Benitez insists he did not hear jeers from Chelsea fans

first_imgNew manager Rafael Benitez insisted he did not hear his hostile reception from Chelsea fans.Benitez, hugely unpopular among the Blues faithful from his time as Liverpool boss, was loudly jeered.But, speaking after the 0-0 draw against Manchester City, he said he was unaffected by the reaction.“I can guarantee you because I am focused on the game I don’t hear the crowd,” he stated.“My focus is on the team and on the pitch. I was not listening. I was concentrating on the game.“It was a tough game against a top team. To see the mentality and work-rate of the players was quite positive.“Clearly you could see they were trying hard with and without the ball. You could see everyone tried to help each other.”More reaction to follow later.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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

South Africa ranks 2/115 in the 2017 OBS

first_imgJohannesburg, Tuesday 27 March 2018 –  Brand South Africa welcomes South Africa’s Performance in the 2017 Open Budget Survey (OBS) Index. South Africa ranks 2 out of 115 nations, making the country the second most transparent system after New Zealand, and leading Sweden and Norway that rank at 3rd and 4th respectively. The Open Budget Survey (OBS) is the world’s only comparative and independent assessment of fiscal transparency, oversight, and participation at the national level. The survey is carried out by independent researchers who respond to a set of factual questions in each of the 115 countries assessed. Each country’s results are then reviewed by an anonymous expert, and governments are also given an opportunity to provide their comments.  The survey examines formal participation in the budget process at the national level. The 2017 OBS also assessed the core institutions of representative democracies by evaluating novel approaches to formal public participation in budgeting. Brand South Africa’s CEO, Dr Kingsley Makhubela said: “Transparency is an important aspect of good governance, and transparent decision making is critical for the public sector to make sound decisions and investments, while also attracting Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) into the country. “Transparency creates an environment  for effective decision-making. The most frequently cited argument for transparency is  information should be accessible to enable citizens to actively participate in policymaking and hold leaders accountable for their decisions, and ultimately influence which decisions are taken and why. At a more basic level, transparency is critical for  decision-makers, as it assists them to formulate policy, improve service provision, and manage resources responsibly.” The OBS 2017 report states that ‘Sub-Saharan Africa showed the largest decline in transparency in this round, yet the region drove much of the improvement in transparency in the 2015 survey.’ It  also notes that ‘this recent decline in transparency overall is significantly less than the gains found in previous rounds of the survey; which means that  government budgets are still considerably more transparent today than they were a decade ago.’  Follow the conversation on  #CompetitiveSA  Notes to the Editor About Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship. About Play Your PartPlay Your Part is a nationwide programme created to inspire, empower and celebrate active citizenship in South Africa.  It aims to lift the spirit of our nation by inspiring all South Africans to contribute to positive change, become involved and start doing. A nation of people who care deeply for one another and the environment in which they live is good for everyone. Play Your Part is aimed at all South Africans – from corporates and individuals, NGOs and government, churches and schools, from the young to the not-so-young.  It aims to encourage South Africans to use some of their time, money, skills or goods to contribute to a better future for all.last_img read more

