Ramón Laureano’s rapid rise to A’s Opening Day leadoff man

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceTOKYO — Things were a lot different for Ramón Laureano just a year ago.Around this time in 2018, the A’s center fielder was frustrated in extended spring training down in Arizona in the aftermath of breaking his left pinky finger after he was hit by a pitch in a Cactus League game. The injury robbed him of re-establishing himself as a top prospect with his new organization after the Houston Astros had soured on him …last_img read more

Is Business Headed for a Cognitive-First Future?

first_imgFollow the Puck Brad AndersonEditor In Chief at ReadWrite How Data Analytics Can Save Lives Related Posts AI: How it’s Impacting Surveillance Data Storage Tags:#data#Trending Brad is the editor overseeing contributed content at ReadWrite.com. He previously worked as an editor at PayPal and Crunchbase. You can reach him at brad at readwrite.com. As the world generates more and more data — at a clip of 2.5 quintillion bytes each day — it simultaneously struggles to manage it. With humans unable to manually process such large amounts of data and analyze its implications, the business world has to turn to machines to take on some of the load.Smart machines can transform data points into patterns and insights; imbuing these machines with human knowledge and allowing them to “learn” from the additional information they gather can speed up the computations needed by businesses. Cognitive machines aren’t just reactive, however. With enough data, they can anticipate problems, suggest solutions, and carry them out without human intervention.Cognitive predictive maintenance for the Industrial Internet of Things, an arena in which machines detect failures in other machines, is poised to influence whole industries. Empowering machines to perform unsupervised (or partially supervised) techniques to identify equipment failures quickly and accurately will save money for businesses. From preventing downtime to freeing up employee time for higher-level issues, cognitive predictive maintenance will revolutionize how enterprises handle asset management.Thy Machine’s Will Be DoneCognitive predictive maintenance uses sensors and artificial intelligence to monitor operations of complex systems, giving early warning in the form of anomaly detection. This early detection can help address minor issues before they turn into more serious problems.Deep reinforcement learning, a component of many cognitive predictive maintenance systems, uses algorithms to determine which pieces of information — gathered from resources such as manuals and operator notes or through real-time happenings — are relevant. Combining these with feedback received from a company’s techs, these autonomous solutions will create a library of knowledge without human input — beyond the manual feedback, of course.“The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is unlocking new possibilities for asset-intensive industries. … Sadly, almost 85 percent of these industries let this data sourced from trillions of data points go unused,” explain the experts at DataRPM, a Progress company, considered a cognitive disruptor in the IIoT maintenance space. “Only the remaining 15 percent possess the capabilities to derive insights from the limited data sourced from a select few sensors. This leads to building generalized models that encompass only a few assets, which are then extrapolated to the entire asset population.”And that’s a big deal: DataRPM has calculated that a 1 percent improvement in productivity across the manufacturing industry can result in $500 million in annual savings. Predicting anomalies can result in a 70 percent elimination of breakdowns, the firm says. With McKinsey predicting the IoT industry will have an economic impact of approximately $11 trillion by 2025, that’s a lot of potential money left on the table without cognitive-first processes.Which Industries Will Benefit?The saying that “data is the new oil” has gained momentum in recent years, and even the oil industry should feel that way. It’s one of a handful of industries that stand to quickly benefit from cognitive predictive maintenance.Oil and gas. With decades-old pipelines, old technology, and dangerous terrain, the oil and gas industry is ripe for machine intervention. Its outsized impact on the environment underscores the importance of predicting failures before they happen. Updated sensors and data analysis can result in not only avoided tragedies, but also 10 percent cost savings through enhanced performance.Manufacturing. Factories are constantly on the lookout for ways to improve their analytics and equipment effectiveness. Cognitive predictive maintenance can help with both these areas, as well as with conducting cognitive visual inspections. Deloitte’s findings suggest that cognitive predictive maintenance helps manufacturing equipment achieve more than 90 percent effectiveness.Automotive. Just like other manufacturing arenas, automotive companies are searching for ways to increase the uptime of their assembly lines and decrease malfunctions and subsequent recalls. Although only 8 percent of automotive manufacturers currently use cognitive predictive maintenance, these companies could save more than $1 million per day by issuing recalls sooner.Aviation. Unsurprisingly, nearly every transportation and logistics industry can benefit from cognitive-first solutions, and aviation’s tight regulations, safety concerns, and replacement schedules make cognitive predictive maintenance a perfect fit. With an aircraft like the A350-900 costing nearly $305 million, it’s clear that downtime for any part of an airline’s fleet can be devastating. Cognitive predictive maintenance can help airlines take care of problems before they need to ground flights.Energy and utilities. With the environment and climate changing rapidly, extreme weather power outages doubled between 2003 and 2012; extreme weather is considered the culprit behind 80 percent of outages. In a society becoming further chained to the internet and machines on a daily basis, energy and utility companies would do well to adopt cognitive predictive maintenance, which can help them predict and manage blackouts and brownouts before they happen.Producing enormous amounts of data means we also need to build systems that can absorb and use that data. Industries that need to process such data before major problems occur likely have a cognitive-first future ahead of them, led by machines smart enough to fix what isn’t yet broken. Leveraging Big Data that Data Websites Should T…last_img read more

