it existed in a rare gaseous form called phosphine (PH3) in the cold outer reaches of the Solar System beyond Saturn. (Out to Saturn, it would have been locked up in solids.) From there, Pasek has the problem of getting that phosphide gas to Earth. Also, meteorites from those far reaches could have brought phosphorus to Earth in the form of phosphides. How they could have been distributed equally on the early earth was not addressed.One critic of Pasek’s model says that it is “contentious that gas movement toward the Sun, which was not modeled in the paper, could be faster than the diffusion of gas away from the Sun.” It would seem that the latter would predominate.This is an ongoing problem for astrobiologists, in other words. But it’s fun to get paid for thinking about problems that may not have a naturalistic solution. “The work was supported through NASA’s Emerging Worlds Program,” the article ends. “NASA Astrobiology provides resources for this and other Research and Analysis programs within the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) that solicit proposals relevant to astrobiology research.” NASA money, of course, is taxpayer money.Maybe we need to add another zone to our list of habitable zones: the “Phosphorus Availability Zone.” But this is only a problem for materialists. The Creator tells us in His word that He “made the world to be inhabited” (Isaiah 45:18). Obviously he put the ingredients required for life where they were needed, in the abundances required.See more about habitability requirements in Dr Henry Richter’s book, Spacecraft Earth: A Guide for Passengers, chapter one.For earlier articles on phosphorus and biology, see:Most exoplanets are not habitable (26 June 2018)Why astrobiologists hammer planets (26 Sept 2016)Fooling around with OOL (31 May 2010).Invent animals: Just add phosphorus (11 June 2007)or search on “phosphorus” in the search bar. (Visited 490 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Tips from a Commercial Demolition Company

first_imgThe demolition of a building is a carefully orchestrated, thoroughly researched affair. Demolition contractors must be conscientious about both employee safety and environmental safety, or else risk losing their business licenses. Just like general contractors, demolition experts are required to follow OSHA standards for employee safety. And demolition firms must also abide by EPA standards guiding environmentally safe deconstruction techniques. Hazardous construction materials, such as asbestos, must be safely removed before a building can be demolished.Some forward-thinking demolition companies are exceeding government standards and are finding innovative new ways to reuse old building materials, rather than sending them straight to the landfill. Because they have a unique perspective on how to best take down buildings, commercial demolition experts can teach residential contractors quite a bit about material selection, building methods and more. RELATED ARTICLES Deconstruction versus Demolition An Agent of Green Invention in Philly: Row House DemolitionJob-Site Recycling: PVCGBA Encyclopedia: Job-Site RecyclingRecycling Vinyl SidingJob-Site Recycling: Asphalt Roofing ShinglesAsphalt Shingle Recycling LocatorJob-Site Recycling: Gypsum WallboardSaving Energy by RecyclingCarpet RecyclingVideo: Grinding Drywall and Wood Recycling concrete, steel and other naterialsGreen industrial demolition contractors know what may be recycled from a defunct building. This information can come in handy when residential builders are selecting earth-friendly building materials. From a commercial demolition perspective, the materials listed below can effectively be recycled upon demolition. In fact, with disposal costs as high as they are, it’s often worthwhile to pay for the labor it takes to separate them out.Concrete. A single demolition project can yield tons of concrete. Fortunately, this concrete may be crushed into gravel, a high-demand material in new building projects. Some industrial demolition contractors even employ enormous, mobile concrete crushers that can easily process all concrete on-site.Steel. With the right equipment and expertise, steel and other scrap metals can be processed for recycling into new products.Interior doors and beams. Wood doors, posts and beams in good condition can often be sold or reused – there are plenty of architectural salvage companies that are interested in these types of materials. If the condition is too poor for reuse, the wood can be recycled.Sinks and toilets. Again, if they’re in good condition, these fixtures can usually be reclaimed by an architectural salvage company. Otherwise, porcelain models can be recycled with the concrete, while stainless steel fixtures can be recycled with the other scrap metals.Construction and demolition are the two ends of a building’s lifecycle, so it makes sense that those responsible for each phase would have plenty to teach each other. If your contracting crew could use an injection of fresh building knowledge, consider learning from a demolition expert. Fall protectionBecause demolition companies are in the business of tearing things up and creating holes, they’re acutely aware of the importance of fall protection. When working around any hole, open wall or open roof with a fall greater than 6 feet, demolition workers are typically required to wear full body restraints. These same hazards are often present during the construction phase, as well, which means fall protection is just as important for builders. Focusing on the eco-friendly lessons of demolition has a definite cost-value for residential builders, who have seen a spike in consumer demand for green construction. Cradle-to-cradle building techniques that anticipate green demolition down the road can contribute points to LEED certification – the Holy Grail of earth-friendly building. The following is a look at some of the things industrial demolition contractors urge residential builders to keep in mind.center_img Elder Demolition is a fully licensed and insured demolition company based in Portland, Ore., with certifications for hazardous waste handling as well as broad experience with LEED-certified green demolitions. Limiting exposure to dangerous chemicalsOf course, residential building contractors are aware of the dangers of asbestos, lead and other hazardous materials in home construction. No new homes contain these toxins, but it’s not unusual for residential contractors to be hired for retrofitting work to bring an older home up to code. Here are a few examples of irritating but not illegal hazards residential construction workers could see while working in older buildings:Synthetic mineral fibers (SMF). These are fibrous products made from ceramic, fiberglass and rock wool. Studies have found that SMFs aren’t as noxious as asbestos, so they are still used in sound and thermal protection products. Irritation to the eyes, nose and throat is the most common symptom of SMF exposure, but some question whether SMFs could also cause lung cancer, since they sometimes contain fiberglass. Industrial demolition experts recommend requiring workers to wear respirators and protective clothing when SMF contact is possible.Wood dust containing formaldehyde. This wood dust can become stuck in the nasal passages when inhaled, and it is thought to have caused nasal cancer in some woodworkers. Wood paneling and particleboard sometimes contains the toxic substance formaldehyde; when the wood is cut or otherwise manipulated, formaldehyde-laced dust is sent into the air, posing a major risk for nearby workers. For this reason, demolition contractors recommend wearing protective respiration gear when dealing with particleboard and paneling.Lead paint. One hazard that’s frequently overlooked is the danger of torching steel beams that have been painted with lead paint. Simply cutting a few painted beams can expose a builder to airborne lead levels that are off the charts. In these cases, OSHA requires workers to be provided with respirators, protective clothing and hand washing stations.These are only a few of the materials demolition companies must carefully monitor and prepare for when taking down buildings. Indeed, OSHA has an entire set of standards for demolition procedures. If your team isn’t confident in this area, consider consulting with a commercial demolition professional. A longstanding demolition company will have wide-ranging experience in taking down everything from air traffic control towers to factories. Their experts can provide unique insight into how to best remove chemical hazards.last_img read more