The Journal of Poor Homebuilding

first_imgThis photo shows the fiberglass batts surrounding an unsealed and uninsulated attic hatch. Years of excessive air movement has left gobs of crud suspended in the fiberglass fibers. Fireplace flue without a damperThis is a New England classic. So many homes in the northern U.S. predate the development of oil and gas heating; they originally had wood heating. In these homes, chimneys were basically a giant, centrally located thermal mass that helped warm the building. Moldy bathroom ceilingMoldy bathroom ceilings are all too common bathroom in cold climates. Unsealed chimney chaseThe photo of the chimney chase is taken from above, looking down. This is a gable-end chimney on a Colonial house with a garage addition. There’s a finished room over the garage, so that chimney shaft is surrounded by conditioned interior air.The chimney was framed in and drywalled. That light you see at the bottom is where the chimney shaft is open into the garage. On the right is uninsulated interior drywall. The cap is entirely unsealed, and the attic is insulated at the floor.This chimney chase alone probably accounts for 5% (if not more) of the homeowner’s heating bill.What’s the solution? Treat the top and bottom of the chimney chase as what they are: part of the building envelope. The top and bottom of the chase need to be sealed and insulated. We’ve seen some of the problems with framing around the chimney. Here’s a photo inside a fireplace flue. This flue was unused and did not have a working damper. It was a wide-open 2-square-foot hole, open year-round. The leak was obvious as hell once the blower door was running, but wasn’t very obvious to the naked eye. An uninsulated roomThis photo comes from our friends at Horizon Maine (a home-performance contractor in South Portland) who are doing the weatherization and insulation work at a home where I performed an audit. This is the space above a porch; the photo was taken after the porch ceiling was removed. There is a sitting room over the porch that the homeowner had set up as a home office. In spite of the efforts of a space heater and furnace going full blast, the temperature in this space wouldn’t get over 50°F in the winter.Now that the ceiling has been removed, what do we see?Sides of sitting room: UninsulatedUnder the room: UninsulatedSecond-floor wall (the plaster and lathe on the right): UninsulatedOver the room: 4 inches of cellulose with some knob-and-tube wiring for fun.center_img The infrared picture shows where the poorly laid fiberglass batts are causing extreme dips in the ceiling surface temperature. The temperature is dipping below the dew point, causing bathroom moisture to condense. leading to surface mold growth. Yummy!Mold: check. Infrared camera showing why there’s mold: check. Asbestos-insulated boilerThis isn’t poor home building so much as a former best practice that didn’t turn out. At one time, asbestos was a miracle substance: a great insulator, nearly indestructible in residential applications, and impervious to fire. I mean, stone fibers don’t exactly light with a matchstick.From an energy history standpoint, this is a neat boiler. Shrouded in asbestos, it is a former coal boiler that was converted first to oil and later to natural gas. Surprisingly, the asbestos is in near-perfect shape, 60 years on.Unfortunately, many times miracle substances are too good to be true. Dirty fiberglass battOh, attic hatches … One of the most common symptoms of a problematic attic hatch is dirt and dust getting caught in the fiberglass insulation surrounding it. As some auditors say: as an insulation, fiberglass is an excellent air filter. I’m calling this collection of photos The Journal of Poor Homebuilding — kind of like Holmes on Homes, except that I won’t act like the previous contractors ought to be hunted down, predator-style.I had some other ideas for naming it before settling on JoPH (though they are all the same basic joke): Energy Rearguard, Home Energy Amateurs, Journal of Light Destruction, or the Building Magic Corporation. (As a side note, I love the sites on which these parodies are based and highly recommend reading them). Erik North, the owner of Free Energy Maine, is an energy auditor and home performance specialist in Westbrook, Maine. He is also the author of the Energy Auditing Blog.last_img read more

Is Business Headed for a Cognitive-First Future?

