The Rugby Week in Review: June 27 – July 3

first_img Catch up in the Rugby week that was: June 27 – July 3… Sorry its a long one… BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – JULY 04: Will Genia runs with the ball during a Queensland Reds Super Rugby training session at Ballymore Stadium on July 4, 2011 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Chris Hyde/Getty Images) Week in Review: June 13-19 |   June 6-12 |   May 30 – June 5 |    May 23-29 |    May 16-22 |    May 9-15 |     May 2 – 8 In the wake of ticket sales, National team kits are steadily becoming the summer trend. Scotland, Wales, France and South Africa have all revealed their surprising (I never said it was a good surprise) new strips in time for the summer internationals. Obviously wanting to start a revolution, Wales have gone one step further and have stepped out with a state of the art kit. Check out their innovative kit material…Other side of the world…Down on the South Island, Ma’a Nonu has secured a rugby future, similar to that of James Haskell. The dreaded midfielder has re-signed with the NZRU for a further two years and has also guaranteed Super Rugby play in 2012/13, after signing with Auckland based Blues. After the World Cup, Skux will head to Japan to join James Haskell at Tokyo based Ricoh Black Rams.Making our way into the Southern Hemisphere, Super Rugby semi-finals took place in Brisbane and Cape Town. The Reds were able to beat the Blues for a second time this year, 30-13, to claim a spot in the final as Suncorp, on July 9th. If you didn’t check it out, you’re definately missing out. The things Quade Cooper, with partner Will Genia are capable of, is astounding.On the other side of the ocean, the Crusaders easily raced passed the Stormers to join the Reds in Brisbane next weekend. Got some time? Check out highlights of both semi’s here…center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Will Genia – A beast at a game of Bulldogs! News out of the England camp is that James Haskell will return to London Wasps for the 2012/13 season via Japan. Before he heads back to the club where he became a household name, James will join Tokyo based, Ricoh Black Rams after the World Cup. He has obviously developed the travel bug, as he intends to also play a season in the Super Rugby franchise before he returns to London.On a history front, England’s oldest rugby player, Brian Pope celebrated his centenary birthday on the 26th of June. The RFU presented him with an engraved silver salver and the England Rugby Internationals Club will also be giving him a framed picture and match report from his England playing days. Pope received Cambridge Blues for rugby and represented Blackheath. However he is also famed for a hole-in-one on the St. George’s course in Sandwich, which this year will host the Open. Applause all round!Between the 19-23 June, rugby fans got together with the Munster squad in the Cycle for Paul Darbyshire. He was head of strength and conditioning at Munster, and was diagnosed with Motor Neurone disease in September. Sadly Paul passed away on Monday 20th June, on the second day of the journey. Here’s a moving clip from stage 1 of the journey…The England U20 boys made it into the Junior Rugby Championships in Italy and faced a very strong Baby Blacks side. The game highlighted the talent and strength of both sides as they went head to head in Padova. The New Zealanders were victorious, claiming a 33-22 win over England. This means that the Baby Blacks (Don’t really believe they are all under 20) are yet to be beaten in the history of the U20 tournament. Check out the highlights…World Cup time…Preparations for the World Cup are going well, especially ticket sales. Tournament organizer the RNZ have announced that they have hit the £100 million mark in sales, showing that the rugby community are totally behind the event. Tickets are going fast. Have you got yours yet?last_img read more

What’s inside the latest Rugby World?