7 (More) Simple Photography Hacks

first_imgYou don’t have to be rich to use these 7 simple photography hacks.As an artist you may need to save every penny you can. So instead of going out and purchasing extremely expensive equipment, try using some of these very simple photography hacks that utilize everyday household objects laying around your house. If you haven’t watched it yet check out this video:Just to get an idea of how expensive each hack costs, we’ve gone ahead and priced out each technique so you can know how much to save. Most of the items on the list are probably just laying around your house.1. Lens ProtectorTools Needed: Beer CosyTotal Cost: Free – $2.192. Reflective Product PhotographyTools Needed: A Black TileTotal Cost: $2.973. Light PaintingTools Needed: Anything with a portable screen.Total Cost: Free, just use your phone.4. Glass Ball EffectTools Needed: A Crystal BallTotal Cost: $15.005. Fire!Tools Needed: Lighter & Aerosol CanTotal Cost: $2.006. Soft FilterTools Needed: Hose-Style Sock & Rubber BandTotal Cost: $2.007. SpotlightTools Needed: MirrorTotal Cost: $5.00(BONUS #1) Tube LightTools Needed: Florescent Tube LightTotal Cost: $8.77(BONUS #2) Rain ProtectorTools Needed: Plastic Bag & Rubber BandTotal Cost: $2.00This video was first shared on COOPH’s YouTube channel. Thanks for sharing guys!Know of any other cheap photo or video hacks? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

1,065 candidates in fray for BDC polls in Jammu & Kashmir

first_imgAfter the final withdrawal of nomination papers, 1,065 candidates are in fray for the October 24 Block Development Council (BDC) polls in Jammu and Kashmir, State election officials said on Saturday.853 Independents “A total of 1,092 nominations, including 853 Independents, were found eligible after the scrutiny and withdrawal, out of which 27 candidates were elected unopposed as chairpersons, leaving 1,065 in the fray,” the officials said. The highest number of 101 candidates are trying their luck from north Kashmir’s Kupwara district, followed by nearby Baramulla (90), Jammu (82), Rajouri (76), Doda (74), Kathua (72) Udhampur and Budgam (58 each), Kishtwar (44), Ramban (43) and Reasi (39), they said. The officials said Leh and Kargil districts together accounted for 74 candidates — 38 from Kargil and 36 from Leh, while Shopian district in south Kashmir has the lowest number of only four candidates. Another five candidates are in fray from Srinagar district. Polls in 310 blocksThere are 316 blocks in the State, out of these two are without elected panches or Sarpanches besides, four blocks have been reserved for women and there are no women candidates. Thus, the elections would be held in 310 blocks on October 24. All necessary arrangements have been made by the authorities for the smooth conduct of elections, the officials said. They said there would be one polling station for one BDC, and accordingly, 310 polling stations have been set up in the State, one in each block where elections are to be held. There are 26,629 voters, of which 8,313 are women and 18,316 men for all the 316 blocks across the 22 districts of J&K, the officials said, adding that the ballot boxes will be used during the polls as the election shall be held through secret ballot.last_img read more

