Chautauqua County’s Director Emergency Services Is Retiring Next Month

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File Image.MAYVILLE – Chautauqua County’s Director Emergency Services is retiring at the end of February.Chautauqua County Executive PJ Wendel announced on Friday that Director John Griffith will retire from his position effective March 1.Deputy Fire Coordinator Noel Guttman will take over following’s Griffith retirement.“It has been an honor to work with the first responders of Chautauqua County,” said Griffith in a statement. “I look forward to working with the new director to help him transition into the office.” Griffith first began his career with the county in April 2012 as a Deputy Fire Coordinator with the Office of Emergency Services.In October 2017, he was promoted to the position of Director.Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Griffith worked with the New York State Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Services to ensure resources were moved into Chautauqua County so first responders, law enforcement, health care workers, and others had proper and sufficient quantities of Personal Protective Equipment.“Throughout his eight years of service, John has worked tirelessly to serve and protect the residents and visitors of Chautauqua County,” said Wendel. “His leadership has been especially critical during the current COVID-19 Pandemic where he has worked closely with a magnitude of agencies to prevent and contain the virus.”“I thank John for his outstanding accomplishments in improving our county’s emergency preparedness and response, and his endless contributions in making Chautauqua County a safer place,” furthered Wendel. “I wish him all the best in retirement.”In addition to his job with the county, Guttman has been a member of the Mayville Fire Department since 1991.In his current role as Deputy Fire Coordinator, he led the County’s Technical Rescue Team and Chautauqua Area Search Team (CAST).Pictured, Chautauqua County Executive PJ Wendel (left) welcomes Noel Guttman as the County’s next Emergency Services Director. Submitted image.Guttman has also served in various law enforcement roles. He previously served as a part-time deputy sheriff with the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office, police officer with the Lakewood-Busti Police Department, and part-time police officer with the Westfield Police Department.Most recently, Guttman worked as a police officer with the Chautauqua Institution Police, where he was responsible for police patrol and event security within the grounds of the Chautauqua Institution.“I look forward to working in this position and continuing to serve Chautauqua County,” said Guttman.last_img read more

Professionalism Committee seeks award nominations

first_img Professionalism Committee seeks award nominations Professionalism Committee seeks award nominations September 15, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img The Florida Bar Standing Committee on Professionalism is seeking applications for two awards it hands out each year at the Bar’s Annual Meeting — the William H. Hoeveler Judicial Award and the Professionalism Award.The deadline for entries for both awards is December 10, 2002.The prestigious William H. Hoeveler Judicial Award, awarded in 2002 to former Justice Major B. Harding, is bestowed upon a judge “who best exemplifies strength of character, service, and competence as a jurist, lawyer, and public servant.”Nominees should also “have communicated their pledge to the ideals of justice and diligence in inspiring others to the mission of professionalism.”The 10th annual Florida Bar Professionalism Award is open to bar associations, judicial organizations, or law school projects aimed at enhancing professionalism among lawyers. The purpose of the award — given in 2002 to the Citrus-Hernando Inn of Court — is to promote the ideals and goals of professionalism, to reward programs that foster and promote professionalism, and create a collection point for programs around the state so those programs can be shared with others. A cash award of $1,000 will be presented to the winner at the Bar’s Annual Meeting.Applications and guidelines for both awards are available on the Bar’s Web site, www.FLABAR.org. For the Hoeveler award, click “Professionalism” in the blue menu bar. A link to the nomination form can be found at the bottom of the page. For the Professionalism Award, click “Committee Projects.” For more information, or to request copies of the applications, contact Paula Stephenson at the Center for Professionalism, 651 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300, telephone (850)561-5743, e-mail psteph@flabar.org.last_img read more

