Episcopal clergy arrested after entering Trinity Church property

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. December 19, 2011 at 3:15 pm I’m sorry, but where in the Bible does it say Jesus led mobs in ransacking the homes of the Pharisees or in stealing the offerings from the Temple? The Jews of His time were looking for a Messiah just like the one you’re describing and they were so disappointed that Jesus wasn’t the one leading them to “climb those fences” that they crucified Him. Of course, this doesn’t really matter for Episcopalians any more as the Bible is merely an historical document about which they’re occasionally embarrassed when it doesn’t happen to agree with their ideas of “social justice.” Suzanne Smith says: John D. Andrews says: Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Brian Smith says: December 18, 2011 at 4:41 pm Convincing someone of what is in front of them? Dust your sandals off and move on. Haven’t you been listening to who owns the ballot boxes? Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs December 18, 2011 at 4:02 pm This is a remarkably accurate statement of an extraordinarily fluid situation. Thank you for writing with such objectivity and so much nuance. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Jess Parmer says: Stan Chaz says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ January 3, 2012 at 7:50 pm I thought that the Bishop was wearing a purple cassock, rather than a purple robe? December 19, 2011 at 1:28 am You don’t need to be religious to understand -and embrace- the idea that “Whatsoever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.” But the 1%, in their blind greed and schemes, have forgotten and closed their eyes to what the word “society” should really mean. Because of Occupy Wall Street, we are finally talking less about CUTS and more about BLEEDING. Instead of demanding m-o-r-e budget cuts -to be borne by the middle class and poor- we are FINALLY focusing on the shameful bleeding that the poor and middle class has endured for all too long. Instead of talking about even m-o-r-e cuts in the taxes of millionaires….we are now talking about fairness and justice – about an economy and a political system that is increasingly run for the rich, and by the rich. Instead of talking about LESS government, we are talking about a government that WORKS FOR ALL OF US, not just a favored few. Thank you OWS, for reminding us that people -ordinary working people- really DO matter, and for helping open our eyes to what’s really going on in this country. Trinity Church should look deep into its collective soul, and at its ultimate mission. It should do the right thing, and help OWS. For I would bet my life, that if He were physically with us today…as He was 2000 years ago, He himself would be among the FIRST to climb those fences, and occupy Trinity’s Duarte Square. Of this I am certain. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Jess Parmer says: December 18, 2011 at 2:29 pm The most “amazing” thing in this article is that Ms. Packard has been reduced to a mouthpiece for an organization who’s interpretation of justice is not representative of the Spirit. The spirit blowing forcefully into Ms. Packard’s life is one of poor judgement and political evil. If Ms. Packard and others like her want a political movement, which is what this is, then take it to the polls, as Bishop Tutu suggests, and let the people decide what to do with it. I am not at all convinced that this movement is anything other than a quest for power and confiscation. So OWS wins, what then? Who decides what is just, this group? Show us, please Ms. Packard, a single place in the world where such movements have not lead to murder, oppression and an eventual accumulation of wealth by the people who control the movement. Then, please convince me that this movement is different. December 19, 2011 at 12:51 pm Tsk, tsk,tsk…name calling and demonizing Wild Wiley. Now go and wash your mouth out with soap. Per your sainted mother. December 19, 2011 at 9:22 pm I am grateful to Bishop Packard, Rev. Merz, and Rev. Sniffen for saving our Church from shame this weekend. There are many compelling reasons for our Church to join with OWS. I offer my opinion in depth, here: http://www.episcopalcafe.com/daily/parishes/occupy_wall_street_and_the_epi.php Rector Knoxville, TN December 20, 2011 at 12:38 pm This is a remarkable time, with very challenging situations. It is important for me to be still and see if this is of God, then it will transform our lives, if not it will be a flash in the pan of news notes.If the injustices of financial and political activity is exposed and confronted than “thanks be to God’. If individual egos are simply being fed, then they will discover the struggles of such a path.This is a time to be prayerful, to be open to the working of the Holy Spirit and to listen to all the various voices, perhaps we will be converted again to a deeper faith and love. J. H. Shumaker says: December 18, 2011 at 7:06 pm Bravo to the Packards, the Bishop and the Bishopress (as our Global South friends would say down Desmond Tutu way)…it´s true, the spirit is blowing and it won´t blow the integrity of fellow human beings down–as for the oppressors, you´re on your own (which is probably your favorite position anyway) the battle has been won but not the war chest that you adore. Peter Jenks says: December 20, 2011 at 1:28 pm Seizing privately owned property is a Marxist ideal. Seizing privately owned church property is even better. What really takes the cake here is the idea that the protestors are entitled to somebody else’s property by virtue of their moral superiority over the lawful owners. Vladimir Lenin would be so proud! Suzanne Smith says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Occupy Movement Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Dr. Gene Bourquin says: December 19, 2011 at 3:39 pm What an embarrassment for Trinity Wall Street (which is ridiculously rich anyway) and shame on our Presiding Bishop – to be on the side of corporate greed and “art” and respectability – at the expense of the marginalized and those whose lives have been upended during this financial crisis. Thank God for the Packards! They are true voices of faith and love in our church. Maybe it is time for mainstream churches like ECUSA to fade away. We’ve become too respectable and lost touch with the Gospels and Jesus’ radical message of love and charity. Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Wiley Kendrick says: center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA December 18, 2011 at 4:48 pm I hope Ms. Packard will forgive me for speaking up for her in reply to Kendrick, who misuses rhetorical flourish in several attempts here to deprive any who answer of a voice either rational or historical. The one example is: the American Revolution. True enough, it led to slavery’s institutionalization for roughly ninety years after the Constitution was adopted, but that ended in abolition, didn’t it? Ms. Packard feels the Spirit blowing over the shoulders of riot-geared, jack-booted, and faceless “liberators” of a trivial piece of property, as they sling her body around. Does Kendrick suggest she misread this wind? Look at Kendrick’s name calling: she is a “mouthpiece;” she is associated with “poor judgement and political evil” without the slightest effort of proof. Such rhetorical dust has already settled for me: It is Kendrick who must answer for the baseless falsehoods implied in this diatribe. Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS January 9, 2012 at 8:19 pm From the first the Church’s response to the Good News of Christ was communal-in your terms, Marxist. Check out Acts 4:32 to 5:11. Lenin was not opposed to the values and ethics found in the Gospels, he was opposed to the oppression of human beings. There are two additions in the new Church Calander that you might want to check out. They are celebrated on October 8th-William Dwight Porter Bliss and Richard Theodore Ely. They believed that the Church was to call for economic justice and that the Gospels supported that goal. The wrote and preached against economic oppression in the United States 100 years ago. Perhaps Trinity Episcopal Church should have a Bible Study centered around the call for economic justice in the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures and read the essays and sermons of these men before they side with those who oppress others for personal gain. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Rev. P Joshua Griffin says: January 7, 2012 at 8:32 pm How off-topic can you get? Who climbed the fence first?–an Episcopal bishop. What mobs were there ransacking homes or stealing?–none. You seem to assume the Zealots and other radicals crucified Jesus–a proposition that you must prove, though I doubt you’ll find much evidence. The Bible IS an historical document, and we are all better off for seeing it that way, so that our social justice can be grafted onto it. Remember, it was only about 1.5 centuries ago that the Bible used in your sense was also used to justify slavery. Time to take off the biblical inerrancy blinders and use the perfectly good brain God gave you. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET December 18, 2011 at 9:27 pm To speak against the Packards is to speak against history. We celebrate Desmond Tutu for his civil disobedience. We celebrate Martin Luther King for his civil disobedience. We celebrate those who took part in the Arab Spring. But, when it happens in our own church some speak against it. To me that is being a hypocrite. Too many Episcopal churches have become settled churches, perhaps TEC has too. They have become comfortable and do not want to be bothered with discerning God’s Spirit, acting in concert with what the Spirit is doing in the world. Too many see piety as the goal instead of working with the Holy Spirit to bring justice to the world. Trinity Wall Street and TEC had an opportunity to work for justice in this very public arena; they chose not to. People, especially young people, are looking for churches that practice authentic Christianity. Rightly or wrongly they will most likely form the opinion that Episcopalians do not practice authentic Christianity, but are hypocrites. December 18, 2011 at 4:38 pm Blessings to Ms. Packard. Social justice is our work. Respectfully, I do not think there is a ‘win’ or lose for OWS. It’s the message more than the messenger; there is no doubt of the growing inequities in our country. Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Donna Schaper says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anne Beal says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Charles W. Daily, Jr. says: Episcopal clergy arrested after entering Trinity Church property TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (18) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Elaine Jenkins says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tom Haven says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Sharon SheridanPosted Dec 18, 2011 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY December 19, 2011 at 3:49 pm Beautifully articulated. Retired Episcopal bishop George E. Packard (purple robe) and other protesters affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement are detained after climbing a ladder to trespass on a privately-owned piece of land near Juan Pablo Duarte Square during a march in New York December 17, 2011. Hundreds of anti-Wall Street protesters took to the New York streets on Saturday in an attempt to establish a new encampment, with a number arrested as they tried to move onto land owned by Trinity Church, Wall Street. Photo/REUTERS/Andrew Burton[Episcopal News Service] Retired Episcopal Bishop George Packard and at least two other Episcopal priests were arrested Dec. 17 after they entered a fenced property — owned by Trinity Episcopal Church, Wall Street — in Duarte Square in Lower Manhattan as part of Occupy Wall Street‘s “D17 Take Back the Commons” event to celebrate three months since the movement’s launch.Bishop George Packard climbs over a fence surrounding the Duarte Square property in lower Manhattan owned by Trinity Wall Street in a Dec. 17 effort to open the area to Occupy Wall Street protesters. Photo/REUTERS/Andrew BurtonLivestream video showed the former Episcopal bishop for the armed forces and federal ministries, dressed in a purple robe and wearing a cross, climbing a ladder that protesters erected against the fence at about 3:30 p.m. and dropping to the ground inside the property. Packard was the first to enter the site. Other protesters followed, including the Rev. John Merz and the Rev. Michael Sniffen, Episcopal priests in the Diocese of Long Island.Soon after, police entered the area and arrested at least 50 people. Merz reportedly was arrested with Packard. Sniffen was conducting a telephone interview with ENS that ended abruptly. At 11 p.m., he confirmed that he subsequently had been arrested. Just before midnight, Packard’s wife, Brook, told ENS via e-mail that her husband had been released and was on his way home.OWS had been lobbying Trinity to use the property for a winter encampment, following the movement’s Nov. 15 eviction from Zuccotti Park near the church. Trinity had refused, citing a lack of facilities at the site and its lease agreement allowing the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council to use it for periodic art installations. Packard had been trying to mediate an agreement between OWS members and Trinity.“Trinity Wall Street would not meet with Occupy Wall Street. They refused,” said Brook Packard in a telephone interview shortly after 7 p.m. Dec. 17. “When Trinity closed its ears and refused to negotiate, the path of civil disobedience was clear.”On Dec. 17, OWS had invited protesters to attend a “Block Party and Re-Occupation” at Sixth Avenue and Canal Street, site of the Trinity-owned property near the Holland Tunnel, beginning at noon. The event was scheduled to include on-site entertainment plus performances broadcast by WBAI radio: “From the airwaves to the subterranean let us assemble once again to say we’re here to liberate space and we’re not going away.”Sniffen told ENS he entered the park with Packard and other Episcopal and interfaith clergy. Over the phone, the sounds of people singing “Lo, how a rose e’er blooming” could be heard in the background.Sniffen said he was concerned about getting arrested and didn’t know until the last moment whether he would enter the fenced area.“As a matter of conscience and discernment, I felt that I had to enter … in solidarity with these people who I’ve been supporting from the beginning and who are taking an enormous risk to force a conversation to happen about social and economic justice,” he said. “As a priest of all the people, I felt that it was important to be with the people rather than looking at them through the fence as they take this great risk.”A moment later, he reported, “There are a lot of people exiting the park” and then, “I’ve got to go.”Livestream video of one portion of the fence showed protesters pushing it inward and police officers pushing it outward. Cameraman Tim Pool reported that police pushed their clubs through the fence to move protesters away.“The people outside the fence who were not breaking the law were in much more danger than the people inside. I thought I was going to lose my life,” said Brook Packard, who also described her experience on her husband’s blog. “We were sitting outside the fence. The cops came, and they started pushing the fence down on us and pushing the people that were standing.”“A cop looked me in the eye and kneed me in the chest,” she said. She asked him to stop and “he kneed me two more times. I was pushed to the ground, and then I was picked up and thrown on top of other people.”“I was not alone,” she added. “That’s nothing compared to what the protesters have encountered in terms of violence as they try and get this movement moving.”Inspired by the Arab Spring demonstrations that sparked political change in the Middle East, the Occupy movement protesting greed and economic inequality has spread to more than 2,500 locations across the country and the world. Officials in many cities have dismantled encampments, including New York’s original site at Zuccotti Park. At an Advent event in New York on Dec. 3, at which Packard delivered the invocation, an OWS member named Laura read a “proposed national call to reoccupy” on Dec. 17.“We call on displaced occupations across the nation to reoccupy outdoor places,” she said.Said Brook Packard, “There are two things that can kill this movement: violence and not having a home. And they need a home.”Members of an OWS working group she attended discussed how, in seeking to use Trinity’s property, “they didn’t want to make it against religion or people of faith” and wanted to make it clear that “the end goal was not to occupy this area,” she said. “The end result was to get a home, so that from there they could occupy foreclosed homes for homeless people instead of banks” and take other actions.Faith leaders have differed on whether Trinity – which has allowed use of other facilities for OWS meeting space and respite – should permit an encampment on the Duarte Square site and whether protesters should “occupy” the space without permission.The Rev. Michael Ellick of Judson Memorial Church, one of the leaders in an interfaith group supporting OWS, wrote in an e-mailed notice to supporters Dec. 16: “Occupy Faith NYC has always supported the OWS ask of Trinity, and will continue to do so, but there is no clear consensus on actions like civil disobedience. Without this consensus, we will not be endorsing such actions, and individual faith leaders who may choose to go this route will be doing so autonomously. That said, I encourage all of you to join us tomorrow for this event.”Also on Dec. 16, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Episcopal Diocese of New York Bishop Mark Sisk each issued statements criticizing OWS attempts to occupy the Trinity property without permission.“The Trinity congregation has decided that the property known as Duarte Park is not appropriate for use by the Occupy movement, and that property remains closed,” Jefferts Schori wrote. “Other facilities of Trinity continue to be open to support the Occupy movement, for which I give great thanks. It is regrettable that Occupy members feel it necessary to provoke potential legal and police action by attempting to trespass on other parish property.”Retired South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu issued two statements. The first praised OWS members as “a voice for the world.”“Trinity Church is an esteemed and valued old friend of mine … That is why it is especially painful for me to hear of the impasse you are experiencing with the parish. I appeal to them to find a way to help you,” he said.The second statement discouraged attempts to occupy the property. “My statement is not to be used to justify breaking the law,” Tutu said. “In a country where all people can vote and Trinity’s door to dialogue is open, it is not necessary to forcibly break into property. Nor is it to reinforce or build higher the barriers between people of faith who seek peace and justice. My deep prayer is that people can work together and I look forward to that conversation.”Brook Packard, however, said Trinity, despite repeated OWS requests, had not been willing to dialogue directly with OWS members beyond a recent meeting with hunger strikers seeking to get Trinity to permit OWS use of the property.“The real story is, why did Trinity not engage in dialogue?” she asked. “Trinity more than anyone should know its own history, particularly with its support of Desmond Tutu, that laws must be broken in order for justice to reign.”In a Dec. 17 statement, Trinity’s rector, the Rev. James Cooper, said the church was “saddened that OWS protestors chose to ignore yesterday’s messages” from Jefferts Schori, Tutu and Sisk.“OWS protestors call out for social and economic justice; Trinity has been supporting these goals for more than 300 years,” he wrote. “The protestors say they want to improve housing and economic development; Trinity is actively engaged in such efforts in the poorest neighborhoods in New York City and indeed around the world. We do not, however, believe that erecting a tent city at Duarte Square enhances their mission or ours. The vacant lot has no facilities to sustain a winter encampment. In good conscience and faith, we strongly believe to do so would be wrong, unsafe, unhealthy and potentially injurious. We will continue to provide places of refuge and the responsible use of our facilities in the Wall Street area.”After the arrests at Duarte Square, OWS participants began another march. Videographer Pool reported they were headed toward Cooper’s home, but police blocked the street. Marchers then took to the streets, snarling evening traffic on Seventh Avenue and, after temporarily being blocked by police, walking to Times Square.Before attending the Dec. 17 event, Brook Packard said, “We had agreed that [George] would be arrested and I would be home.”“After that really terrifying moment of having the fence crush me and having the police throwing me around,” she said, she was able to walk to another location and sang a song to let her husband know she was there. He later called her from the police “paddy wagon.”Reflecting on the OWS participants, she said, “We love these people. They are remarkable. They have been misrepresented in the media. They are young and vital and brilliant. There are some hangers-on, but that happens.”“This is the wind of the Spirit blowing forcefully into our lives,” she said. “This could have been an amazing opportunity for Trinity and an amazing moment for the entire church, but they chose private property over people and principles.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Leonardo Ricardo says: Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more