first_imgTour Tale – RW’s very own Alan Dymock on an interesting trip to RomeFor the latest subscription offers, click here. Find out who and what features in the June 2015 edition of Rugby World magazine LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Euro stars – A picture special of players who have set the bar in Europe this seasonThe Big Debate – Is the foreign influx bad for European rugby?World Cup make or break – For every tale of injury woe, there’s a player who takes their opportunity at a RWCRing-fencing – Stephen Jones explains why the Premiership must not become a closed shopFourie du Preez – Find out about the Springbok scrum-half’s unusual World Cup preparationBrian O’Driscoll – RW hangs out with the Ireland legend at the Hong Kong SevensADVICE
Pro Insight – Wales fly-half Dan Biggar explains how to kick to regainJump start: Wales fly-half Dan Biggar leaps for a high ball against South Africa. Photo: Huw Evans AgencyNutrition – How to keep food fun, including a recipeFitness – How to scrummage like Dan ColePro Playbook – London Irish coach Glenn Delaney explains a lineout moveMini Rugby – Play Fuzzball and learn how to do post movesREGULARS
Rugby Focus – A news round-up from clubs, schools and women’s rugby, including an interview with New Zealand Sevens captain Sarah GossEssentials – The latest books and products, including four of the best rucksacksUncovered – Jason Robinson charts his journey from schoolboy to World Cup winnercenter_img TAGS: Highlight Big stars and big issues both feature in the new edition of Rugby World. As well as interviews with international players like Courtney Lawes, Liam Williams, Fourie du Preez, Conor Murray and Adam Ashe, Ireland legend Brian O’Driscoll gives us his unique insight on the Hong Kong Sevens.On top of all that, we look at the influx of foreign players to Europe and whether that is good or bad for the game. Plus, Stephen Jones gives his views on the rumours that the Aviva Premiership clubs want to put an end to relegation and become a closed shop.Here’s a list of contents – and find out where to buy your copy here or get our free magazine finder app here. Plus, download the digital edition here.NEWS
Sevens players to watch, the European Cup, 30 minutes with Glasgow’s Pete Horne, the Bournemouth Sevens, pre-season competitions, Hotshots and moreCOLUMNISTS
Mark Cueto – The Sale wing talks through his impending retirementThe Secret Player – Pro rugby isn’t glamorous, insists our former internationalJonathan Kaplan – The former Test referee says officials need to use more common senseSPOTLIGHTS
Dave Ewers – Exeter’s burly back-row talks kayaking, chillies and staying in the fightJustin Tipuric – The Ospreys flanker is excited about the Guinness Pro12 play-offsTim Visser – The Scotland wing believes joining Quins will reinvigorate his gameNiall Morris – Leicester’s Irish wing talks about searching for a silver liningFEATURES
Courtney Lawes – The England lock on big hits, the World Cup and fatherhoodConor Murray – He’s lifted a trophy with Ireland this season and now the scrum-half is chasing success with MunsterOpening up: Conor Murray talks Ireland and Munster in the new issue of RW. Photo: InphoAdam Ashe – Meet the music-loving Scotland No 8 who is also a DJLiam Williams – RW talks to the Scarlets full-back who’s bounced back from criticism to star for Wales this seasonlast_img read more

When Rugby World went on tour with the Barbarians…

first_imgHere’s what happened when we went on tour with one of the game’s most beloved sides, the Barbarians. This feature first appeared in the January 2017 issue of the magazine. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS STANDING AT the mouth of a tunnel that slopes down towards Marketa Stadium’s pitch – a postage stamp of grass in the middle of a speedway track, teased towards looking like a rugby field for the first time in its existence – Barbarians coach Robbie Deans looks ecstatic.The world’s most famous invitational club side are in Prague on a goodwill mission, helping the locals celebrate the 90th birthday of the Czech Republic union. Despite losing 71-0 and with a crucial European fixture against Lithuania mere days away, the Czechs are just as happy as the Kiwi coach. Filing into the Barbarians changing rooms to swap shirts, dodging a gauntlet of proffered pints and cigars, they have the air of men crushed merrily by all the things in life they have ever wanted.The Baa-Baas are only a few days past a bewitching 31-31 draw with South Africa at Wembley, in which two tries, scored by tour captain Andy Ellis and Aussie wing Luke Morahan, should be stitched into the folklore of the famous club forever. The party are now looking ahead to a game in Belfast two days later, against Fiji. No one looks fazed.In your face: Highlander Matt Faddes tangles with the Czechs (pic: Martin Flousek)“This game is perfect (in a busy schedule), that’s why I chose it,” a grinning Deans tells Rugby World. “I’d rather play and do something for the game, which is what we’ve done here. The Czechs are buzzing. They absolutely loved it. They did some good things.”This was so much more than just a kick-around for the hosts. This was the first Czech match shown live on national (state) television. The day before, the Barbarians gave up an hour to coach some children, helped by Jan Machácek – an ex-Sale and Pontypridd back-row who’s the only man from the Czech Republic to represent the Barbarians. And the Barbarians Trust has just given more than 150,000 Czech koruna (approximately £5,000) to help their game. What does that say about the club? Deans reflects.