Drunk Shoppers Blow 48B Annually—Mostly on Amazon

first_img I do most of my shopping from the comfort of my couch: In the digital age, there’s no reason to leave the house for groceries, clothes, home furnishings, or basically anything else.But with great retail power comes great responsibility.Luckily for Amazon, many Americans are not responsible.A recent survey by The Hustle found that drunk shopping is an estimated $48 billion industry—a majority of the profits funneling straight into Jeff Bezos’s pockets.Among a sample of more than 2,000 alcohol-consuming adults, nearly 80 percent admitted to making at least one drunk purchase.(via Zachary Crockett/The Hustle)And they’re not always bargain-basement buys: Poor sap Ryan Green, sporting a beer buzz when Justin Timberlake took the stage at last year’s Super Bowl halftime show, spent $378.80 on two tickets to see the blond bombshell in concert.“I woke up the next day and found a confirmation email I didn’t remember,” he told The Hustle.Embarrassing as that is, Green is not alone.Men and women alike spend an average $444 annually on intoxicated investments—mostly clothes and shoes, though sometimes high-brow purchases, like admission to a Mickey Mouse Club star-turned-pop icon/actor/philanthropist concert.(As well as life-size cardboard cut-outs of Kim Jong-un, a World War II-era bayonet, various international flights, a trilogy of Satanic religious books, and 30-pound bags of Idaho potatoes.)(via Zachary Crockett/The Hustle)According to The Hustle’s data, Millennials and GenXers with disposable income are inebriated e-commerce’s key demographic.“Certain professionals also seem … more inclined to shop drunk than others,” Hustler Zachary Crockett wrote in a blog post, highlighting sports, transport, oil and energy, recruiting, and marketing jobs as usual suspects.“Given the inseparable bond between sports and beer [the alcohol of choice for tipsy online browsing], the list topper isn’t too surprising,” Crockett generalized. “Nor are the highly social jobs of recruiting and marketing. What’s slightly more concerning is that transportation and oil and energy (sectors known for long, often solitary work hours) boast near-universal drunk shopping habits.”Folks who make a living off of writing, art, education, computer engineering, or retail, meanwhile, are statistically less likely to slurp and spent.“Tortured, oft-inebriated chroniclers of the human experience are actually far less likely to drunk shop,” the pigeonholing continued. “A possible explanation is that these jobs fall into lower-income brackets … But we’d like to think they’re just anti-consumerists.”(via Zachary Crockett/The Hustle)In the end, it’s Amazon that wins out, accounting for 85 percent of drunken online purchases.Despite unwittingly acquiring, say, 200 lbs of fresh bamboo, a full-size inflatable bouncy castle, a $2,200 pair of night vision goggles, or an NRA membership, most people don’t regret their shopping spree.Only 20 percent of survey takers end up returning the unwanted “To be honest, they’re almost always stupid buys, but the humor factor outweighs the stupidity,” one respondent told The Hustle. “I guess it’s a privileged way to look at consumption. … But how many people can say they own a personalized Chia Pet?”More on Geek.com:Drunk Man ‘Accidentally’ Buys Live Peacock, Salamander on Singles’ DayInstagram Rolls Out In-App Shopping FeatureAnonymous Online Shopping Don’t Come Easy—Or Cheap Stay on target Amazon Personal Shopper Service Ushers In Curated FashionToys “R” Us Returns This Holiday Season as ‘Interactive’ Experience last_img

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