Churches worldwide observe week of prayer for unity

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. [Ecumenical News International] Churches around the world observed a week of prayer from Jan. 18-25, holding special worship services and gatherings that emphasized what Christians hold in common.This year’s Week of Prayer for Christian Unity centered on the scriptural theme, “We will all be changed by the victory of our Lord Jesus Christ,” from the book of Corinthians (15:51-58). Celebrated in some areas at Pentecost, the week is sponsored by the Catholic church’s Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and the Geneva-based World Council of Churches (WCC).Materials for celebration and reflection this year were prepared by churches in Poland, sharing their history of partition and victory over oppression, the WCC said in a news release.In the Philippines, where people have been faced with governance crisis, churches took the lead towards national unity in setting aside their doctrinal differences. Together they marked the week by praying for change and peace.Churches Together in Britain and Ireland stressed the significance of change as an integral part of theology and unity among the churches. “Change is also at the heart of the ecumenical movement. When we pray for the unity of the church we are praying that the churches that we know, and which are so familiar to us, will change as they conform more closely to Christ,” they said.Celebrations also took place in France and Switzerland, and throughout Europe, where various churches, including Orthodox, Roman Catholics and Protestants, reflected together on the theme of Christian unity in prayer and meditations, the WCC said.Across the U.S. and Canada, local Christian communities marked the week with special worship services and community gatherings.According to the Rev. Victor Kim from Grace Presbyterian Church in Calgary, Alberta, “it’s a week that is ecumenical in nature. So it’s not about one particular denomination, one particular strand.”However, in Lahore, Pakistan, a gathering on Jan. 23 of Catholic and Protestant leaders that marked the week of prayer said that unity is being threatened by unconsecrated, “unofficial” churches, according to CathNews India, a Catholic news service.“Self-made pastors and bishops are a serious concern,” said Father James Channan, regional coordinator for the United Religious Initiative. “Without a parish or even church buildings [in some cases], such people attract the poor. This unconsecrated form of preaching usually results in confusion, scandal and controversy,” Channan said, according to CathNews India.Both Catholic and Protestant speakers pressed for joint meetings between the recognized churches to deal with problems arising from the threats posed by terrorism, violence and depression.Meanwhile, in Geneva, Tamara Grdzelidze, program executive of the WCC Commission on Faith and Order, offered various perspectives showing the strength of faith as one uniting factor.In a special service for the week on Jan. 23 at the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva, Grdzelidze said that in Christianity, “defeat changes into victory, the Crucifixion changes into the Resurrection, death … changes into life.”Grdzelidze said that “to follow the Lord, to serve Him and attain the honor of victory over death, we are called to unity in our faith in its manifold expressions whether charitable, prayerful, meditative, active or pro-active. Unity in faith is indeed victory over hatred, wickedness, idle talk, sloth.” In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Anglican Communion, Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 3, 2012 at 12:36 pm UNITY in the Anglican Communion should be much more than prayers … for at present disunity seems to be the on-going concern … be it in the acceptance of a COVENANT, the overt actions against biblical moral teachings or the individual churches’ power structures over matters of faith, tradition, revelations and/or practices. If the trends continue, there might be many Anglican Communions or none at all. The Christian Faith and Practices of PECUSA and other national churches/missions around the world could become so multifaceted and multidysfunctional that the so-called BODY OF CHRIST might just be a multivaried collection of unrecognizable and dispersed body parts … LET US PRAY AND ACT FIRST FOR UNITY WITHIN OURSELVES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ecumenical & Interreligious By ENInews StaffPosted Jan 26, 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service R. A. Garcia says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Comments (1) Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Churches worldwide observe week of prayer for unitylast_img read more