“The Barbarians are the gatekeepers of the soul of the game. They encapsulate everything that’s good about the game – playing for the love of the game. While it’s professional, if money is the determining factor in the way you take to your work then it’s all over. The point of difference in teams that succeed is actually the teamwork, playing for the pure reasons. The same reasons that always motivated blokes before there was ever money in the game. It’s often missed but it’s great for these guys to be exposed to that ethos again, as a reminder of what it’s all about.”“the Barbarians are gatekeepers of the soul of the game”HAVING SPENT time with the Barbarians, this article cannot urge you to forget everything you know about the Baa-Baas. There are many traditions alive and well. Instead, this piece puts forth a plea to supplement what you know about those who pull on the black and white. As Australia tighthead Paddy Ryan eloquently puts it: “People from the outside think we do it because we like smacking p**s (drinking) – and for a lot of guys that is true – but it’s not the main thing that drives a good group.”Giving back: Training with local children in Prague (pic: Martin Flousek)In the past the Barbarians have got it right and they have got it wrong. In 2010 a star-packed side beat South Africa at Twickenham, 26-20. It was a celebration of all the joy of the invitational side that brought us the ‘Greatest Try of All Time’ against the All Blacks in 1973. But those who have been part of the back-room team for a while still cringe at the thought of the humbling by the 2013 Lions in Hong Kong – a perfect storm of veterans enjoying themselves too much, harsh humidity and a foe so fired up at the start of a tour nothing could douse them. They lost 59-8 and many swore: “Never again.”On this tour is Steve Berrick, the man who assumes all the risk in underwriting Barbarians events, from stadium hire to contracting players. While part of his gig is doing deals with unions, there is a glimmering silver lining ahead, with England an established regular opponent and designs for a tour to Japan or South Africa in the summer, amongst others.It was also Berrick who negotiated with the agents of the young group in Prague. There’s a buzz in camp. They know they got it right. Super Rugby’s rising stars are here. Richard ‘The Barracuda’ Buckman, of the Highlanders, is rubbing shoulders with versatile Brumbies forward Sam Carter. Giddy Crusader Jordan Taufua is shooting the breeze with the group tour guide, Nic Stirzaker of the Rebels. There are plenty of South Africa’s Lions around. It’s an exciting mix. Very early on, Deans brought in Ellis and Luke Whitelock, men he knew from his days in Crusaders rugby, to decide on a tour direction. There are a few long-established names in the group but the bulk of it is made up of firecracker talents who are kicking and screaming outside the door of Test rugby.There are younger committee men too. Rory Lawson, the ex-Scotland scrum-half, has replaced John Jeffrey as the Scottish voice on the panel. Many in rugby will know of Micky Steele-Bodger, the club’s emblematic president, who at 91 is still an enormous presence. He is the Barbarians in so many ways. But younger men like Lawson and former England A prop David Barnes are in to ask questions, pitch new ideas, bridge any gap between players and the committee.Wrecking ball: Ruan Ackermann in action (pic: Martin Flousek)“There are a number of cogs to the machine that gets the Barbarians going,” Lawson explains. “Ultimately the first challenge is getting players – particularly in this window when nobody in the northern hemisphere will release them, although we were lucky to get Ben Franks and Dan Tuohy. With this particular group we had two World Cup winners, some experience, and then a load of hungry youngsters who want to prove themselves, not only to the Barbarians but to the wider world. “The Barbarians must be competitive. When you come into an environment where you have four and a half hours of training to prepare for a Test, how can you do that? By bonding very quickly and the badge and name brings an attitude with it that the players want to do well. When you are against international teams that are settled, preparing for a big campaign or are midway through a series, it’s not easy. It’s important to win or remain competitive, as people will ask where your place is in the game if you don’t.”