Arranmore man 26.2 miles from completing all World Major marathons

first_imgDenis O’Donnell has once again embarked on a trip halfway around the world to take part in the Boston World Major Marathon.He completed the gruelling marathon in a time of 4 hours 22 minutes, an impressive feat when you take into consideration how many hills are in the route.It nows means the Arranmore man has completed five out of the six World Major marathons challenges after Boston, London, New York, Chicago and Tokyo. Denis O’Donnell competing in the Boston Marathon 2019O’Donnell, who has completed 11 marathons in total, now aims to take on his final World Major marathons challenge in Berlin in September.In 2018, Denis had taken on the challenge of the Tokyo Marathon in memory of his mother Frances who passed away in April 2017, while also raising vital funds for the Irish Heart Foundation.Speaking to Donegal Daily at the time, O’Donnell said: “I’d like to do all six, that’s been the target since I started running.“I wasn’t big into fitness as a child or adult, it’s been in the last seven years I have progressed from the treadmill at the local gym, to doing local 5k and 10ks. When I got into it I started thinking more about what I was eating and started tweaking things.” Since he endeavours on America’s east coast, O’Donnell has returned to the Island to organise the Darkness into Light event for the fourth straight year.Denis is the driving force behind Arranmore’s Darkness into Light walk, which raises vital funds for Pieta House.This years event takes place on May 11th at 4.15am starting at the community centre, with a late ferry at 3am coming to the island for the event and returning afterwards.“Running brings about other things, it can bring everyone together,” O’Donnell said.“Darkness into Light became the whole community’s thing and everyone has a part to play in it. It brings everyone out at a crazy time in the morning and everyone gets a really good buzz from it.” Arranmore man 26.2 miles from completing all World Major marathons was last modified: April 28th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

South Africa upgrades birth certificates

first_img5 March 2013 Nkosinathi Dludla and his wife Patricia on Monday became the first South African parents to receive an unabridged birth certificate for their new baby boy, Sakhile. Home Affairs Minister Naledi Pandor visited the young couple at Netcare Park Lane Hospital in Johannesburg to hand them an unabridged birth certificate for their four-day old son. South Africa’s new birth certificates contain details of both parents along with added security features that will make duplication much more difficult. Pandor said her department would no longer issue abridged birth certificates, as part of a move to secure the integrity of South Africa’s National Population Register, and to eradicate identity book theft and fraudulent birth registrations. “This initiative will really give us a chance of having a national population register that we all trust and which we can use for planning service provision,” Pandor said. “As from today, all [newborn] babies will be receiving unabridged certificates, and our wish is to issue them on the spot, but at the most it will be within 30 days.” The certificates will be issued at no cost to first-time applicants. Existing abridged certificates will, however, continue to remain legal documents. Speaking to SAnews at her hospital bed, Patricia Dludla said: “Being the first mother in the country to receive these new birth certificates, it is a real honour to me. I feel so special.” Pandor also issued an unabridged certificate to Silulami Libalele, whose baby girl, Dala, was born on Saturday. “Together with my wife, we are very excited by the department’s move to issue this new birth certificate to our baby without us travelling to their offices,” said Libalele, adding that his daughter’s name, Dala, means “to create”. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Minister Michael Masutha on the matter of International Criminal Court and Sudanese President Omar Al Bashir