Program, Budget and Finance issues statement on budget completion

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Posted Jul 9, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The following statement has been issued by the members of the Episcopal Church Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance, on July 9 at the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church.The Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance completed its work on the proposed 2013-15 budget on Monday morning, July 9, at 9 a.m. PB&F reviewed the final copy of the budget spreadsheet and adopted it for presentation to the 77th General Convention. The budget is being translated into Spanish and will be forwarded to the printer on Monday afternoon.The schedule of the General Convention precluded receiving more than a few concurred resolutions from the two Houses. However, PB&F believes that it has listened hard to the church, both before General Convention and here in Indianapolis, and is pleased that the budget includes many of the requests for continuing support and for new work.The proposed budget is structured according to the Five Marks of Mission and based on a 19% asking for each year of the 2013-15 Triennium. The proposed budget will be presented to a Joint Session of the General Convention at 2:15 p.m. on Tuesday, July 10.Diane Pollard, Diocese of New York, Chair of Program, Budget and Finance, and Bishop Stephen Lane, Diocese of Maine, vice chair, on behalf of the members of Program, Budget and Finance. Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY General Convention, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI General Convention 2012, Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Program Budget & Finance Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Program, Budget and Finance issues statement on budget completion Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Kenyan Anglican youth to mobilize a million voters

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Kenyan Anglican youth to mobilize a million voters Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth & Young Adults Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs [Anglican Church of Kenya] To mark the 50th anniversary of the Kenya Anglican Youth Organisation (KAYO), its members are launching an initiative aimed at mobilizing one million young people in Kenya to vote in the upcoming General Elections.The youth movement of the Anglican Church in Kenya (ACK), started in 1962 by the late Bishop Obadiah Kariuki, is using its anniversary celebrations to launch the Wajibika Initiative. This youth-led program aims to reach a million young people across Kenya through extensive diocesan structures and encourage them to register and vote.The Wajibika Initiative will also conduct other training in dioceses to empower young people to elect capable and trustworthy leaders who will contribute to the growth of a country along the lines of the reform agenda supported by the church.The anniversary celebrations will be held during the KAYO conference at Senior Chief Koinange Girls’ High School in Kiambu from August 13-18. The youth conference plans to host at least 1,500 Anglican youth from across the nation majority of whom are aged between 18 and 28 years old.Archbishop Eliud Wabukala, primate of the Anglican Church of Kenya, will be the guest of honor among other key national political leaders and dignitaries as well as ACK mission and development partners Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion, Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Faith & Politics, Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY By Joyce MwangiPosted Aug 9, 2012 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Africa, last_img read more

El Salvador: Human rights, justice organizations weary in face of…

first_imgEl Salvador: Human rights, justice organizations weary in face of attack Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion, Press Release Service By Lynette WilsonPosted Nov 18, 2013 Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Featured Eventscenter_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Episcopal News Service] In the aftermath of a Nov. 14 attack on a human rights organization that has worked to find children separated from their families during El Salvador’s 12-year civil war and the abrupt closure in October of the country’s largest war-crime records depository, organizations engaged in social justice and human rights fear a systematic campaign is underway to eliminate the historical record of human rights violations perpetrated during the war.“Although we don’t yet have all the information, it is difficult not [to] interpret the closing of Tutela Legal and the attack against Pro-Búsqueda as reactions to progress in presenting, and one day prosecuting, human rights cases abuses in El Salvador,” said Noah Bullock, the executive director of Foundation Cristosal, a human rights-based community-development organization that began in the Episcopal and Anglican churches headquartered in San Salvador, the small Central American country’s capital.In the early morning hours of Nov. 14, gunmen entered the office of Asociación Pro-Búsqueda de Niñas y Niños Desaparecidos, the association for missing children. They detained three people, removed computers and other equipment, and destroyed files by dousing them with gasoline and setting them on fire.The attack came three days after the Supreme Court heard testimony from survivors – children whose parents were assassinated by government soldiers during a raid in 1982. Pro-Búsqueda represented the survivors in court, where no one from the armed forces showed up.“We regret that these types of violent activities against those of us who seek justice in this country continue. We do not want to return to our past in which these events were commonplace,” said Anglican-Episcopal Church of El Salvador Bishop Martín Barahona in response to the attack. “There is obviously a sector of society that seeks to destabilize the country by these means, and we do not yet know who they are.”In October, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Salvador abruptly closed its legal office, Tutela Legal, which housed an extensive collection of evidence and 50,000 documents related to human rights abuses committed during the country’s 1980-92 civil war.Archbishop Oscar A. Romero, who served the Archdiocese of San Salvador from 1977 until his March 24, 1980, assassination, opened the legal office in his first year as archbishop. During his popular, weekly radio broadcast, Romero regularly read the names of those who’d been murdered, tortured or “disappeared;” many Salvadorans view his assassination as the tipping point toward war.By official estimates, some 75,000 people were killed and countless others were disappeared and tortured during the war, which was fought between the U.S.-supported right-wing government and leftist guerillas.Both the closing of the archdiocese’s legal office and the attack on Pro-Búsqueda come at a time when the country’s Supreme Court considers the constitutionality of its 1993 amnesty law, which has protected perpetrators of human rights abuses committed during the civil war from being prosecuted for their crimes. Last year, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights declared that the amnesty law could not protect those responsible for the massacre at El Mozote, where government soldiers killed some 800 people, half of them children, in December 1981. El Salvador’s Human Rights Ombudsman David Morales condemned the attack on Pro-Búsqueda, saying that such attacks had not happened since the early 1990s, post-war, as reported in the online newspaper El Faro.“It is a worrying resurgence of such acts,” said Morales. Without doubt, he added, the attack was politically motivated and sought to “intimidate, frighten and instill fear” in an atmosphere of impunity.One point in negotiation of the 1992 Peace Accords was the formation of a truth commission to investigate human rights violations that occurred during the civil war. In post-war El Salvador, grassroots human rights and social justice organizations have played a key role is protecting the historical memory and bringing these cases out of the shadows of history.The organizations are demanding the archdiocese release its files back to the victims so that they can choose who represents them in their demands for justice. They also are demanding an investigation into the most recent attacks.“Since the Peace Accords, El Salvador has been experimenting with a negotiated peace without justice,” Bullock said. “Attacks like the one against Pro-Búsqueda last week indicate that the elements of society involved in perpetrating those crimes continue to believe that they can operate above the law with impunity. The burning of human rights offices is not behavior conducive to building a peaceful and democratic society.”In January, in advance of the Feb. 2 presidential primary, Foundation Cristosal will offer a weeklong course for North Americans to study the process of building peace and democracy in post-war El Salvador. Course participants will have the opportunity to speak with politicians, academics and community leaders about the state of peace and democracy, and also to serve as election observers.— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service.  Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. Rector Albany, NY Latin America Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (1) Featured Jobs & Calls Ned Hamson says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA November 20, 2013 at 8:58 am Seems obvious that those who are protected by the amnesty are afraid it will be lifted and then they would be prosecuted for their crimes against humanity – their own citizens. They have hired thugs to do their work and perhaps intimidated the church in El Salvador to duck and run from the people. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Cuerpo de Servicio de Jóvenes Adultos en la Iglesia Episcopal:…