first_imgFollow the Puck Brad AndersonEditor In Chief at ReadWrite How Data Analytics Can Save Lives Related Posts AI: How it’s Impacting Surveillance Data Storage Tags:#data#Trending Brad is the editor overseeing contributed content at ReadWrite.com. He previously worked as an editor at PayPal and Crunchbase. You can reach him at brad at readwrite.com. As the world generates more and more data — at a clip of 2.5 quintillion bytes each day — it simultaneously struggles to manage it. With humans unable to manually process such large amounts of data and analyze its implications, the business world has to turn to machines to take on some of the load.Smart machines can transform data points into patterns and insights; imbuing these machines with human knowledge and allowing them to “learn” from the additional information they gather can speed up the computations needed by businesses. Cognitive machines aren’t just reactive, however. With enough data, they can anticipate problems, suggest solutions, and carry them out without human intervention.Cognitive predictive maintenance for the Industrial Internet of Things, an arena in which machines detect failures in other machines, is poised to influence whole industries. Empowering machines to perform unsupervised (or partially supervised) techniques to identify equipment failures quickly and accurately will save money for businesses. From preventing downtime to freeing up employee time for higher-level issues, cognitive predictive maintenance will revolutionize how enterprises handle asset management.Thy Machine’s Will Be DoneCognitive predictive maintenance uses sensors and artificial intelligence to monitor operations of complex systems, giving early warning in the form of anomaly detection. This early detection can help address minor issues before they turn into more serious problems.Deep reinforcement learning, a component of many cognitive predictive maintenance systems, uses algorithms to determine which pieces of information — gathered from resources such as manuals and operator notes or through real-time happenings — are relevant. Combining these with feedback received from a company’s techs, these autonomous solutions will create a library of knowledge without human input — beyond the manual feedback, of course.“The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is unlocking new possibilities for asset-intensive industries. … Sadly, almost 85 percent of these industries let this data sourced from trillions of data points go unused,” explain the experts at DataRPM, a Progress company, considered a cognitive disruptor in the IIoT maintenance space. “Only the remaining 15 percent possess the capabilities to derive insights from the limited data sourced from a select few sensors. This leads to building generalized models that encompass only a few assets, which are then extrapolated to the entire asset population.”And that’s a big deal: DataRPM has calculated that a 1 percent improvement in productivity across the manufacturing industry can result in $500 million in annual savings. Predicting anomalies can result in a 70 percent elimination of breakdowns, the firm says. With McKinsey predicting the IoT industry will have an economic impact of approximately $11 trillion by 2025, that’s a lot of potential money left on the table without cognitive-first processes.Which Industries Will Benefit?The saying that “data is the new oil” has gained momentum in recent years, and even the oil industry should feel that way. It’s one of a handful of industries that stand to quickly benefit from cognitive predictive maintenance.Oil and gas. With decades-old pipelines, old technology, and dangerous terrain, the oil and gas industry is ripe for machine intervention. Its outsized impact on the environment underscores the importance of predicting failures before they happen. Updated sensors and data analysis can result in not only avoided tragedies, but also 10 percent cost savings through enhanced performance.Manufacturing. Factories are constantly on the lookout for ways to improve their analytics and equipment effectiveness. Cognitive predictive maintenance can help with both these areas, as well as with conducting cognitive visual inspections. Deloitte’s findings suggest that cognitive predictive maintenance helps manufacturing equipment achieve more than 90 percent effectiveness.Automotive. Just like other manufacturing arenas, automotive companies are searching for ways to increase the uptime of their assembly lines and decrease malfunctions and subsequent recalls. Although only 8 percent of automotive manufacturers currently use cognitive predictive maintenance, these companies could save more than $1 million per day by issuing recalls sooner.Aviation. Unsurprisingly, nearly every transportation and logistics industry can benefit from cognitive-first solutions, and aviation’s tight regulations, safety concerns, and replacement schedules make cognitive predictive maintenance a perfect fit. With an aircraft like the A350-900 costing nearly $305 million, it’s clear that downtime for any part of an airline’s fleet can be devastating. Cognitive predictive maintenance can help airlines take care of problems before they need to ground flights.Energy and utilities. With the environment and climate changing rapidly, extreme weather power outages doubled between 2003 and 2012; extreme weather is considered the culprit behind 80 percent of outages. In a society becoming further chained to the internet and machines on a daily basis, energy and utility companies would do well to adopt cognitive predictive maintenance, which can help them predict and manage blackouts and brownouts before they happen.Producing enormous amounts of data means we also need to build systems that can absorb and use that data. Industries that need to process such data before major problems occur likely have a cognitive-first future ahead of them, led by machines smart enough to fix what isn’t yet broken. Leveraging Big Data that Data Websites Should T…last_img read more

Not consulted on demolition around Jagannath temple: Puri Shankaracharya

first_imgShankaracharya of Puri Swami Nischalananda Saraswati on Saturday said the Odisha government took a unilateral decision to demolish structures within 75-metre radius of Shree Jagannath Temple and he was not consulted on this important matter.Terming the ongoing demolition a conspiracy, the seer said the committee headed by former Orissa High Court Judge B.P. Das neither met him nor consulted him. The committee had suggested clearing the area around the 12th century temple of encroachments for its security.The Jagannath temple affairs should be regulated by religious processes and mutts’ activities follow similar process, he said.The seer’s reaction came in the wake of ongoing demolition of the 12th century Emar Mutt, close to the temple. Even as the eviction drive is under way, mutt Mahant Rajgopal Ramanuj Dash has been protesting the move and refused to vacate the structure.last_img read more