first_imgPresident Jacob Zuma and President Omar Al-Bashir of Sudan discuss strengthening relations between South Africa and Sudan, 2 September 2015. (Photo: GCIS)We have called this press conference to announce the decision taken by Cabinet on Wednesday, 19 October 2016 in relation to the country’s membership to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and the pending appeal regarding Sudanese President Al Bashir.The Republic of South Africa is a founder member of the African Union and plays an important role in resolving conflicts on the African continent and in encouraging the peaceful resolution of conflicts wherever they occur anywhere else in the world.In exercising its international relations with foreign countries, particularly with countries in which serious conflicts occur or have occurred, South Africa is hindered by the Implementation of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court Act, 2 (Act No 27 of 2002). This Act and the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court compel South Africa to arrest persons who may enjoy diplomatic immunity under customary international law but who are wanted by the International Criminal Court for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and to surrender such persons to the International Criminal Court. South Africa has to do so, even under circumstances where we are actively involved in promoting peace, stability and dialogue in those countries.We wish to give effect to the rule of customary international law which recognises the diplomatic immunity of heads of state and others in order to effectively promote dialogue and the peaceful resolution of conflicts wherever they may occur, particularly on the African continent. South Africa enacted the Diplomatic Immunities and Privileges Act,  (Act No. 37 of 2001), which provides for the immunities and privileges of diplomatic missions and consular posts and their members, of heads of states, special envoys and certain representatives of the United Nations and its specialised agencies, other international organisations and certain other persons.However, the Implementation of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court Act, 2002, is in conflict and inconsistent with the provisions of the Diplomatic Immunities and Privileges Act, 2001. In order to ensure South Africa’s continued ability to conduct active diplomatic relations, a bill proposing the repeal of the Implementation of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court Act, 2002 will soon be tabled in parliament. We have already in writing informed the Speaker of the National Assembly and the Chairperson of the NCOP of this Executive decision.In the matter of the Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development v The Southern African Litigation Centre (867/15) [2016] ZASCA 17 (15 March 2016), the Supreme Court of Appeal confirmed that in terms of customary international law, heads of state enjoy immunity against arrest. However, the Supreme Court of Appeal found that in enacting the Implementation of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court Act, 2002, South Africa had expressly waived the immunity of such heads of state and that South Africa was obliged to arrest persons wanted for crimes committed against humanity.In essence, the Supreme Court of Appeal identified the problem which needs to be addressed. The effect of withdrawal from the Rome Statute as well as the repeal of the Implementation Act thus completes the removal of all legal impediments inhibiting South Africa’s ability to honour its obligations relating to the granting of diplomatic immunity under international law as provided for under our domestic legislation. This therefore removes the necessity at least in so far as this aspect is concerned of continuing with the appeal.Written notice to withdraw from the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court has been submitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations in accordance with Article 127(1) of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. The withdrawal will take effect one year after the Secretary-General has received the notification. South African will remain obligated under the Rome Statute for the duration of the 12 months’ notice period.An application for leave to appeal the decision of the Supreme Court of Appeal set down for hearing at the Constitutional Court on 22 November 2016, will now be withdrawn. This is so, especially as the Supreme Court of Appeal has removed the uncertainty around customary international law in relation to diplomatic immunity in so far as it affects heads of states and others who may be wanted for serious violations of human rights and other serious crimes but who enjoy diplomatic immunity under international customary law.South Africa remains committed to the fight against impunity and to hold those who have committed crimes against humanity and other serious crimes accountable. Our unwavering commitment to the promotion and protection of human rights throughout Africa and elsewhere in the world is further demonstrated by our continued participation in various international and continental human rights instruments.For this reason, South Africa will work closely with the African Union and with other countries in Africa to strengthen continental bodies, such as the African Court on Human and People’s Rights, created to deal with such crimes and to prosecute the perpetrators, whilst at the same time continuing to participate and honour its commitments under international human rights instruments. South Africa will continue to actively promote dialogue and the peaceful resolution of conflicts on the African continent and elsewhere.Enquiries:Mthunzi MhagaSpokesperson for the Ministry of Justice and Correctional servicesCell: 083 641 8141E-mail: Mediaenquiries@justice.gov.zaIssued by:Department of Justice and Constitutional Developmentlast_img read more

South African companies play their part for economic growth at the inaugural Accenture Innovation Awards

first_imgJOHANNESBURG, October 1o 2013 – Brand South Africa Board member Geoff Rothschild today joined a panel of judges at the Accenture Innovation Awards at which South African companies showcased innovative concepts of leading South African companies.Speaking from the event, Geoff Rothschild said, “The 190 entries being showcased at the inaugural Accenture Innovation Index reflects positively on South Africa’s entrepreneurial spirit and ability to respond to the changing business and social environment in the country.”“This spirit is also attested to by South Africa’s ranking on the innovation pillar in the 2013 World Economic Forum’s Competitive Index.  South Africa improved its ranking from 42 in 2012 to 39 in 2013.  Entrepreneurship and innovation is key to driving development and economic growth in countries.”“The Accenture Innovation Awards also highlights the commitment of South African business to strengthening and growing the South African economy while responding to changing conditions in the country.”“The high level participation at this event truly inspires new ways of business doing business in a developing economy,” concluded Mr Rothschild.About Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness abroad. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship.Further resources from Brand South AfricaMedia are invited to visit http://www.southafrica.info/ for further resources which can be reproduced without any copyright infringement.  Kindly attribute to Brand South Africa.For more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Nadia Samie-JacobsPublic Relations DomesticTel: +27 11 712 5007 Mobile: +27 (0)72 777 9399Email: nadias@brandsouthafrica.comVisit www.brandsouthafrica.comEndslast_img read more