1776: Hit Musical About Birth of Our Nation Opens at Northport’s Engeman Theater

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Expect to be thoroughly entertained by an enthralling slice of American history set to music as 1776, the multiple Tony Award-winning musical about the events leading up to the signing of the Declaration of Independence, which recently opened at Northport’s John W. Engeman Theater.The show spans the summer months of its title year. It’s uncomfortably hot in the fly-plagued Philadelphian Hall that is home to the Second Congressional Congress, and business is moving at a snail’s pace. John Adams, the Massachusetts delegate, is deeply frustrated because Congress has not moved forward on his proposal that the American colonies break free from British rule. In fact, a year has trickled through the hourglass, and Adams has earned the reputation of being obnoxious and disliked because of his persistence.This was a rebellious act that no other British possession had ever dared contemplate. Yet life in the colonies had given rise to a new breed, less refined than the British perhaps, yet tantalizingly bold. Delegates teetered on the decision to brave “the sea in a skiff made of paper” for three sweltering months.Eventually, when delegates do commit to a “yea” or “nay,” a deadlock emerges, with the South pitted against the North. To make matters more difficult, John Hancock, Congressional President, rules that the decision for or against independence must be unanimous, so “no colony be torn from its mother country without its own consent.”Adams calls for a postponement and suggests that a document clarifying the reasons behind the break from Great Britain be drafted. Hence the Declaration of Independence would be written.Jamie LaVerdiere, who boasts Broadway, national and international tour credits, previously appeared in Engeman’s The Cottage and Sweet Charity. He excels as Adams, the principled idealist and passionately annoying squeaky wheel who refuses to be silenced. Adams and his wife, Abigail, had a deep bond nurtured by written correspondence. Their responses to each other’s missives are depicted in the show. Jennifer Hope Wills, who has appeared on Broadway and regionally, does full justice to the role of Abigail. Their voices blend in sweet harmony in the songs, “Until Then,” and “Yours, Yours, Yours.”Adams’ primary supporters in the fight for independence are Thomas Jefferson and Ben Franklin. In his Engeman debut, Michael Glavan is superb as the taciturn Jefferson, who possessed the written eloquence needed to compose the Declaration of Independence.David Studwell endows Franklin with both wisdom and a keen comic flair, the latter of which is showcased in the clever repartee that takes place when Franklin and Adams run into Martha Jefferson. She has been sent for by Adams because Jefferson has been pining for his wife. When asked by Franklin how the inordinately quiet Jefferson managed to snare such a comely bride, Martha (Adriana Milbrath) responds with “He Plays the Violin,” a saucy song full of innuendos and double entendres. It makes for delightful levity.At the end of Act I, a bedraggled courier (Matthew Rafanelli), who silently trudges into Congressional Hall bearing messages from George Washington, surprises the audience with a song, “Momma Look Sharp.” It is a poignant and heartbreaking reminder of the true cost of war and Rafanelli renders it to perfection.South Carolina’s Edward Rutledge (Peter Saide) similarly delivers a wake-up call about the North’s hypocrisy with respect to slavery. “Molasses to Rum” is a stunningly dramatic number about the harsh realities of triangular trade.The action really heats up in Act II and its songs like these two that kept me glued to my seat.Expect to experience an engrossing behind-the-scenes look into the personalities who catapulted America into revolution. You might be reminded, as I was, of another spellbinding Engeman hit, 12 Angry Men, where there is similar deliberation. However, in 1776, the destiny of not just one man, but of an entire nation hangs in the balance. We identify with the characters’ moral and philosophical quandaries because the Founding Fathers are depicted, not as demigods, but as flawed and all too human.The show is a deeply thought-provoking one. Given the present political climate, I felt wistful about the spirit of moral integrity that permeated Congressional Hall. Despite fundamental differences, in the final analysis, the delegates listened to others and were open to compromise, which was, at times, hard wrought.Director Igor Goldin has been at the helm of many of Engeman’s finest productions, including  Memphis, West Side Story, South Pacific, and, of course, 12 Angry Men. His astute direction and attention to detail is outstanding, making for ensemble work at its best. He once again delivers a theatrical masterpiece.One of the first things that I noticed was the authentic period costumes, in keeping with the persona of each character. Major kudos to Kurt Alger for his costume and wig design, which delight the eyes. Compliments also to the five piece band led by Music Director Eric Alsford.I would be remiss if I did not call attention to the playbill, which is something of a keepsake. It contains an image of the original Declaration with its signatures. There is a picture of each delegate, the actor that plays him, and fascinating details about the men who shaped history.1776 runs through Nov. 6. Tickets can be purchased at the box office, by calling 631-261-2900 or visiting www.engemantheater.comlast_img read more