Ex-49ers coach Jim Harbaugh at it again, equates vanquished rival with ‘storm troopers’

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceIf there is a more homely, avert-your-gaze, hide-the-children rivalry trophy in college sports than the Paul Bunyan trophy, I’ve yet to see it.The unsettling expression. The fright-wig beard. Hands on hips and leaning back as if about to…Let’s just say the prize was fitting given the competitive exercise: Michigan vs. Michigan State. They were still talking about Saturday’s inelegant game on Monday. (And not just …last_img read more

Psychotherapy: Needs Reboot? or Just Boot?

first_imgThe word “reboot” assumes a prior boot.  You can’t reboot something that never booted up in the first place.  The American Psychological Association is calling for “rebooting psychotherapy.”  Is it even booted up?  The press release begins with an admission that questions whether psychotherapy ever got powered on. The damaging quote from the American Psychological Association is right in the first paragraph: Psychotherapy has come a long way since the days of Freudian psychoanalysis – today, rigorous scientific studies are providing evidence for the kinds of psychotherapies that effectively treat various psychiatric disorders. But Alan Kazdin, the John M. Musser Professor of Psychology at Yale University, believes that we must acknowledge a basic truth – all of our progress and development in evidence-based psychotherapy has failed to solve the rather serious problem of mental illness in the United States. If a reboot would simply get the solution software running again, all would be well.  But this statement calls it a “basic truth,” one that must be acknowledged, that “all of our progress” has failed to solve mental illness.  Was that not ostensibly its goal, its mission? To be sure, the remainder of the press release focuses on problems with getting the goods to the patients that need help, but nine months after Kazdin dropped his bombshell, he is challenging his colleagues “to rethink the current mental health system in order to make adequate treatment available and accessible to all who need it.”  This is followed by three bullet points on improving the delivery of psychotherapy.  But nowhere is there affirmation that the treatments actually cure anyone, even if “rigorous scientific studies are providing evidence for the kinds of psychotherapies that effectively treat various psychiatric disorders.”  It would seem that if the rigorous studies are such a good mousetrap, the world would beat a path to psychotherapy’s door.  Indeed, just before the bullet points, another damaging admission was made: “Now, in the latest issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science, several eminent scientists have come forth in response to Kazdin and Blase’s article, highlighting important points that will need to be addressed before the mental health care system can be overhauled….” The last sentence is a distraction: “United States Department of Veterans Affairs has already developed and implemented new and innovative programs to address the mental health of its veterans.”  Innovative is nice, and addressing a problem is praiseworthy, but no evidence was provided the VA has any better a track record at solving mental illness. This makes psychotherapy sound like a government project gone wrong, a bridge to nowhere, a design plan that never produced a working prototype.  If serious points must be addressed before the mental health care system can be overhauled, the software isn’t up and running, and there is no way to reboot it. See also “Psychotherapy Struggles to Demonstrate Scientific Validity” from 11/13/2005 and three prior articles about psychotherapists struggling to define what mental illness is (2/17/2010, 2/28/2010, 4/21/2011).  Did the brain evolve?  See 11/09/2007 and 10/22/2010. Did you notice the oblique slam at Freud?  He was the king of the hill in his day; now he is a joke (4/27/2011).  Psychotherapy has undergone so many revolutions in its brief history it is unrecognizable.  Now they tell us that in 2011 it has still ”failed to solve the rather serious problem of mental illness in the United States.” But they want to improve the delivery of this failure!  The chaotic history of psychotherapy, from couch talk to mythical unconscious divination to electric shock to drugs to non-directive counseling to whatever is the fad today, is enough to warn the wary to keep away from the charlatan industry with its self-admitted failure to achieve its own goals. The human mind is too complex an entity to submit to the pseudoscience of psychology, and the mixed bag of psychotherapy.  A psychotherapist can never get into a patient’s mind, or understand all the complexities of causes and effects that produce outward symptoms.  The best that can be done is external observation: such-and-such a drug makes Joe less violent, an electric shock makes him forget his paranoid delusion, a horror movie makes Joe (but not Sam) sleepless, calm music relieves manic depression.  Some things might work in some patients as far as improving outward symptoms, but they can never prove that the psychotherapist has addressed the root cause. A lot of treatment reduces to common sense (2/21/2010), without the need for a shrink to tell you the obvious. What if sin is real? What if sin produces real guilt, not just feelings of guilt?  Giving the patient a drug or calm music will only put a band-aid on the surface.  By ignoring the spiritual and moral dimensions of human beings, secular psychotherapists are limiting themselves to partial toolkits at best.  What if the necessary therapy for the “mentally ill” patient is forgiveness of sin that gets at the root cause?  Pastors have numerous true accounts of transformed lives, criminals turned into saints, addicts into missionaries, wolves into lambs, when they faced their true guilt and kneeled at the foot of the cross of Jesus Christ.  Talk about empirical evidence! What if “mental illness” is an oxymoron?  There is physical illness, and everyone acknowledges that brain damage can lead to bizarre behavior.  These can be treated as physical illnesses, not “mental illness.”  In many Christian churches, there is a whole movement called Biblical counseling that, in contrast to psychotherapy, treats the root cause of behavioral problems (the ones lacking a physical cause) as sin.  Their patients often reach a profound sense of relief when they get straight talk about their sin problems, instead of the runaround about “mental illness” the shrinks offer with their pseudoscientific band-aid solutions. Psychotherapist, heal thyself.  Show the goods, or you don’t get a reboot.  You just get the boot.(Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Entire Nagaland declared ‘disturbed’ for six more months under AFSPA

first_imgCentre has declared the entire State of Nagaland a “disturbed area” for six more months under the controversial AFSPA, which empowers security forces to conduct operations anywhere and arrest anyone without prior notice.In a notification, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) said the Central government is of the opinion that the area comprising the whole State of Nagaland is in such a “disturbed and dangerous condition” that the use of armed forces in aid of the civil power is necessary.“Now, therefore, in exercise of the powers conferred by Section 3 of the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act, 1958 (No. 28 of 1958), the Central government hereby declares that whole of the said State to be a ‘disturbed area’ for a period of six months with effect from June 30, 2019 for the purpose of that Act,” the notification said.The Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act has been in force in Nagaland for several decades. It was not withdrawn even after a framework agreement was signed on August 3, 2015 by Naga insurgent group NSCN-IM general secretary Thuingaleng Muivah and government interlocutor R.N. Ravi in the presence of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.The framework agreement came after more than 80 rounds of negotiations over 18 years. The first breakthrough came in 1997 when the ceasefire agreement was sealed after decades of insurgency.last_img read more

Not consulted on demolition around Jagannath temple: Puri Shankaracharya

first_imgShankaracharya of Puri Swami Nischalananda Saraswati on Saturday said the Odisha government took a unilateral decision to demolish structures within 75-metre radius of Shree Jagannath Temple and he was not consulted on this important matter.Terming the ongoing demolition a conspiracy, the seer said the committee headed by former Orissa High Court Judge B.P. Das neither met him nor consulted him. The committee had suggested clearing the area around the 12th century temple of encroachments for its security.The Jagannath temple affairs should be regulated by religious processes and mutts’ activities follow similar process, he said.The seer’s reaction came in the wake of ongoing demolition of the 12th century Emar Mutt, close to the temple. Even as the eviction drive is under way, mutt Mahant Rajgopal Ramanuj Dash has been protesting the move and refused to vacate the structure.last_img read more