1,065 candidates in fray for BDC polls in Jammu & Kashmir

first_imgAfter the final withdrawal of nomination papers, 1,065 candidates are in fray for the October 24 Block Development Council (BDC) polls in Jammu and Kashmir, State election officials said on Saturday.853 Independents “A total of 1,092 nominations, including 853 Independents, were found eligible after the scrutiny and withdrawal, out of which 27 candidates were elected unopposed as chairpersons, leaving 1,065 in the fray,” the officials said. The highest number of 101 candidates are trying their luck from north Kashmir’s Kupwara district, followed by nearby Baramulla (90), Jammu (82), Rajouri (76), Doda (74), Kathua (72) Udhampur and Budgam (58 each), Kishtwar (44), Ramban (43) and Reasi (39), they said. The officials said Leh and Kargil districts together accounted for 74 candidates — 38 from Kargil and 36 from Leh, while Shopian district in south Kashmir has the lowest number of only four candidates. Another five candidates are in fray from Srinagar district. Polls in 310 blocksThere are 316 blocks in the State, out of these two are without elected panches or Sarpanches besides, four blocks have been reserved for women and there are no women candidates. Thus, the elections would be held in 310 blocks on October 24. All necessary arrangements have been made by the authorities for the smooth conduct of elections, the officials said. They said there would be one polling station for one BDC, and accordingly, 310 polling stations have been set up in the State, one in each block where elections are to be held. There are 26,629 voters, of which 8,313 are women and 18,316 men for all the 316 blocks across the 22 districts of J&K, the officials said, adding that the ballot boxes will be used during the polls as the election shall be held through secret ballot.last_img read more

UST rookie Alessandrini set to miss rest of 1st round due to shoulder injury

first_imgChief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST PLAY LIST 01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Read Next According to a source, doctors in UST told Reyes to give rest Alesssandrini even before the Ateneo game but the magnitude of the match became a necessity for the rookie to be put in the lineup.Despite the hurting shoulder, Alessandrini was still able to put up 11 points, one point shy of her 12-point average prior to the duel.Reyes said it will be up to the rest of the team to carry the scoring load and lift UST from its 1-2 record.“I won’t gamble it anymore, the other players will have to step up because if I played Alessandrini even more she might be sidelined for an even longer period,” said Reyes.ADVERTISEMENT The Golden Tigresses not only lost libero Rica Rivera due to injury, but also their prized rookie Milena Alessandrini.UST head coach Kung Fu Reyes said Sunday that Alessandrini will be out for the rest of the first round after the Filipino-Italian spiker suffered a partial tear in her right shoulder.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“She has a strain on her right shoulder but she still tried to fight earlier,” said Reyes in Filipino after their four-set loss to Ateneo, 25-16m 22-25, 22-25, 23-25, at Filoil Flying V Centre. “Despite her injury, she still has the drive and the willingness.”“If you’re injured, no matter what you try to do you will be hurt but she fought until the end.” 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers LATEST STORIES John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Racal, Cruz take blame for Alaska loss to NLEX Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PHcenter_img University of Santo Tomas’ campaign in the UAAP Season 80 women’s volleyball tournament is off to a rough start.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC AFP official booed out of forum Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH View commentslast_img read more

Rash of new clubs in Kolkata takes over from traditional ones with style and panache