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release [27 de octubre del  2015] Los jóvenes adultos (de 21 a 30 años) tienen la oportunidad de transformar sus propias vidas mientras participan en la misión y en el ministerio en la Comunión Anglicana al unirse al Cuerpo de Servicio de Jóvenes Adultos.Samuel McDonald, Director Deputado de la Sociedad Misionera Doméstica y Extranjera,anunció que las solicitudes están ahora disponibles para las colocaciones del 2016-2017 en el Cuerpo de Servicio de Jóvenes Adultos, conocido comúnmente como YASC.Actualmente los misioneros de YASC están sirviendo en toda la Comunión Anglicana y en varias diócesis internacionales de la Iglesia Episcopal. Trabajan en la administración, la agricultura, las capellanías, el desarrollo, la educación, los ministerios parroquiales y de refugio.  Sirven en Brasil, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Inglaterra, Francia, Haití, Honduras, Hong Kong, Italia, Japón, Panamá, Filipinas, Sudáfrica y Tanzania.“YASC ayuda a los jóvenes adultos a crecer como líderes mediante la profundización de su fe, lo que facilita el compromiso con diversos puntos de vista, el aumento de la confianza, y fomenta el pensamiento creativo e independiente”, escribió recientemente la Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts. “Un año de servicio internacional proporciona a un joven adulto una perspectiva global sobre la vida y la fe, fortaleciendo el liderazgo laico y ordenado dentro y fuera de la Iglesia”.La solicitud con información adicional e instrucciones está disponible aquí.  El plazo de solicitud es el viernes, 8 de enero del 2016.“Los YASCers se colocan en entornos de lengua y cultura diferentes”, continuó la Obispa Presidente. “Esta experiencia intercultural fomenta y profundiza nuevas formas de pensar. Las comunidades multiétnicas de hoy en día pueden ayudar a nutrir una comprensión más profunda del otro y a fortalecer líderes para que ayuden a través de todo tipo de fronteras y división”.Los blogs de YASC con sus pensamientos y reflexiones se encuentran aquí.Cada año hay disponibles nuevas oportunidades de servicio. Entre las posibles ubicaciones para el 2016-17 están Brasil, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Inglaterra, Francia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haití, Honduras, Hong Kong, Italia, Japón, Kenia, México, Panamá, Filipinas, Sudáfrica, Corea del Sur, Tanzania y Zambia.Para más información contacte a Elizabeth Boe, Oficial de Relaciones Globales de la Sociedad  Misionera Doméstica y Extranjera, en [email protected] o a Gracia Flint, Misionera para los Jóvenes Adultos en el Cuerpo de Servicio de la Sociedad Misionera Doméstica y Extranjera en [email protected] aquí para YASC: características, artículos y videos del Servicio Episcopal de Noticias. Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cuerpo de Servicio de Jóvenes Adultos en la Iglesia Episcopal: oportunidades incalculables en toda la Comunión Anglicana Se aceptan solicitudes para las colocaciones en el 2016-2017 Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted Oct 27, 2015 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

In North Baltimore, joint ministry of ‘Lutherpalians’ marks first anniversary…

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In North Baltimore, joint ministry of ‘Lutherpalians’ marks first anniversary together Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ecumenical & Interreligious Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [The Churches of the Nativity and Holy Comforter] For two mainline Protestant congregations – one Episcopal, one Lutheran – that began worshipping together on Nov. 1, 2015, ministry truly is better together.The members of the Lutheran Church of the Holy Comforter, founded in 1911, moved about a half-mile north on York Road to the Episcopal Church of the Nativity, which has worshipped at its chapel at York and Cedarcroft Roads since 1910. The congregations’ members, who jokingly refer to themselves as “Lutherpalians,” now worship and serve the community as The Churches of the Nativity and Holy Comforter. That changes on Sunday, Nov. 6, when they celebrate their anniversary and lose the ‘es.’“It seems like we’ve been together forever,” said the Rev. David W. Eisenhuth, Holy Comforter’s pastor. “We now incorporate elements of the liturgies and hymns from both denominational traditions in a way that seems very natural. We are one church now, so we are losing the ‘es.’” The logo gets an update as well.The Rev. T. Stewart Lucas, Nativity’s rector, agreed. “Looking back, I guess I’m surprised that the skeptics gave it a chance, but they did,” he said. “But, when you are both grounded in the importance of worship, the scriptures and prayer, you understand that these are the things that really matter. Everything else is secondary.”That’s not to suggest there weren’t some hiccups along the way in combining the two congregations. “We had to counter the battle cry that ‘We’ve always done it this way’,” said Eisenhuth.For example, the celebration of the Holy Eucharist, or communion, was an early test of the congregations’ resolve. Holy Comforter traditionally had used leavened bread and offered wine or grape juice by chalice or tiny cups, while Nativity studiously used unleavened wafers and distributed only wine by chalice for The Lord’s Supper.The changes proved too difficult for a few members most committed to Episcopal or Lutheran orthodoxy or “denominationalism.” They have chosen to worship elsewhere. Their places have been filled by new members to Nativity and Holy Comforter, attracted by the friendliness of the joint congregation, where people of different racial, ethnic and economic backgrounds and sexual identities are welcomed.The two congregations maintain their status as separate legal entities. But, in almost every other aspect, they worship and minister together as one church body. Members of both congregations sing in the choir, handle the flower arrangements, serve on the Altar Guild, and share duties as ushers. Holy Comforter members stepped up to help at Nativity’s Annual Spring Fair, supporting a tradition that has continued for decades. Nativity members brought their sewing skills to Holy Comforter’s Christian Action Group, which makes beautiful quilts for distribution to the homeless.Attendance at Sunday worship services has roughly doubled what it had been prior to the partnership. “It feels good to have more people in the pews. We are more energetic and more creative as a combined church body,” said Lucas. “Two churches that were dwindling chose to come together. Now, we are rising.”The unusual pairing of churches from different denominations has garnered the attention of national church groups, not only Episcopal and Lutheran but other mainstream Christian denominations facing some of the same problems that had challenged Nativity and Holy Comforter. Teams of church leaders and academics have visited to learn firsthand what is going on in North Baltimore.“We have been a beacon for other churches that are struggling,” said Lucas. “Now we are looking out into the community to see where God wants us to do more ministry. We are about to purchase the 8000 square foot office building and parking lot next door. Who knows what God has in store for us next?”Eisenhuth added, “We had members who said they wanted a Lutheran worship service. What does that mean? Increasingly, denominations will become passé and not that important. We needed to overcome fear of the future, fear of change.”Both clergymen credited their respective bishops, from the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland and the Delaware-Maryland Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, for permitting this experimental partnership to go forward.The congregation will celebrate their anniversary on Sunday, Nov. 6, at 10:30 a.m. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted Nov 2, 2016 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Reacting to Charlottesville violence, Long Island removes Confederate memorial from…