“There are a number of cogs that get the Barbarians going.”CZECH CAPTAIN Robert Voves is on top of his opponent, raining down punches. At least, he is on the video he is showing Ellis, holding his iPhone in an enormous paw as the scrum-half stares on. Voves is a copper who has previously played professionally as a second-row in France’s ProD2. He claims to be peaceful at heart, despite his job requiring him to sometimes fight “junkies and drunk people”, and he only took up cage fighting to stay fit. He has fought twice and won twice.Ellis is set to go on the Europe2 radio show with Voves, with both men trying to promote the match. Ellis gamely explains rugby to uninitiated hosts Jindra Ekl and Tomas Zastera, two giggling presenters who coyly attempt to draw a haka out of Ellis. The All Black diplomatically steers around questions about women and American Football.Ellis was lucky enough to play in that 2010 Baa-Baas win over the Springboks and he led the side at Wembley, as well as scoring a cracking team try. He reflects on what makes a successful tour.Happy coach: Robbie Deans watches training (Pic: Martin Flousek)“It’s strange – it just sort of clicks,” he says. “Robbie’s been really good in the way he delivers messages. But then it’s the character of the guys. We’ve gone out and had a few beers and everyone’s got on really well, so if you get those good characters it works.“We don’t train a lot. At the kick-off you just hope it works and it always does. You’ve got quality players from around the world who just go and play. The other thing is because it’s still the big stage, and it’s a proud history the Baa-Baas have, no one wants to let themselves down. There’s a lot of personal pride there.”Paddy Ryan picks up the thread: “I haven’t been a part of as many good sides as Andy has, but I’ve been a part of some good ones. You always have the same motivation, to play for the boys around you because you enjoy their company. The biggest tell is in defence. Against South Africa we were pretty good. We leaked 31 points but 21 of those were from set-piece f***-ups.“When you’ve had a whole season to prepare, fitness-wise, you know your body. Something that Michael Cheika says, which I reckon is one of the most profound things he says, is that fitness is being able to make your body comfortable with being uncomfortable. So if you know in your head how to do that, you haven’t forgotten, then you can go out for a few beers and still turn up to play a few days later. You can’t do it year-round but you can do it for a couple of weeks. Sunday night was like our fourth big night out of seven days and it was our best night.”Clean sweep: Michael Fatialofa tidies the ‘sheds’ (pic: Alan Dymock)In the game against the Czechs, there were flashes of true brilliance from winger Melani Nanai and centre Matt Faddes. Rob du Preez of the Stormers kicked points and defended staunchly, while No 8 Ruan Ackermann pancaked attackers. Afterwards, another night was enjoyed. Three days later the Baa-Baas beat Fiji 40-7. It was Fiji’s first game of the autumn window.Many will want stories of high jinks and nights out. With videos regularly flying into the tour WhatsApp group and the rich mystery of how a confiscated turtleneck sweater ended up on live Sky television, there will be vivid memories for players who forged them, forever in black and white. What goes on tour may well stay on tour. But after visiting their 20th international opponent and with many new commercial avenues to be explored, and safe in the knowledge they’ve found the right selection formula, the Baa-Baas will stay on tour too.This feature first appeared in the January 2017 issue of Rugby World magazine. Follow this link to subscribe.last_img read more

Rugby’s Greatest: David Campese

first_img TAGS: The Greatest Players Expand Rugby’s Greatest: David CampeseThe son of a wine-making Italian immigrant, David Campese has managed to upset almost everyone because of his truculence and outspoken views. The game is no worse for that.His distaste for ‘bash and recycle’ rugby is unsurprising when you consider the running skills and devil-may-care attitude with which he burnished the Test stage 101 times. It occasionally left him with egg on his face but 64 Test tries tells its own story. It was a record for a Tier One player for years, until being overtaken by South Africa’s Bryan Habana (67 in 124 Tests).At his best Campese was utterly unstoppable, his weaving in-and-out runs and mesmerising footwork illuminating the final decade of amateurism. He was a mean kicker of a ball too, but above all it was his desire to attack from all areas of the pitch that scared opponents witless.A sight to savour: Campese’s famous goosestep (Getty)Brought up on league in ACT, Campese switched codes and burst into global consciousness during the 1984 European tour that yielded a Wallaby Grand Slam. Irrepressible: David Campese, here