first_imgLIVING IT UP: The pool-side barArchana Agarwal’s children work as hard as her. Since the HR manager at Tata Tea in Kolkata keeps busy, she has enrolled her children in a school-cum-creche. Guilty, Agarwal decided to join a club, hoping her children could catch up on some outdoor activities.She tried,LIVING IT UP: The pool-side barArchana Agarwal’s children work as hard as her. Since the HR manager at Tata Tea in Kolkata keeps busy, she has enrolled her children in a school-cum-creche. Guilty, Agarwal decided to join a club, hoping her children could catch up on some outdoor activities.She tried three of the city’s best places, but didn’t make it. While two clubs told her they were too full, the third informed that her membership might take a decade. “I can’t wait that long,” she says. “My children will grow up by then.”Entrepreneur Ravi Arora had a different experience though he is in the same boat. When he wanted to join one of the better known clubs in Kolkata, a member of its managing committee promised to push his application for a generous fee.”I was asked for Rs 1 lakh even though the membership fee is a little over Rs 50,000,” says a disgusted Arora. Like Agarwal and Arora, there are at least 10,000 people who have been waiting long to get into one or the other of Kolkata’s 10 best clubs, a recent IMRB study reveals. Some of them have been on the list for over a decade. The good news is that a rash of new clubs are cashing in on this lopsided demand-and-supply situation and are fast weaning away the wannabes. While Agarwal is now a member of Ibiza, a new country club 25 km from the city, Arora is part of The Circle, which opened in 1999.A month into operations, Ibiza has notched up 300 takers, each paying Rs 60,000. The Space Circle, which has not even opened yet and has a steeper membership fee of Rs 1.1 lakh, already has four times that number on its rolls.advertisementThere’s also the highway-skirting Lake land Country Club, besides some others in the pipeline: Princeton, another venture by the group which owns Ibiza, and Country Roads, a farmhouse complex with a club, which will be operational by the year 2003.The billiards room at IbizaThe well-heeled Kolkatan, for whom clubbing is a colonial hangover, couldn’t have asked for more. With fewer watering holes than other metros, the club is an essential hangout in Kolkata for taking the family out for a Sunday lunch, entertaining prospective clients or getting sporty on the weekend. “Wherever the British set foot, the first thing they did was to set up a club,” writes novelist Budhadev Guha.The penchant for clubbing is so strong that membership of one or more of the city’s prestigious clubs has come to dictate one’s social standing. Most of Kolkata’s turn-of-the-century clubs had been the preserve of the Brown Sahib till the 1960s.Now everyone wants to be a part of that charmed circle, forcing the clubs to tighten membership norms. While Bengal Club targets only the top company executives, Calcutta Club bars women and under-30s as members.The Calcutta Cricket and Football Club, the Royal Calcutta Golf Club and South Club prefer entrants with a sports background. Others cite legal reasons. According to air commodore (retd) K.B. Menon, managing member of the Tollygunge Club, the club’s charter forbids more than 1,500 permanent members. “And rightly so,” he adds. “A club is an extension of my home. I would like only the people I could bring home to be around me at the club.”That leaves a huge chunk of young people – teens, yuppies, middle-level executives – with virtually nowhere to go. “The new clubs recognise this and are cashing in on it,” says A.K. Dutt, former president of several of the city’s traditional clubs.The facilities they offer reflect this. Space Circle is investing big money in a 7,000-sq ft indoor cricket ground, rollerblading and ice- skating rinks and a two-storey practice rock for mountaineering buffs. The Circle already has never-before perks like an art gallery and a huge children’s room equipped with nannies. Glossing over TraditionThe Calcutta ClubOld HauntsAdvantages: A home away from home, the colonial clubs have an old-world charm about them.Drawbacks: Hemmed in by financial and space constraints, they offer few facilities and fewer memberships.New EntrantsAdvantages: With never-before features like indoor cricket grounds, ice-skating rinks and jacuzzis they are raking in new members.Drawbacks: Located in the suburbs, they rank low as status symbols.At Ibiza, members get to try their hand at sports like angling, boating and pool. They could use a kilometre-long, specially designed jogging track that has a cushion of sand and hollow bricks, or a mini driving and putting range.While traditional clubs would balk at the idea of a full-time disco on their premises (most are content with a special “nite” or two), the new clubs can’t imagine life without a dancing floor. Some of this is admittedly gimmicky – like the submerged pool-side bar and open-air jacuzzi at Ibiza – but members are lapping it up.While a ceiling on members seems fair, change makers feel the traditional clubs need to do some soul searching.”If the older clubs don’t move with the times, they will lose out to the new ones,” says Dutt. The picture already looks grim.advertisementMany of the better-known clubs are hamstrung by shortage of space and finances. Most of these clubs are housed in heritage buildings in the city and cannot expand or change at will.Nor do they have the funds to do so, even though members pay a monthly subscription ranging between Rs 300 and Rs 450. The Saturday Club, for instance, has an annual turnover of Rs 3.5 crore. But till April, it was spending Rs 1.75 crore on staff salaries every year. When officials suggested a cutback, a violent union forced the club to shut down for three months. Similarly, the Calcutta Club, which gets about Rs 1.5 crore from its 4,000 members every year, has to spend almost Rs 2 crore on staff salaries annually.Recently, when some members proposed a three-tier underground parking system to generate money, the idea was shot down: it would be against the philosophy of the club to go “commercial.Children’s Hall at The CircleThe new clubs have no such qualms. “Money’s not the important thing,” says Sushil Mohta of Ibiza. “I offer my members a club and four-star hotel rolled into one.” In other words, he runs it like a business.But does it matter? Deb Kumar Bose, who recently signed up at a new country club, believes the “old-world charm of the traditional clubs” doesn’t sell anymore. “I don’t care for it,” he says.”My children will care even less.” That’s a warning call to some of the older clubs, says a committee member of Tollygunge Club. “They have to shape up if they have to fend off competition,” he says. “If a club is a home away from home, no one wants an outmoded dwelling.”Least of all the wait listed.last_img read more