HRONIS RACING’S GINGER NUT TACKLES MALES AS SHE HEADS SUNDAY’S $75,000 DESERT CODE STAKES

first_imgHRONIS RACING’S GINGER NUT TACKLES MALES AS SHE HEADS SUNDAY’S $75,000 DESERT CODE STAKES FOR 3-YEAR-OLDS AT FIVE FURLONGS ON TURF SADLER TRAINEE COMES OFF IMPRESSIVE STAKES SCORE AT KEENELAND ARCADIA, Calif. (June 5, 2019)–Hronis Racing’s Ginger Nut, an impressive stakes winner on April 12 at Keeneland, will take on males as she heads a field of six sophomore turf sprinters in Sunday’s $75,000 Desert Code Stakes at 5 ½ furlongs over the Santa Anita turf.  Trained by John Sadler, Irish-bred Ginger Nut, who made her U.S. debut two races back at Gulfstream Park on Feb. 23, will be making her first Santa Anita start on Sunday.GINGER NUTOwner:  Hronis Racing LLCTrainer:  John SadlerA minor stakes winner three starts back versus males in England and by the far the most accomplished runner in the Desert Code lineup, Ginger Nut drew the rail going 5 ½ furlongs and rallied from last to take the ungraded Limestone Turf Sprint Stakes at Keeneland by 1 ¼ lengths on April 12.  A winner of four of her 10 starts, she has earnings of $301,088.  Ridden by eastern based Joel Rosario last time out, she’ll get the services of Drayden Van Dyke on Sunday.LEGENDS OF WAROwner:  C T R Stables LLC (Calvert), Qatar Racing Limited & Steven KehTrainer:  Doug O’NeillGroup II Stakes-placed six starts back in England on Aug. 24, he gave a good account of himself in his U.S. debut two starts back, running a close third in an ungraded five furlong turf stakes at Churchill Downs April 27.  Most recently third, beaten 1 ¼ lengths in a first condition allowance going one mile over a “good” turf here on May 27, this Kentucky-bred colt by Scat Daddy will be making his third start for O’Neill as he cuts back in distance to a five furlong sprint and gets the first-time services of Flavien Prat.  With two wins from nine starts, Legends of War has earnings of $128,189.RAFALOwner:  Sh Rashid bin Humaid Al NuaimiTrainer:  Bob BaffertThis lightly race New York-bred colt by the Bernardini stallion Alpha was a runaway 4 ¼ length maiden winner over a wet fast main track going 5 ½ furlongs here on May 19 and will be trying turf for the first time in his third career start.  Quick from the blocks, he carved out gate to wire splits of 21.60, 44.60 and 56.40 en route to a final clocking of 1:02.60, which earned him a Beyer Speed figure of 86–the top last-out “fig” in the Desert Code field.  He’ll be ridden back by Joe Talamo and could prove an elusive target on Sunday.THE $75,000 DESERT STORMER STAKES WITH JOCKEYS & WEIGHTS IN POST POSITION ORDERRace 6 of 9  Approximate post time 3:30 p.m. PT Ginger Nut–Drayden Van Dyke–119Listing–Mario Gutierrez–124Legends of War–Flavien Prat–122Rafal–Joe Talamo–120Alleva–Rafael Bejarano–122Strictly Biz–Tiago Pereira–120First post time for a nine-race card on Sunday is at 1 p.m. For additional information, please visit santaanita.com or call (626) 574-RACE.last_img read more