first_img August 21, 2017 at 11:32 pm Right on Lucy. By Amy SowderPosted Aug 16, 2017 August 21, 2017 at 3:44 pm AMEN Lucy! Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI August 17, 2017 at 4:14 pm Good commentary from Doug, Bill and Pjcabbiness. Commentary that will, as usual, be completely and totally ignored by most of our wise and noble Episcopal clergy! August 16, 2017 at 8:46 pm “There’s a big difference between a historical figure who owned slaves and one who led a war against the United States to preserve slavery, El-Yateen said.”Rev. El-Yateen of course speaks only for himself. Latter-day iconoclasts always need a new image to tear down tomorrow, so when all the Confederate memorials are gone, I’m not counting on an outbreak of self-restraint.Considering the congregation was long gone and the property was actually under contract to be sold, this does not rank as more than cringeworthy EC virtue signaling to me. Terry Francis says: Comments (29) Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET August 17, 2017 at 3:36 pm I never thought I would see the day when our Episcopal leadership would condone and actively support historical “cleansing”. There is another so called religious group that is also known for tearing down statues and destroying historical artifacts. I believe they are commonly known as ISIS. Rector Tampa, FL August 16, 2017 at 7:53 pm Which part of fighting to uphold slavery is “perceived insensitivity”? Cause I am pretty sure that slavery was an actual thing that happened. Nothing perceived about it. In terms of its insensitivity if you don’t get that I can’t help you. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC August 16, 2017 at 8:29 pm The above is such a silly and inaccurate analogy that it doesn’t deserve an answer. You need to realize who the Philistines are in this instance. Susan Zimmerman says: Susan Steinmann says: Crew working with the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island saw into one of the plaques commemorating Robert E. Lee. Photo: Episcopal Diocese of Long Island[Episcopal News Service] A work crew sawed off two Robert E. Lee plaques from a tree on church property in south Brooklyn, New York, fewer than 24 hours after the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island received the first of many calls about the Confederate memorial.The Rev. Khader El-Yateem, a community activist and founder of Salam Arabic Lutheran Church in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bay Ridge, made the first call, responding to concerns he heard Monday from community residents.At issue: Two tree plaques at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Fort Hamilton, near the still-active military base in Brooklyn. More than a decade before Robert E. Lee led the Confederate Army, he was stationed from 1842 to 1847 at the U.S. Army’s Fort Hamilton. He was a member of the church, along with Stonewall Jackson, who was baptized there, said Long Island Bishop Lawrence Provenzano. Lee planted a tree near the church, and the plaques commemorate him.The first Brooklyn plaque was placed in front of a maple tree in April 1912 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy, according to the sign, near where Lee had once planted a tree. The tree died, and the Confederate group replanted it in the 1930s, and then again in the 1960s, Provenzano said. The church’s last service was in September 2014, and the building is under contract to be sold. The congregation merged with Christ Church in Bay Ridge.El-Yateem called the diocese at 10:30 a.m. Aug. 15. By 10 a.m. Aug. 16, the plaques were being taken down, to be stored in diocesan archives. He said he’s grateful for the quick response. “We needed to take that sign down in support and solidarity of those who are victims of hate and racism in this country,” El-Yateem said.The removal was covered by local and national media, and was featured on social media platforms. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA DOUGLAS REGISTER says: Margaret Kuebler says: August 17, 2017 at 1:23 am One would think that this Episcopal church, in fact, is a Catholic church. I guess they showed Robert E. Lee (and soon Stonewall Jackson) what ex-communication is all about! But, even the Catholics when they seek to ex-communicate (for rebellious or anti-church establishment or non-“religiously correct” behaviors) draw the line at a parishioner’s death, don’t they? This church holds the right to banish-from-the-congregation for centuries after the death! This, too, is revealing. In effect, “Kill that dead person. Just the thought of him, but especially the sight of his image preserved in an art form and displayed in a public place, just might upset a ‘victim’ somewhere.”Makes one wonder exactly who are the true “victims” of “hate” and “racism” in America, doesn’t it? We neglect to mention those killed on 9/11, and their survivors, in this debate on the “victims” of “hate” and “racism” in the U.S, less than 20 years after their deaths, as we are coerced to embrace new Muslim refugees into our country. At the same time, we eagerly want to give solace and support and to show solidarity to persons who still mourn the lives of American slaves … who died over 150 years ago. Under the Doctrine of Political Correctness, we may not seek to rid our country of radical Islam, or any of its symbols, even if its followers seek to overthrow our government and to kill all of us based on our race and religion; yet, to make amends for a racist cultural practice ended over 150 years ago, we are amenable to purging our society of every artifact which may memorialize the historical figures connected to this practice. This hypocrisy is so blatant that it is mind-blowing. Whatever is going on here, in substance, has little to nothing to do either with “race” or with “hate or with supporting “victims.” Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA August 16, 2017 at 10:09 pm When we start erasing our history, we will forget it. Since George Washington was a slave owner should we erase all statues of him and delete from all history books all mention of him. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS DOUGLAS REGISTER says: Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Scott Albergate says: Doug Desper says: John Miller says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ August 17, 2017 at 4:21 pm Richard Basta, I could not agree with you more. A shame that our priests and bishops couldn’t care less about opinions such as yours. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York August 17, 2017 at 11:57 am “Well paid bishops, activists, and social justice warriors have it easy. Their main nightmare is to not look bad for the media.”Doug Desper has it exactly right. Their own personal competitive professional status is basically what is motivating virtually all of the church people in the Charlottesville mess and the Episcopal hierarchy seems to be about the worst. Common sense is completely missing. Sadly, this is the name of the game these days and one can assume that the end result will be the complete demise of the Church. Destroying monuments is just the tip of the iceberg. Pjcabbiness says: August 17, 2017 at 12:01 pm Thank you Doug Desper and Bill Louis for your thoughtful, factual analysis and commentary. Hugh Hansen, Ph.D. says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tony Oberdorfer says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 August 17, 2017 at 2:36 pm Why are people so concerned that removing statues and plaques will somehow erase 19th history from the face of the earth? People seemed to remember before these memorials were raised. It’s highly doubtful that books will disappear. Reenactments will still take place. I’m certain that the Sons of Confederate Veterans will continue to exist. So why is it so important for these items to remain in place? Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Brooklyn removal was part of a wave of swift actions taken by leaders across the United States to remove public memorials of Confederate leaders. The removals come days after white supremacists, white nationalists and neo-Nazis converged onto the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville this past weekend, protesting the removal of a Lee statue. After violent clashes with counter-protestors, three people were killed and dozens injured. Clergy from Charlottesville’s three Episcopal churches were part of a peaceable faith-based contingent of the counter-protesters, and none were injured.Bishop Lawrence Provenzano addresses reporters with Pastor Khader El-Yateem outside of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Fort Hamilton before the plaques were removed. Photo: Episcopal Diocese of Long Island“We’re in a mess with the rhetoric coming out of the White House and how people are feeling emboldened by the rhetoric,” Provenzano said. “I think this is a moment for the church. We’ve got to preach the gospel and more importantly, live it. Shame on us for not removing those plaques before it was brought to our attention. This pastor reminded us that when people pass this church property, there’s a commemoration to a general who fought to preserve slavery.”In the last two days, Provenzano’s office has fielded about 120 calls and emails about the church’s plaques, a ratio of 2-to-1 in favor of removal, from his estimation. The negative calls and emails included people he identified as neo-Nazi and white supremacist. “Those were nasty,” Provenzano said.Responding to President Donald Trump’s Tuesday afternoon press conference in which he warned of the slippery slope of removing statues of historical figures who had anything to do with owning slaves, including Presidents Jefferson and Washington, El-Yateem said that’s not the same. There’s a big difference between a historical figure who owned slaves and one who led a war against the United States to preserve slavery, El-Yateem said.“General Lee needs to be remembered, but not celebrated in our churches and streets. Because of his actions, over 300,000 people died as he fought to preserve slavery in this country,” El-Yateem said.The plaques and statues shouldn’t be erased, but kept in archives and in museums, he said.“We’re not denying history, and maybe that some of those times, the church was complicit in it,” Provenzano said. “If we did nothing, I think that would have made us complicit in furthering the concerns of people that issues like this are not important enough for the church to pay attention to.“I think we did the right thing.”