Ankle arthroscopy

first_imgDefinitionAnkle arthroscopy is surgery that uses a tiny camera and surgical tools to examine or repair the tissues inside or around your ankle. The camera is called an arthroscope. The procedure allows the doctor to detect problems and make repairs to your ankle without making larger cuts in the skin and tissue. This means that you may have less pain and recover more quickly.Alternative NamesAnkle surgeryDescriptionYou will likely receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means you will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Or, you may have regional anesthesia. Your leg and ankle area will be numbed so that you do not feel any pain. If you receive regional anesthesia, you will also be given medicine to make you very sleepy during the operation.During the procedure, the surgeon does the following:Inserts the arthroscope into your ankle through a small incision. The scope is connected to a video monitor in the operating room. This allows the surgeon to view the inside of your ankle.Inspects all the tissues of your ankle. These tissues include cartilage, bones, tendons, and ligaments.Repairs any damaged tissues. To do this, your surgeon makes 1 to 3 more small incisions and inserts other instruments through them. A tear in a muscle, tendon, or cartilage is fixed. Any damaged tissue is removed.At the end of the surgery, the incisions will be closed with stitches and covered with a dressing (bandage). Most surgeons take pictures from the video monitor during the procedure to show you what they found and what repairs they made.advertisementYour surgeon may need to do open surgery if there is a lot of damage. Open surgery means you will have a large incision so that the surgeon can get directly to your bones and tissues.Why the Procedure Is DoneArthroscopy may be recommended for these ankle problems:Ankle pain: Arthroscopy allows the surgeon to explore what is causing your ankle pain.Ligament tears: A ligament is a band of tissue that connects bone to bone. Several ligaments in the ankle help keep it stable and allow it to move. Torn ligaments can be repaired with this type of surgery.Ankle impingement: Tissues in your ankle can become swollen and sore from overuse. This makes it hard to move the joint. Arthroscopy can remove the tissue so you can move your joint.Scar tissue:This can form after an injury to the ankle. This surgery can remove scar tissue.Arthritis: Arthroscopy can be used to help reduce pain and improve movement.Cartilage injuries: This surgery can be used to diagnose or repair cartilage and bone injuries.Risks Risks of general anesthesia are:Allergic reactions to medicinesBreathing problemsRisks of ankle arthroscopy are:BleedingInfectionBlood clotFailure of surgery to relieve symptomsFailure of repair to healWeakness of the ankleInjury to tendon, blood vessel, or nerveBefore the ProcedureTell your health care provider what medicines you are taking. This includes medicines, supplements, or herbs you bought without a prescription.During the 2 weeks before your surgery:You may be asked to stop taking medicines that make it harder for your blood to clot. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve), and other medicines.Ask your health care provider which medicines you should still take on the day of your surgery.If you have diabetes, heart disease, or other medical conditions, your surgeon will ask you to see your doctor who treats you for these conditions.Tell your health care provider if you have been drinking a lot of alcohol, more than 1 or 2 drinks a day.If you smoke, try to stop. Ask your health care provider or nurse for help. Smoking can slow wound and bone healing.Tell your doctor about any cold, flu, fever, herpes breakout, or other illness you may have before your surgery.On the day of surgery:You will likely be asked not to drink or eat anything for 6 to 12 hours before the procedure.Take the medicines your health care provider told you to take with a small sip of water.Your health care provider will tell you when to arrive at the hospital. Be sure to arrive on time.After the ProcedureYou can usually go home the same day after you recover from the anesthesia. You should have someone drive you home.Keep your ankle elevated above your heart for two to three days to help reduce swelling and pain. You can also apply cold packs to reduce swelling.Keep your bandage clean and dry. Your health care provider can show you how to change the dressing.You can take pain relievers, if needed, as long as your doctor says its safe to do so.Youll need to use a walker or crutches and keep weight off your foot.Outlook (Prognosis)advertisementArthroscopy uses small cuts in the skin. Compared to regular surgery, you may have:Less pain and stiffnessFewer complicationsFaster recoveryThe small cuts will heal quickly, and you may be able to resume your normal activities in a few days. However, if your doctor had to repair a lot of tissue in your ankle, it may take several weeks to heal. How quickly you heal depends on how complicated the surgery was.You may be shown how to do gentle exercises as you heal. Or, your doctor may recommend that you see a physical therapist to help you regain the full use of your ankle.ReferencesIshikawa S. Arthroscopy of the Foot and Ankle. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbells Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 50.Miller M, Hart J. Surgical Principles. In DeLee, JC, Drez D Jr, Miller MD, eds. DeLee and Drezs Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2009:chap 2.Review Date:5/15/2013Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.last_img read more