Drinking coffee may decrease depression risk in women

first_img Read Full Story A new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers found that, among women, drinking coffee may reduce the risk of depression. The researchers, led by Michel Lucas, research fellow in nutrition, found the risk of depression to be 20% lower among women who drank four or more cups of caffeinated coffee than those who drank little or none. Those who drank decaf, tea, soft drinks, chocolate and other beverages containing less caffeine did not appear to be protected against depression. The study, “Coffee, Caffeine, and Risk of Depression Among Women,” was published in the September 26, 2011, issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.At least one previous prospective study in men suggested a link between depression risk and coffee, the world’s most popular central nervous system stimulant, according to the authors.The researchers studied 50,739 women who participated in the Nurses’ Health Study. The women, whose average age was 63, were free of depression when the study began in 1996. The scientists prospectively followed the women’s use of caffeinated and noncaffeinated beverages, and chocolate (which contains small amounts of caffeine) for the previous year through June 2006.Senior author Alberto Ascherio, professor of  epidemiology and nutrition, told the New York Times that more research is needed before the authors can recommend women drink more coffee.last_img read more

Notre Dame hosts annual Energy Week

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Anne Pillai South Bend mayor Pete Buttigieg, left and Carmel, Indiana, mayor James Brainard speak at an event about designing smart cities during last year’s Energy Week. This year’s Energy Week started Monday.Anne Berges Pillai, education and outreach associate program director at ND Energy and one of the organizers of Energy Week, said one of the week’s major goals is to spread knowledge about energy and related issues to students and parts of campus who may not otherwise be exposed to the topic.“We definitely want to get as many people engaged as we can,” she said. “This year especially, we have a lot of topics that are related a lot to policy to try and engage parts of campus that maybe haven’t really thought about energy that much before.”In keeping with this goal, the events constituting Energy Week will engage a diverse number of energy related topics. For instance, there will be a lecture delivered by a guest speaker from Kodiak, Alaska, one of only five places in the United States which uses nearly 100 percent renewable electricity. There will also be a guest speaker from Puerto Rico, as well as a showing of a documentary on Hurricane Maria. Both events are meant to examine the power situation on the island.It’s important to be informed about energy and how it works, especially considering that many important energy decisions take place on a local, rather than federal level, Pillai said. This issue was at the center of a talk hosted during last year’s Energy Week between South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Mayor James Brainard from Carmel, Ind.Breanna Belz, a junior on the student energy board, said Energy Week programming has a wide focus. “Of course we have a lot of people from the College of Science and Engineering who deliver lots of technical talks about different forms of energy, but then we also have a lot of people from the College of Business that are big names and that a lot of our students know who talk more on the policy side and the business side,” Belz said. “Like how can these different methods of energy generation succeed? It’s not all about the science, a lot of it is implementation, politics, companies and money.”While many of the events and topics will be especially relevant to students studying energy, sustainability, business and economics, energy is a topic that affects everyone and one that everyone should be informed about, Pillai explained.“We have been reaching out and trying to convince everyone that they can play a role, either as an intelligent citizen who knows about the issues or by doing what they can in their own home,” she said. “It’s a personal responsibility thing, it doesn’t matter what your major is.”Tags: Energy Week, sustainability, Sustainable energy This week marks the beginning of the 12th ND Energy Week, a series of talks and events meant to raise awareness about energy and sustainability across campus.These events will include lectures from both Notre Dame professors and guest speakers, tours of power facilities and documentaries and interactive talks about what it’s like to work in the energy sector. All events are designed to inform students from all majors about different kinds of energy as well as the business and policies that surround energy and sustainability. last_img read more

The kids are alright

first_imgMillennials are not saving, but holiday spending is up. by: Marc RapportThe holidays are here. It’s a cheery time, full of family and friends … and the gnashing of teeth about the spending and saving habits of the body politic.That casualty-free blood sport includes annual forecasts on holiday spending, such as the 15th annual survey from CUNA and the Consumer Federation of America. This year, it found that 33% of Americans said they would shell out more this year than last.Not very promising from the growth-is-good perspective, but the big trade does point out that less people are reporting they’re spending less than in the past several years. Heck, 55% said they were in the 2008 survey, during the height of the recession.“Top-line results from an economic perspective are encouraging and holiday spending almost certainly will increase this year,” says Mike Schenk, CUNA senior economist. “However, elements of our survey underscore the fact many consumers continue to reflect significant concerns about their personal finances — most especially in the realm of weak income gains.”Indeed, nearly half of the respondents — a representative cross section of 1,009 Americans questioned by phone Oct. 30-Nov. 2 — say they would not have an extra $1,000 needed to pay an unexpected expense. Lower-income households also reported much smaller income gains than higher-income households, the survey found, adding to the nation’s growing gap between haves and have-nots. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

New partnership formed in Norway to reduce fuel consumption and emissions for offshore ops

first_img“The partnership is focused on building a platform for intelligent efficiency, made possible only through the integration of operational, information and communication technologies,” said Eirik Mathiesen, Director of Energy Products Integration, Kongsberg Maritime.“Encompassing IoT, new smart sensors on board will stream accurate data to the cloud-based DSS, where deep analysis with intuitive presentation and application will drive equitable and predictable operational performance.”“Going ‘smart’ is integral to maintaining our position as the number one OSV ship manager today and into the future, in a sustainable way,” said Lars Christian Larsen, Senior Project Manager for Energy Management, DOF.“Smart is not just deploying the right technologies. Developing our culture to focus even more on sustainable operations with minimal environmental impact will be as important as the technology we create with Kongsberg, SINTEF Ocean and NORCE. DOF’s maritime experience together with the collection of big data in an operationally logical way will ensure success.”“Information is power, and when that information relates directly to power consumption, it can revolutionize vessel operations, from onboard electrical load management to route optimization for passage by sea,” said Anders Valland, Research Manager, Maritime Energy Systems, SINTEF Ocean.“This is an exciting project that strengthens Norway’s position as the world’s leading offshore and maritime innovator with focus on efficient and sustainable operations.”Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Offshore Energy Today, established in 2010, is read by over 10,000 industry professionals daily. We had nearly 9 million page views in 2018, with 2.4 million new users. This makes us one of the world’s most attractive online platforms in the space of offshore oil and gas and allows our partners to get maximum exposure for their online campaigns. If you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today contact our marketing manager Mirza Duran for advertising options. Norwegian offshore vessel owner DOF has formed a partnership with Kongsberg Maritime, SINTEF Ocean, and NORCE, which aims to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions for complex offshore operations, while streamlining fleet-wide maintenance.For illustration: One of DOF’s vessels. Author: Alan JamiesonEnabled through sponsorship and support from Innovation Norway, the new partnership between four of Norway’s maritime organizations will develop a sophisticated new Decision Support System (DSS) for offshore vessel operations, DOF said in a statement on Monday.“This new predictive, intelligent, and dynamic guidance tool will act as the foundation for DOF to simplify operational complexity with objective measurement, ultimately enabling optimal utilization and more sustainable fleet management,” the company explained.Highlighting the potential of the partnership to catalyze a tangible transformation, the multi-year project is backed with Innovation Norway’s largest funded offshore vessel, environmental technology project in 2018.DOF said that it will be a game-changer in how marine operational decisions are supported by providing more accurate, timely, and easily consumable information to decision makers; from the vessel’s Chief Engineer to the Chief Operation Officer based shore-side. ‘Going smart’ last_img read more