— Amy Sowder is a freelance writer and editor in Brooklyn. August 16, 2017 at 8:25 pm History is not to be loved or hated, but chronicled and studied to learn what it may teach us for the future. When we start letting others erase and rewrite our history, we will soon start letting those others to write our future as they choose to see it. August 17, 2017 at 3:54 pm After a thoughtful and deliberative process of reading this article and its comments, I conclude that Doug despar has it right. The ECUSA is indeed engaging in historical censorship of the worst kind in order to curry favor with their pre approved list if agreived parties. It is morally despicable. Guilty on all counts of idiocy in the first degree. Richard Brown says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Belleville, IL Terry Francis says: M. J. Wise says: Rector Albany, NY Clare Nesmith says: Lucy Mauterer says: center_img Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC August 17, 2017 at 7:56 pm You’re so political correct I’m sure Jesus really loves you for doing this…maybe you’ll destroy the Temple Mount next, for all the beautiful animals slaughtered on Sabbath mornings…can you imagine a child watching the liturgy of killing a lamb……do you remember “…forgive them father for they don’t know what they’re doing…”? Now there is a response!!! Charlottesville, Comments are closed. August 17, 2017 at 6:57 am Would we commemorate an American who sold state secrets to a foreign government? The Confederates were no less traitors who sought secession. Good riddance to their memorials and keeping alive this hypocrisy. Racial Justice & Reconciliation This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET August 16, 2017 at 7:28 pm Very sad, thoughtless and reactionary. Should the Statue of David be removed because of perceived historical insensitivity to the Phillistines? This historic purging is Stalinist at its core. August 17, 2017 at 11:04 am The story mentions that Yateem is an activist but if you dig you will find it goes deeper that that.Not surprising that a socialist like Pastor Yateem would like to erase history. If you look into his background, which is not mentioned in the story you will find that Khader El-Yateem is a not only a priest but also candidate for Bay Ridge City Council. Candidate Khader El-Yateem thinks Southwest Brooklyn Is ready for socialism and he plans to protect the city’s undocumented immigrants.His opponent Bob Capano has called for him to renounce the words of radical Muslim activist Linda Sarsour, who recently called for a “Jihad” against President Trump while speaking to the Islamic Society of North America’s convention in Chicago.“Khader El- Yateem has never hidden the fact that he is a cleric. If he is a man of God, he needs to speak out against Linda Sarsour’s hate-filled rant. If he won’t denounce Sarsour, then he should explain to the voters why not. He already has refused to disavow the endorsement of the radical New York City Democratic Socialist of America who oppose ‘an economy organized for private profit’ in a city that was built on capitalism.” says CapanoSound familiar?Regarding removal of the memorial Yateem says, ““If we did nothing, I think that would have made us complicit in furthering the concerns of people that issues like this are not important enough for the church to pay attention to.If that is so then I wonder why he thinks that people concerned with Sarsour’s words of hate are not important enough for him, as a pastor to pay attention to. Sounds a bit hypocritical to me but then it if doesn’t fit a liberal/progressive/socialist narrative then it doesn’t matter August 16, 2017 at 8:34 pm I hope you read the history of Gen Lee and the history of the demolishing of reconstruction by southern leaders who installed Jim Crowe. You should know that Gen Lee was active in this effort, that he held slaves and sold a mother and a child to different buyers, and that the president at the end of the War wanted to try Lee for treason (most of his fellow Virginia military personnel joined the Northern side) since he had taken an oath to defined and support the USA.Those statues, many of them were in response to reconstruction efforts, and memorials were in defiance of the country.I think it is appropriate for them to be removed but some should be given to museums or historicalsocieties so we never forget this sordid, sinful timein our country. August 17, 2017 at 1:29 pm Since the effort is now underway to destroy history, which city will be first to empty their libraries of every “evil” on their shelves? ECUSA is step-by-step allowing the glory to depart its grand halls of worship. Will it ever get back to spreading the good news? Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Susan Zimmerman says: Pjcabbiness says: Pjcabbiness says: Submit a Job Listing Pjcabbiness says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA August 16, 2017 at 11:36 pm We assume it is to protect these artifacts from vandalism at these times of alt-left hooliganism. Richard Basta says: Doug Desper says: Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Terry Francis says: Fr Sean Patrick Henry Maloney says: Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 August 17, 2017 at 7:57 pm You’re so political correct I’m sure Jesus really loves you for doing this…maybe you’ll destroy the Temple Mount next, for all the beautiful animals slaughtered on Sabbath mornings…can you imagine a child watching the liturgy of killing a lamb……do you remember “…forgive them father for they don’t know what they’re doing…”? Now there is a response!!! Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT August 16, 2017 at 11:09 pm Only Black & White – the message the Church is sending that no act of goodness or piety must be associated with a person they classify as an evildoer. This is revealing. William Brown says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group James D. Saunders says: August 16, 2017 at 8:34 pm Why did the UDCs (United Daughters of the Confederacy) erect a plaque honoring General Lee, the leader of the Army of the Confederacy in the North? At the time that they did? To reinforce Jim Crow. To perpetuate the romantic myth of the Lost Cause. We don’t need that in the Episcopal Church. (And note well: I am a child of the South. My grandmother was a UDC and I was a member of the C of C – the Children of the Confederacy. As a child I did not know any better. As an adult and as a more mature Christian, I do.) I am proud of the Bishop and the Diocese for removing that plaque. Reacting to Charlottesville violence, Long Island removes Confederate memorial from Episcopal church Featured Events August 17, 2017 at 11:03 am I would hope that none of us would ever face the agonizing issues that Robert E. Lee (among others) had to choose from. He could not have been as wicked as represented since President Lincoln chose him to command the Union Army at the onset of the Civil War. Our generation views everything from the perspective of the Civil Rights era struggles, but as great as those struggles were (and are) there was a monumental struggle even worse than race relations when Lincoln asked Lee to lead the Union army. The struggle that Lee agonized over was how to live and serve in a country whose national army was to swell from 16,000 to 91,000. A 75,000 man army was being raised solely to occupy communities all over the United States and to enforce national policy at the point of a bayonet. In other words, martial law and dictatorship. Many of those troops were of questionable quality, some didn’t even speak English, but yet they were issued authority and weapons to live among civilian populations. Lee declined and went home to resist. Even Union General McClellan who took Lee’s place saw the disaster of warring on one’s own country and he slow-walked his troops towards battles in the hopes that sanity would prevail in Washington. Freeing slaves wasn’t even a war aim of that conflict until 1863. Before that the aim was to have the entire country conform to Washington’s policies. The history of the Civil War shows what martial law, and abolishing the writ of habeus corpus was like. The great injustices of federal dictatorship was seen in both the North and the South. We have not lived that nightmare. If Lee is guilty of anything it is that he wasn’t superhuman and had to pick between horrors.Well paid bishops, activists, and social justice warriors have it easy. Their main nightmare is to not look bad for the media. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Jim Gilchrist says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR August 17, 2017 at 12:45 pm Khader El- Yateem is looking for a straw man diversion to ingratiate himself to his voter base. In the same way, Charlottesville’s Vice-Mayor (Wes Bellamy) has brought divisive racial agendas to his role on that city’s Council. Google both men. Both men want to lead in government and in their wake there is usually some great social upheaval. Both men have buttons that they press to light up phones and cameras for a media-ready cause. Both men have active histories of intolerance and division. Bellamy’s Twitter life revealed who he is for any reporter that has the care to vett him. Before enshrining him as a noble warrior opposed to racism just look up his statements and internet activity. Losing his job as a teacher over his extreme views and hate speech is just one tiny fact that few in the media are catching on to. In short, there are clever and divisive far left image-makers playing on people’s sympathies and creating artificial storms for their own political aggrandizement. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA August 19, 2017 at 6:09 pm This Confederate hysteria is just disgusting. I’m disappointed in the Episcopal Church which has gone full blown progressive in recent years. In this instance, they are acting like ISIS, removing anything that “offends”. You preach tolerance and yet you are not. August 17, 2017 at 5:37 am I hope you have read the history of General Lee, who had nothing to do with Jim Crow, and who behaved honorably from before the war until his death. His decision to take a side in the conflict and to become an advisor to President Davis was one which caused him a lot of personal grief to have to make, and which was ultimately based on his loyalty to Virginia–in a time when most people felt loyalty to their respective home states (which, after all, under the Constitution remain sovereign) rather than to the federal government. He behaved gallantly at Appomattox, and his calm voice after the war–which included his wish, not followed, that Confederate memorials should not be erected–was one which made Reconstruction under President Johnson’s plan palatable to the southerners whom the Republicans treated abysmally during their occupation. It was Lee’s reason and calming voice that made him a hero not only to the defeated Confederates, but to the northerners as well–which explains why any number of schools and public buildings in Illinois, Ohio and Michigan (not exactly places that would obviously warm quickly to a commander of the erstwhile enemy) have been named in his honor; he was not only a Confederate hero, but genuinely an American one. And, it should be pointed out, he had freed his slaves in 1862, before he entered into combat with the Army of Northern Virginia, and well before Ulysses Grant was forced to free his, after was Missouri was emancipated in 1865.I find this mad rush to revise history and to vilify people like Lee disheartening and, really, absurd. It is particularly sad that this particular memorial notes not just any particular historical figure, but an historical figure who is also a former member of that very congregation.Of course this is no the first time our church has been affected by popular foment: we might recall that in a fit of passion following the English Civil War, the artwork, especially stained glass windows, in many of England’s churches and cathedrals was destroyed, often overnight to avoid conflicts with dissenters, in much the same way to erase the memory and therefor the history of the Church of England. We see now that this did not make England a richer country, nor her church more pure. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bill Louis says: Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Indigenous Global Ecumenical Gathering meets in New Zealand