New webbased game motivates people to exercise more

first_img Source:https://now.uiowa.edu/2018/07/ui-researchers-turn-exercise-game-and-see-encouraging-results Jul 13 2018A majority of American workers spend most of their day sitting and don’t get enough exercise, putting them at risk for a variety of chronic diseases ranging from diabetes to cancer.So, how do you motivate people to get up and exercise more? A team of researchers at the University of Iowa has one potential solution: Turn everyday exercise into a game. To that end, UI faculty and students designed a web-based game that can be played by anyone with a smartphone and a Fitbit.The co-principal investigators, Lucas Carr, associate professor in the Department of Health and Human Physiology (HHP), and Philip Polgreen, professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, say the results of the pilot study were encouraging. Those results were published this month in the Journal of the American Heart Association.”We essentially found that people who received the game right out of the gates increased their steps by about 2,200 per day, which is close to walking one mile,” Carr says. “Statistically, that’s significant. It’s also clinically significant.”The game, called MapTrek, was designed by the Computational Epidemiology Research (CompEpi) Group, a collaborative group of students and faculty in the UI computer science, internal medicine, and HHP departments, Polgreen says. The project would not have been possible without the contributions from professors James Cremer and Alberto Segre in the Department of Computer Science, Polgreen adds.Polgreen says his research involves developing new approaches to monitoring diseases. Recently, that research extended to designing interventions. MapTrek is an example of such an intervention.Polgreen’s CompEpi group was initially awarded a pilot grant from the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the University of Iowa to develop and test a platform that could monitor activity levels of pre-diabetic and diabetic patients. The platform also sent text messages to patients encouraging them to set daily activity goals.”Our results suggested that goal-setting alone was not enough,” Polgreen says. “So, we decided to design a game with challenges and to make the game social: the result is MapTrek.”Here’s how MapTrek works: Users sync data from accelerometers–in the case of this study, Fitbits–with the web-based MapTrek game. Using Google Maps, MapTrek then moves a virtual avatar along a map in proportion to the number of steps the participant takes. Participants of the study were grouped together and competed against one another in weekly walking challenges each week.”You can see what place you’re in and see where you’re at on this map,” Carr says. “Every week, the race changes to a different place in the world–the Appalachian Trail, the Grand Canyon.”Using Google’s street view function, users can click and see where they’re at in real time, effectively turning the game into a virtual walk or race through different locations. MapTrek also sends users text messages each day to remind them to wear their Fitbit and also to provide encouragement. Users also could take part in daily challenges to earn bonus steps.Related StoriesResearchers identify molecular pathway underpinning exercise and improved motor learningSupervised fun, exercise both improve psychosocial health of children with obesityDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetes”We tried to make it as enjoyable as possible,” Carr says. “We want people to wear their Fitbit and we want them to participate in these games.”For the study, 146 participants–sedentary office workers, ages 21-65 who reported sitting at least 75 percent of their workday–were divided into two groups. Both were given Fitbits, but only one group used their Fitbit along with the MapTrek game. Their activity levels were monitored with the Fitbit’s activity monitor.Carr says Fitbits were chosen because they’re common and their data was accessible. While they are exploring using other fitness monitors, Carr says MapTrek currently only works with a Fitbit. Fitbit did not contribute to the study.During the 10-week study, the researchers found that the Fitbit and MapTrek group walked 2,092 more steps per day and completed 11 more active minutes per day compared with the Fitbit-only group. Active minutes are defined as those in which the participant took more than 100 steps.”If a person can maintain a daily 2,000-step increase, that could result in a clinically significant improvement in their overall health,” Carr says. “It’s associated with about a 10 percent relative reduction in long-term incidence of cardiovascular disease.”Ultimately, the Fitbit and MapTrek group did not maintain the spike in overall activity throughout the 10-week study. Though the Fitbit and MapTrek users regressed, they were still averaging more steps than the Fitbit-only group by the end of the study. Ultimately, the MapTrek group returned to their pre-study fitness levels, Carr says.”Over 10 weeks, the gains in activity declined and the two groups looked similar by the end of the study,” Polgreen says. “But, we are encouraged by the big initial increase in daily steps and are now looking to improve the game in ways that result in longer changes in behavior.”Polgreen noted that MapTrek, based on the CompEpi group’s original work with subjects at high risk for diabetes, is now also being used as part of a National Institutes of Health-funded study to test its effectiveness within that population. Current MapTrek development is focused on making the game even more engaging and interactive.Carr says more research will be done on sedentary office workers, but they’re also looking at clinical populations, including cardiac rehab patients and those suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.”The value of this kind of approach is virtually anyone can play it with minimal risk,” Carr says. “Nearly everyone can benefit from increased levels of activity.”last_img read more