Let me announce my retirement when the moment comes: Iker Casillas

first_img Next Let me announce my retirement when the moment comes: Iker CasillasIker Casillas had suffered a heart attack during a training session with his current team, FC Porto, casting major doubt about his ability to continue in the sport.advertisement Indo-Asian News Service MadridJune 13, 2019UPDATED: June 13, 2019 21:24 IST Iker Casillas says that he is yet undecided about his future in professional football (Reuters Photo)Former Spain goalkeeper Iker Casillas on Thursday said he had not yet decided whether he would retire from the sport after suffering a heart attack amid rumours in several Portuguese newspapers that he would hang up his gloves before the start of the next season.Casillas, on his Twitter account, reshared a previous tweet in which he said he was yet undecided about his future in the sport, reported Efe news.In the original tweet, published just over two weeks after his heart attack on May 1, the former Real Madrid goalie said: “Retirement, there will be a day that I’ll have to retire. Let me announce this when the moment comes. For now … everyone relax! I had an appointment yesterday with Dr. Filipe Macedo. Everything is ok. This is great news that I would like to share with all of you!”In his retweet, he said: “The same from this tweet from one month ago, except the part of the meeting with the Doctor. More than anything because my appointment is tomorrow. Big hug to everyone.”The former Real Madrid captain suffered a heart attack during a training session with his current team, FC Porto, casting major doubt about his ability to continue in the sport.Casillas’ personal situation got even more complicated when his wife, journalist Sara Carbonero, announced that she went through a malignant ovarian tumour surgery on May 21.On June 6, various Portuguese newspapers said that Casillas met Pinto da Costa, President of FC Porto, where he was offered the possibility to continue working in the club, but as part of the technical staff.advertisementCasillas made his professional debut with Real Madrid under then coach, Welshman John Benjamin Toshack, against Athletic Bilbao in September 1999 in San Mames at the age of 19.At Real Madrid, Casillas was in the team that won the UEFA Champions League three times, LaLiga five times, the Copa del Rey twice, the Spanish Super Cup four times and the FIFA Club World Cup twice.For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byrohan sen Tags :Follow Iker CasillasFollow Sara Carbonerolast_img read more

About half of Canadians expect to be in debt when they retire

TORONTO — Canadians may dream of retiring debt-free, but research done for Manulife suggests nearly 20% of homeowners may be leaning on the value of their homes to finance life after work.[np_storybar title=”‘Tis the season of spending: How to stay within your budget over the holidays” link=”https://business.financialpost.com/2014/11/29/tis-the-season-of-spending-how-to-stay-within-your-budget-over-the-holidays/”%5DCanadians say they expect to spend an average of $1,056.50 on gifts and other holiday-related purchases this time of year, but 67% don’t have a budget for such expenses, according to a new poll [/np_storybar]An online survey conducted for the financial services company found about half of the 2,373 respondents expected to still be in debt when they retire.Of those polled, 10% planned to borrow against their current homes, while about 8% were looking to downsize and use money from the sale of their home as income. Using home equity as a “fallback plan” suggests some Canadians are struggling to balance retirement with paying down debt, Manulife Bank CEO Rick Lunny said in an interview.“If people think they’re going to take out second mortgages and larger mortgages when they retire, that’s a pretty concerning view and evidence of no financial plan whatsoever,” Lunny said.“These people, if they’re going to retire with mortgage debt on their homes, there’s significant risk that interest rates will go up in the future.”The Manulife survey also found that many still struggle with financial literacy. For example, one-quarter of respondents didn’t consider mortgages or auto loans to be part of their overall debt.Older respondents were less confident in their retirement goals and about half planned to continue working full-time or part-time to extinguish their debt, the survey said.Manulife’s findings come after years of warnings from the Bank of Canada and the federal Finance Department that many people are still amassing too much debt.Throw in concerns that Canada’s housing market may be overpriced, and the likelihood that interest rates will rise in the coming years, and several additional levels of risk could be introduced into the financial equation.“Canadians have been lulled into this sense of security because they’re paying 3% or less on their mortgages, but that could change very quickly,” Lunny said. “People don’t have long memories and if their only reference period is the last five years or so, since the financial crisis, they better be prepared for it.”Debt problems are nothing new for most Canadians and neither are the surveys which conclude that most people aren’t properly saving for the future.TD Insurance released findings last month which said 39% of Canadians would run into financial problems if they were forced to stop working due to a sudden illness. The figure rose to 44% for respondents under the age of 35.Taking advantage of housing wealth in retirement isn’t necessarily a bad decision, suggested Thomas Davidoff, an assistant professor at the Sauder School of Business in Vancouver.“What I think, arguably, would be crazy is to live a meagre retirement and not have tapped an enormous asset,” he said.“It really depends on how important it is for you to leave wealth to your heirs, and how nervous you are about surprise expenditures.”He said that borrowing on a home is better choice than turning to high interest rate credit cards.“I don’t care what rates do, it’s never more expensive to owe on a home equity line or reverse mortgage,” he said.The online survey, conducted by data collection agency Research House, polled Canadian homeowners between the ages of 20 and 59, with a household income of $50,000 or more, from Sept. 8 to Sept. 19.The polling industry’s professional body, the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association, says online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error as they are not a random sample and therefore are not necessarily representative of the whole population.“ read more