first_img Indigenous Ministries The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia and the Anglican Missions Board in Rotorua are hosting the World Council of Churches for its 2018 Indigenous Global Ecumenical Gathering (IGEG) and youth pre-meeting. The gathering, running from July 18 to 23 in Ohinemutu, a Maori village and a suburb of Rotorua in New Zealand, welcomes up to 200 indigenous participants from around the globe.Read the full article here. Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Posted Jul 19, 2018 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Indigenous Global Ecumenical Gathering meets in New Zealand Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Communion, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Ecumenical & Interreligious, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more

Connecticut diocese resolves case of abuse claims from 1984 against…

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Connecticut diocese resolves case of abuse claims from 1984 against retired St. John the Divine dean Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Very Rev. James Kowalski speaks at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York on May 22, 2017. Photo: Cathedral of St. John the Divine[Episcopal News Service] The Very Rev. James Kowalski, who served as the dean of New York’s Cathedral of St. John the Divine from 2002 to 2017, has reached an agreement with the Episcopal Church in Connecticut to end a clergy misconduct case involving sexual abuse allegations from 1984.Kowalski was accused of engaging in “acts of sexual abuse and sexual exploitation” with a college freshman who had previously been a parishioner at a church he served in Newtown, Connecticut; the diocese did not specify her age except to say she was under 21 at the time, meaning there is no statute of limitations for making the allegation under the church’s Title IV disciplinary process. Kowalski, now 68 and retired, would have been 33 at the time.“The claims that have been put forth, about an incident alleged to have happened more than 30 years ago, are deeply upsetting to me and my family,” Kowalski wrote in an email to Episcopal News Service. “Although there are aspects of [the] accord that I do not agree with, I believe it is in the best interest of me, my family and the church.”The accord, announced on July 17, resolves the Title IV case against Kowalski. Kowalski agreed to the accord after the diocese decided that the case would proceed to a hearing panel, which is similar to a trial court. The accord means the case is settled and will not go to a hearing panel.“This was an extremely difficult decision, but I believe that going through a contested hearing process would have provided neither healing nor resolution,” Kowalski told ENS.The terms of the accord have not been made public; possible outcomes in these types of cases include suspension and deposition (being removed from the clergy). The accord did not exercise either of these options, according to Robin Hammeal-Urban of the diocese’s Office of Mission Integrity & Training.Rather, the accord has “put in place other actions to bring healing to those who have been hurt and safety to those who might be at risk,” Hammeal-Urban told ENS.The complainant came forward about a year ago, said Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, who told ENS that he remains committed to working toward “wholeness and healing for all involved, and also with respect to matters of accountability and transparency and honesty.”Kowalski was the dean of St. John the Divine, seat of the Diocese of New York and one of the largest cathedrals in the world, for 15 years until his retirement in 2017. Before that, he served at several parishes in Connecticut. According to the diocesan statement laying out the charges of sexual misconduct and conduct unbecoming of a clergy member, the complainant first knew Kowalski as a priest in her parish – Trinity Episcopal Church in Newtown – starting around 1978, when she was in middle school. The complainant alleged that six years later, when she was a college freshman and Kowalski was serving at the Church of the Good Shepherd in Hartford, he visited her and kissed her “against her will … in a sexually explicit manner,” embraced her and asked her to lie in bed with him.The case will not be referred to law enforcement, Hammeal-Urban said.“Had the alleged offenses occurred before the complainant’s 18th birthday, then child protective services in the state of Connecticut would have immediately been notified,” she told ENS.In his own statement, New York Bishop Andrew Dietsche said that “during the fifteen years that [Kowalski] served as the dean of the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, no allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior were ever received by the Board of Trustees of the cathedral, nor by the bishop of New York. We remain proud of his exemplary performance as dean of our cathedral, and of the spirit with which he cooperated with the investigation in the Diocese of Connecticut.”– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ People Rector Shreveport, LA By Egan MillardPosted Jul 20, 2020 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more