scoring v Ireland, bewitched defenders with his mesmerising footwork By RWC 1991 he was at the peak of his powers and two celebrated runs – one arrow-straight, the other mischievously mazy – accounted for the All Blacks on the way to lifting the trophy.He was arguably the first World Cup superstar, because his individual brilliance followed a 1987 New Zealand triumph based more on collective efficiency. “He was allowed the freedom to run at will,” said fellow great Gerald Davies.The onus on increased physical power, as rugby careered towards professionalism, worked against Campese, who was heavier (by 10kg) and slower by the 1995 World Cup. Expand Michael Lynagh is one of the greatest fly-halves… Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Collapse Australia always seem to raise their game for… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Australia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Rugby’s Greatest: Tim Horan Tim Horan is quite possibly the greatest centre… Major clubs: ACT, Padova, Randwick, NSW, MilanCountry: AustraliaTest span: 1982-96Test caps: 101 (100 starts)Test points: 315 (64T, 8C, 7P, 2DG) Rugby’s Greatest: Michael Lynagh In October 1996 he became only the second Test centurion – behind Frenchman Philippe Sella – when facing Italy in Padua, close to where his father was born. The same year he nearly accepted an offer to join Saracens. Rugby’s Greatest: Michael Lynagh He is officially deemed rugby union’s 71st professional player. Yet the tag makes him smile because, long before rugby went open, he played for many years in Italy during off-seasons – and he was certainly well rewarded for his trouble.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Rugby’s Greatest: Tim Horanlast_img read more

Autumn Nations Cup Wales v Georgia Preview

first_img Collapse Expand TAGS: Georgia Get to know Georgia’s Beka Gorgadze The No 8 is fast becoming a crucial… Pivac – “Pre-lockdown you saw where we were heading, post-lockdown you haven’t seen it” pic.twitter.com/Bsu2VtOShF— Russ Petty (@rpetty80) November 16, 2020Of course, to implement that attacking game, they need decent first-phase ball, which was sorely lacking in Dublin as Wales were exposed at scrum time.Wales’ front row for this game – Wyn Jones, Elliot Dee and Samson Lee – have 100 caps between and will be looking to avoid the severe test a young Welsh pack underwent when the two sides last met on Welsh soil. That was in November 2017 and Wales were put under a lot of pressure by Georgia, the hosts holding on for a narrow and unconvincing 13-6 victory.Tight tussle: Wales beat Georgia 13-6 in 2017 (Getty Images)A tight result like that in Llanelli would be a welcome change for Georgia. They have already leaked 40 points to each of Scotland and England this autumn, with their renowned scrum not yet living up to the hype.Georgia have been calling for more opportunities to face top-tier nations and while these experiences are sure to help them going forward, the results make pretty grim reading right now. They will be hoping it’s short-term pain for long-term gain.What’s the big team news?Wayne Pivac has made wholesale changes to the Wales team, with Liam Williams and Justin Tipuric the only players who lined up against Ireland to also start against Georgia.There are three new caps in the starting XV – Johnny William, Kieran Hardy and James Botham (grandson of cricketing great Ian) – as well as another on the bench in Ioan Lloyd. Callum Sheedy makes his first start at fly-half, as does Louis Rees-Zammit on the wing.After the 40-0 defeat by England, Georgia coach Levan Maisashvili has made five changes to the team to play Wales. Sandro Todua and Vasil Lobzhanidze come into the back-line while Jaba Bregvadze, Konstantine Mikautadze and Otar Giorgadze start in the pack.MORE ON THE AUTUMN NATIONS CUP Autumn Nations Cup Fixtures 2020 What have the coaches said?Wales coach Wayne Pivac: “Saturday is a huge opportunity for the players and for us as a squad looking ahead to the future and to RWC 2023. We have said all along that the Autumn Nations Cup is a great platform for us to give opportunities to players, to build depth and experience.” Autumn Nations Cup Fixtures 2020 The Autumn Nations… All you need to know about the Group A match at Parc y Scarlets Autumn Nations Cup Wales v Georgia PreviewOnly 14 months have passed since Wales and Georgia last played each other, but much has changed in that time.Both sides now have new coaches – Wayne Pivac taking over from Warren Gatland in the Wales set-up and Levan Maisashvili succeeding Milton Haig with the Lelos – and there are new faces on the field too.Only a third of the Wales starting XV that beat Georgia 43-14 at last year’s World Cup will also line up at Parc y Scarlets for kick-off on Saturday evening as Pivac looks to use the Autumn Nations Cup to build the depth of his squad for France 2023, while less than half of Georgia’s starters from that 2019 match will play this weekend.And while