How To Be a Trusted Advisor

first_imgYou don’t determine whether or not you are a trusted advisor. That is only something your clients decide for themselves. All you can do is behave in such a way that you influence how your clients view their relationship with you.A trusted advisor brings their client new ideas. A salesperson calls on their client when they have the need to sell something. A trusted advisor calls on their client to bring them new ideas, regardless of whether or not they have something to sell.A trusted advisor has subject matter expertise. They know their business, they know their client’s business, and they have a enough general knowledge about how things work to offer advice worth taking.A trusted advisor values the relationship more than the transaction. A trusted advisor never puts a deal before the relationship. They would prefer not to make a sale if the relationship would be damaged by having made it.A trusted advisor is accountable for outcomes outside of what they sell. A trusted advisor finds a way to own outcomes that have nothing to do with their product or service. It might be general business advice. It might be advice on strategy, marketing, or how to sell. They help their clients wherever and however they can. They don’t limit the value they create to what they sell.A trusted advisor has a personal relationship with their client. This doesn’t mean they have a friendship, even though that is possible, and maybe even likely. There relationships is built on value.Your client will never call you their trusted advisor. Normal people don’t talk that way. You will know you are their trusted advisor when your client calls you before they make decisions. You will know you are playing this role when your client calls you for help in areas where you have no offering, where you have nothing to sell. These things are what makes you a trusted advisor. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Oppn. behind La Martiniere boy’s abduction: U.P. Minister

first_imgState Minister Brijesh Pathak on Tuesday accused the Opposition members of “conspiring the abduction of a schoolboy from Lucknow to defame the government”. “When the government was celebrating its completion of one year, a student of La Martiniere College was kidnapped by his driver Santosh Yadav yesterday (Monday). When the police surrounded a village to get the student released, it was found that it was a conspiracy of the Opposition parties to defame the government,” Mr. Pathak alleged in the Assembly.Oppn. seeks discussionReacting to his claim, the members of the Opposition parties said the allegations were serious and needed a discussion. Speaker Hriday Narain Dixit downplayed the matter saying, “the Opposition members cannot indulge in such activity”. Earlier, as soon as the House met for the day, Leader of the Opposition in the Assembly Ram Govind Chowdhury mentioned a number of murders in Allahabad on Monday and demanded immediate discussion on the issue saying the spate of killings had spread fear among the people living there.Parliamentary Affairs Minister Suresh Kumar Khanna said he had no details on the matter and promised to apprise the House of the issue after getting the requisite information.last_img read more

Rash of new clubs in Kolkata takes over from traditional ones with style and panache

