UBM Revenue Up 26 Percent In First Half

first_img But as Advanstar and UBM’s events portfolio marched ahead, PR Newswire’s performance was flat and its Other Marketing Services businesses declined 8-percent. The losses there were mainly due to a cut in online revenue, “reflect[ing] a decision to focus on Tech products with higher quality leads.” Amid a series of major changes, UBM’s revenue shot up 26 percent in the first half of 2015. The gains were largely driven by the integration of Advanstar and the progression of its “events first” strategy, the company says. All of that change came as several executive leadership positions were vacated, then filled with new personnel. UBM has appointed a new CFO, and new CEOs of PR Newswire and its Americas division in recent months. In fact, as a whole, UBM’s 120-plus major events performed similarly well. Driving almost two-thirds of the company’s revenue, events grew 3.3 percent, with much of that growth attributable to the events first strategy put into place in late 2014. As part of that shift, the company has focused on its larger shows, selling or closing almost 40 events and several related lines of business in order to consolidate resources. UBM also bought three events during the period, and is in the process of rolling out a number of operational changes.center_img While underlying revenue actually declined 4.1 percent to about $710 million, the October acquisition of U.S. event producer and publisher, Advanstar, accounted for a significant portion of UBM’s additional $148 million through June. The division boosted its events revenue—totaling almost three-quarters of its total income—by 2.9 percent in the first half. Integration efforts with its new parent company are ahead of schedule, as well, UBM reports. A favorable foreign exchange environment also added to top line growth in the first half, the company notes.last_img read more

Germanys Islamist scene growing

first_imgGermany’s domestic security chief warned Sunday that the country’s radical Islamist scene is not only growing, but becoming more decentralised, posing greater challenges to surveillance operations.In an interview with national news agency DPA, Hans-Georg Maassen also defended security officials under fire after it emerged that Berlin truck attack suspect Anis Amri had slipped through their net, saying they had done everything they could.Overall, the number of Salafists—or fundamentalist Sunni Muslims—in Germany has risen to more than 9,700, sharply up from 3,800 people in 2011, said Maassen.“It’s of great concern to us that this scene is not only growing, but it is also very diversified. There is not just one, two, three or four people who have a say,” he warned.“Rather, there are many people who dominate this Salafist scene. And all these people have to be watched.”While in the past, there were a few people who wielded influence, today, there are many small clusters formed by individuals.“So you can no longer talk about a Salafist scene as a whole, but you have to deal with many hotspots. That makes things more difficult for us, because we can no longer just watch a few people. We have to monitor many groups,” he said.In a defence of security officials under pressure for failing to stop Amri, Maassen said that although officers had watched the Tunisian over a long period of time, they found no evidence to arrest him.“I believe that the security forces, in particular the police, have done everything in their power to assess the danger posed by Amri. But it is also clear that we live under the rule of law, and the legal framework must be respected,” he said.Amri, 24, who was shot dead by Italian police days after ramming a truck into a crowded Christmas market, had been under surveillance since March. But German police dropped their watch in September thinking he was a small-time drug dealer.Public anger also mounted as the rejected asylum seeker and known radical Islamist should have been deported long ago.In the wake of the attack, Chancellor Angela Merkel admitted that “the Amri case raises questions” and ordered a sweeping review of Germany’s security apparatus.last_img read more