Maverley hold Waterhouse

first_imgNeighbouring communities Maverley-Hughenden and Waterhouse FC battled to a 1-1 draw in their first meeting in the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) at the Waterhouse Stadium yesterday. Phillip Peddie handed Maverley-Hughenden the lead when he slotted into an unprotected goal in the 10th minute. However, Waterhouse fought back and got the equaliser from substitute Kemar Beckford in the 54th minute. The point lifted Maverley-Hughenden to nine from eight games while Waterhouse moved to seven points in the 12-team league. The visitors, with their massive support as they made the short trek over, celebrated early when Peddie benefited from a play created by striker Nicholas Scott. The latter beat Waterhouse goalkeeper George Brown and the ball fell kindly to Peddie. Beckford came off the bench and scored shortly after he entered the pitch. THIRD GOAL UWI FC 4 Boys’ Town 0 Waterhouse 1 Maverley-Hughenden 1 Jamalco 1 Tivoli Gardens 2 Portmore United 1 FC Reno 1 Yesterday’s results Peddie, who was scoring his third goal in the last three consecutive games, was happy that his team did not lose to their neighbours. “We are getting there as a team. We did not win today but it is on the road, so we picked up a good point,” Peddie, who missed his team’s first three games and the pre-season because he was away in the United States, told The Gleaner. Maverley-Hughenden’s head coach, Lijyasu Simms, expressed disappointment in his team’s sixth draw in eight games. “I am disappointed as we deserved three points today. We are creating chances but not putting them away,” Simms said after the game. Waterhouse’s coach, Michael Francis, was satisfied with the result. “We played a disciplined game and stayed behind the ball. It’s important that we did not lose,” said Francis. The game between Montego Bay United and Arnett Gardens, which was scheduled for Wes Pow Park in St James, was postponed due to a waterlogged field. “The new match date will be communicated,” a release from the Professional Football Association of Jamaica stated.last_img read more

Bush vetoes child health plan bill

first_imgAbout 65,000 children in Los Angeles County could be affected, along with thousands more who would have qualified under the expanded bill. It was only the fourth veto of Bush’s presidency, and one that some Republicans feared could carry steep risks for their party in next year’s elections. The Senate approved the bill with enough votes to override the veto, but the margin in the House fell short of the required number. Democrats unleashed a stream of harsh rhetoric, as they geared up for a battle to both improve their chances of winning a veto override and score political points against Republicans who oppose the expansion.”We remain committed to making SCHIP into law – with or without the president’s support,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., referring to the full name of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. The White House sought little attention for Bush’s action, with the president casting his veto behind closed doors without any fanfare or news coverage. He defended it later Wednesday during a budget speech in Lancaster, Pa., addressing a welcoming audience organized by the Lancaster Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Pennsylvania Dutch country. “Poor kids first,” Bush said. “Secondly, I believe in private medicine, not the federal government running the health-care system.” INSURANCE: Measure affecting thousands locally would cover more poor children. By Jennifer Loven THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON – President Bush, in a sharp confrontation with Congress, on Wednesday vetoed a bipartisan bill that would have dramatically expanded children’s health insurance. But he seemed eager to avert a full-scale showdown over the difficult issue, offering that he is “more than willing” to negotiate with lawmakers “if they need a little more money in the bill to help us meet the objective of getting help for poor children.” The program is a joint state-federal effort that subsidizes health coverage for 6.6 million people, mostly children, from families that earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to afford their own private coverage. The Democrats who control Congress, with significant support from Republicans, passed the legislation to add $35 billion over five years to allow an additional 4 million children into the program. It would be funded by raising the federal cigarette tax by 61 cents to $1 per pack. Locally, only families that take in less than 250 percent of the federal poverty level – about $43,000 a year for a family of four – qualify for the Healthy Families Program, the state program that administers the money. Because the cost of living is so much higher in California, state officials had hoped to expand the program to include families making about $62,000 a year, or 300 percent of the federal poverty level. About 235,000 children in Los Angeles County go without health insurance, according to county officials. When children don’t have access to basic health care, such as immunizations, preventative doctor’s visits and prescriptions, “it impacts everything,” said Caroline Rivas, policy director for Community Health Councils, a county advocacy group.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more