first_imgLIVING IT UP: The pool-side barArchana Agarwal’s children work as hard as her. Since the HR manager at Tata Tea in Kolkata keeps busy, she has enrolled her children in a school-cum-creche. Guilty, Agarwal decided to join a club, hoping her children could catch up on some outdoor activities.She tried,LIVING IT UP: The pool-side barArchana Agarwal’s children work as hard as her. Since the HR manager at Tata Tea in Kolkata keeps busy, she has enrolled her children in a school-cum-creche. Guilty, Agarwal decided to join a club, hoping her children could catch up on some outdoor activities.She tried three of the city’s best places, but didn’t make it. While two clubs told her they were too full, the third informed that her membership might take a decade. “I can’t wait that long,” she says. “My children will grow up by then.”Entrepreneur Ravi Arora had a different experience though he is in the same boat. When he wanted to join one of the better known clubs in Kolkata, a member of its managing committee promised to push his application for a generous fee.”I was asked for Rs 1 lakh even though the membership fee is a little over Rs 50,000,” says a disgusted Arora. Like Agarwal and Arora, there are at least 10,000 people who have been waiting long to get into one or the other of Kolkata’s 10 best clubs, a recent IMRB study reveals. Some of them have been on the list for over a decade. The good news is that a rash of new clubs are cashing in on this lopsided demand-and-supply situation and are fast weaning away the wannabes. While Agarwal is now a member of Ibiza, a new country club 25 km from the city, Arora is part of The Circle, which opened in 1999.A month into operations, Ibiza has notched up 300 takers, each paying Rs 60,000. The Space Circle, which has not even opened yet and has a steeper membership fee of Rs 1.1 lakh, already has four times that number on its rolls.advertisementThere’s also the highway-skirting Lake land Country Club, besides some others in the pipeline: Princeton, another venture by the group which owns Ibiza, and Country Roads, a farmhouse complex with a club, which will be operational by the year 2003.The billiards room at IbizaThe well-heeled Kolkatan, for whom clubbing is a colonial hangover, couldn’t have asked for more. With fewer watering holes than other metros, the club is an essential hangout in Kolkata for taking the family out for a Sunday lunch, entertaining prospective clients or getting sporty on the weekend. “Wherever the British set foot, the first thing they did was to set up a club,” writes novelist Budhadev Guha.The penchant for clubbing is so strong that membership of one or more of the city’s prestigious clubs has come to dictate one’s social standing. Most of Kolkata’s turn-of-the-century clubs had been the preserve of the Brown Sahib till the 1960s.Now everyone wants to be a part of that charmed circle, forcing the clubs to tighten membership norms. While Bengal Club targets only the top company executives, Calcutta Club bars women and under-30s as members.The Calcutta Cricket and Football Club, the Royal Calcutta Golf Club and South Club prefer entrants with a sports background. Others cite legal reasons. According to air commodore (retd) K.B. Menon, managing member of the Tollygunge Club, the club’s charter forbids more than 1,500 permanent members. “And rightly so,” he adds. “A club is an extension of my home. I would like only the people I could bring home to be around me at the club.”That leaves a huge chunk of young people – teens, yuppies, middle-level executives – with virtually nowhere to go. “The new clubs recognise this and are cashing in on it,” says A.K. Dutt, former president of several of the city’s traditional clubs.The facilities they offer reflect this. Space Circle is investing big money in a 7,000-sq ft indoor cricket ground, rollerblading and ice- skating rinks and a two-storey practice rock for mountaineering buffs. The Circle already has never-before perks like an art gallery and a huge children’s room equipped with nannies. Glossing over TraditionThe Calcutta ClubOld HauntsAdvantages: A home away from home, the colonial clubs have an old-world charm about them.Drawbacks: Hemmed in by financial and space constraints, they offer few facilities and fewer memberships.New EntrantsAdvantages: With never-before features like indoor cricket grounds, ice-skating rinks and jacuzzis they are raking in new members.Drawbacks: Located in the suburbs, they rank low as status symbols.At Ibiza, members get to try their hand at sports like angling, boating and pool. They could use a kilometre-long, specially designed jogging track that has a cushion of sand and hollow bricks, or a mini driving and putting range.While traditional clubs would balk at the idea of a full-time disco on their premises (most are content with a special “nite” or two), the new clubs can’t imagine life without a dancing floor. Some of this is admittedly gimmicky – like the submerged pool-side bar and open-air jacuzzi at Ibiza – but members are lapping it up.While a ceiling on members seems fair, change makers feel the traditional clubs need to do some soul searching.”If the older clubs don’t move with the times, they will lose out to the new ones,” says Dutt. The picture already looks grim.advertisementMany of the better-known clubs are hamstrung by shortage of space and finances. Most of these clubs are housed in heritage buildings in the city and cannot expand or change at will.Nor do they have the funds to do so, even though members pay a monthly subscription ranging between Rs 300 and Rs 450. The Saturday Club, for instance, has an annual turnover of Rs 3.5 crore. But till April, it was spending Rs 1.75 crore on staff salaries every year. When officials suggested a cutback, a violent union forced the club to shut down for three months. Similarly, the Calcutta Club, which gets about Rs 1.5 crore from its 4,000 members every year, has to spend almost Rs 2 crore on staff salaries annually.Recently, when some members proposed a three-tier underground parking system to generate money, the idea was shot down: it would be against the philosophy of the club to go “commercial.Children’s Hall at The CircleThe new clubs have no such qualms. “Money’s not the important thing,” says Sushil Mohta of Ibiza. “I offer my members a club and four-star hotel rolled into one.” In other words, he runs it like a business.But does it matter? Deb Kumar Bose, who recently signed up at a new country club, believes the “old-world charm of the traditional clubs” doesn’t sell anymore. “I don’t care for it,” he says.”My children will care even less.” That’s a warning call to some of the older clubs, says a committee member of Tollygunge Club. “They have to shape up if they have to fend off competition,” he says. “If a club is a home away from home, no one wants an outmoded dwelling.”Least of all the wait listed.last_img read more