Ankle arthroscopy

first_imgDefinitionAnkle arthroscopy is surgery that uses a tiny camera and surgical tools to examine or repair the tissues inside or around your ankle. The camera is called an arthroscope. The procedure allows the doctor to detect problems and make repairs to your ankle without making larger cuts in the skin and tissue. This means that you may have less pain and recover more quickly.Alternative NamesAnkle surgeryDescriptionYou will likely receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means you will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Or, you may have regional anesthesia. Your leg and ankle area will be numbed so that you do not feel any pain. If you receive regional anesthesia, you will also be given medicine to make you very sleepy during the operation.During the procedure, the surgeon does the following:Inserts the arthroscope into your ankle through a small incision. The scope is connected to a video monitor in the operating room. This allows the surgeon to view the inside of your ankle.Inspects all the tissues of your ankle. These tissues include cartilage, bones, tendons, and ligaments.Repairs any damaged tissues. To do this, your surgeon makes 1 to 3 more small incisions and inserts other instruments through them. A tear in a muscle, tendon, or cartilage is fixed. Any damaged tissue is removed.At the end of the surgery, the incisions will be closed with stitches and covered with a dressing (bandage). Most surgeons take pictures from the video monitor during the procedure to show you what they found and what repairs they made.advertisementYour surgeon may need to do open surgery if there is a lot of damage. Open surgery means you will have a large incision so that the surgeon can get directly to your bones and tissues.Why the Procedure Is DoneArthroscopy may be recommended for these ankle problems:Ankle pain: Arthroscopy allows the surgeon to explore what is causing your ankle pain.Ligament tears: A ligament is a band of tissue that connects bone to bone. Several ligaments in the ankle help keep it stable and allow it to move. Torn ligaments can be repaired with this type of surgery.Ankle impingement: Tissues in your ankle can become swollen and sore from overuse. This makes it hard to move the joint. Arthroscopy can remove the tissue so you can move your joint.Scar tissue:This can form after an injury to the ankle. This surgery can remove scar tissue.Arthritis: Arthroscopy can be used to help reduce pain and improve movement.Cartilage injuries: This surgery can be used to diagnose or repair cartilage and bone injuries.Risks Risks of general anesthesia are:Allergic reactions to medicinesBreathing problemsRisks of ankle arthroscopy are:BleedingInfectionBlood clotFailure of surgery to relieve symptomsFailure of repair to healWeakness of the ankleInjury to tendon, blood vessel, or nerveBefore the ProcedureTell your health care provider what medicines you are taking. This includes medicines, supplements, or herbs you bought without a prescription.During the 2 weeks before your surgery:You may be asked to stop taking medicines that make it harder for your blood to clot. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve), and other medicines.Ask your health care provider which medicines you should still take on the day of your surgery.If you have diabetes, heart disease, or other medical conditions, your surgeon will ask you to see your doctor who treats you for these conditions.Tell your health care provider if you have been drinking a lot of alcohol, more than 1 or 2 drinks a day.If you smoke, try to stop. Ask your health care provider or nurse for help. Smoking can slow wound and bone healing.Tell your doctor about any cold, flu, fever, herpes breakout, or other illness you may have before your surgery.On the day of surgery:You will likely be asked not to drink or eat anything for 6 to 12 hours before the procedure.Take the medicines your health care provider told you to take with a small sip of water.Your health care provider will tell you when to arrive at the hospital. Be sure to arrive on time.After the ProcedureYou can usually go home the same day after you recover from the anesthesia. You should have someone drive you home.Keep your ankle elevated above your heart for two to three days to help reduce swelling and pain. You can also apply cold packs to reduce swelling.Keep your bandage clean and dry. Your health care provider can show you how to change the dressing.You can take pain relievers, if needed, as long as your doctor says its safe to do so.Youll need to use a walker or crutches and keep weight off your foot.Outlook (Prognosis)advertisementArthroscopy uses small cuts in the skin. Compared to regular surgery, you may have:Less pain and stiffnessFewer complicationsFaster recoveryThe small cuts will heal quickly, and you may be able to resume your normal activities in a few days. However, if your doctor had to repair a lot of tissue in your ankle, it may take several weeks to heal. How quickly you heal depends on how complicated the surgery was.You may be shown how to do gentle exercises as you heal. Or, your doctor may recommend that you see a physical therapist to help you regain the full use of your ankle.ReferencesIshikawa S. Arthroscopy of the Foot and Ankle. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbells Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 50.Miller M, Hart J. Surgical Principles. In DeLee, JC, Drez D Jr, Miller MD, eds. DeLee and Drezs Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2009:chap 2.Review Date:5/15/2013Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.last_img read more