that victory set Wales on the road to the semi-finals in Japan, more recently they have lost six straight matches – their worst run since 2012-13. Pivac is banking on an exciting, if inexperienced back-line, to bring that losing streak to an end this weekend.One of the more damning statistics from last week’s defeat is that they were in Ireland’s 22 on six occasions and failed to come away with points from any of them, so he is looking to the likes of Callum Sheedy, Nick Tompkins and Louis Rees-Zammit to be clinical in attack against a Georgian team that has suffered heavy defeats by Scotland and England in recent weeks.Earlier in the year, there were glimpses of the creativity Pivac is known for – and that was so evident during his time at the Scarlets – but not so much in the latter part of 2020. Scarlets centre Johnny Williamscenter_img Get to know Georgia’s Beka Gorgadze Georgia coach Levan Maisashvili: “Game management still remains our main issue, which is logical against such strong opposition as England. If we had made correct decisions, we would have scored points as we had one or two good moments during the game. But we failed to grab that moment.“I expect Wales to be more diverse in their attacks than they usually are. We should not let ourselves be misguided by their latest results. They have way more options in attack compared to England and we should expect more surprises in static phases, so we have to think more about defence too.” Over the line: Liam Williams scores against Georgia at RWC 2019 (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Autumn Nations Cup Fixtures 2020 Scarlets centre Johnny Williams Expand Get to know the powerful new addition to… Preparations underway for @autumnnations cup 2020 round two match against #Wales უელსი v საქართველო | 21 ნოემბერი | 21:15 (GMT+4)Cyrchfan: Llanelli. Gwrthwynebwyr: Cymru #AutumnNationsCup #რაგბიჩვენითამაშია #ბორჯღალოსნები pic.twitter.com/CTt2OEoqyR— Georgian Rugby (@GeorgianRugby) November 18, 2020Any interesting statistics?Six of Wales’ starting back-line have been given their first cap by Wayne PivacGeorgia and Wales both recorded a 91% tackle success rate in their opening Autumn Nations Cup matches, the best rate of any nationSince the start of 2018 Johnny McNicholl has racked up more minutes (1,548) on the Parc y Scarlets pitch than any other playerAkaki Tabutsadze has scored five tries for Georgia this year, placing him level with France’s Charles Ollivon as the leading try-scorer in Test rugby in 2020Both Georgia and Wales conceded four scrum penalties in their last matches against England and Ireland respectivelyWhat time does it kick off and is it on TV?Wales v Georgia, Saturday 21 November, Parc y ScarletsThe match kicks off at 5.15pm and will be broadcast live on Amazon Prime Video in the UK and Premier Sports in Ireland, while Welsh language channel S4C will have live coverage too. There is also live match commentary on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra and BBC Sounds.If you’re outside the UK and Ireland, check out our guide to Autumn Nations Cup coverage around the world.Luke Pearce (England) is the referee for this match and has an all-Irish team alongside him. Andrew Brace and Frank Murphy are his assistants, while Joy Neville will make history as the first female Television Match Official in a major men’s competition.What are the line-ups?Wales: Liam Williams; Johnny McNicholl, Nick Tompkins, Johnny Williams, Louis Rees-Zammit; Callum Sheedy, Kieran Hardy; Wyn Jones, Elliot Dee, Samson Lee, Jake Ball, Seb Davies, James Botham, Justin Tipuric (captain), Aaron Wainwright.Replacements: Sam Parry, Nicky Smith, Leon Brown, Cory Hill, James Davies, Rhys Webb, Ioan Lloyd, Jonah Holmes.Georgia: Lasha Khmaladze; Akaki Tabutsadze, Giorgi Kveseladze, Merab Sharikadze (captain), Sandro Todua; Tedo Abzhandadze, Vasil Lobzhanidze; Mikheil Nariashvili, Jaba Bregvadze, Beka Gigashvili, Grigor Kerdikoshvili, Konstantine Mikautadze, Otar Giorgadze, Beka Saginadze, Beka Gorgadze.Replacements: Giorgi Chkoidze, Guram Gogichashvili, Lekso Kaulashvili, Lasha Jaiani, Giorgi Tkhilaishvili, Gela Aprasidze, Deme Tapladze, Tamaz Mchedlidze. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Hotshot: Munster scrum-half Craig Casey

first_imgGet to know the No 9 who has been impressing for the Irish province LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This article originally appeared in the January 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Munster scrum-half Craig CaseyDate of birth 19 April 1999 Born Limerick Position Scrum-half Province Munster Country IrelandWhen did you first play rugby? When I was four, with Shannon RFC. My dad was coaching the club at the time and my uncle was playing for them.What other sports did you play growing up? I played soccer up until U14s at a high level. I also played Gaelic football and a small bit of hurling.What positions have you played? I’ve always really been a scrum-half but underage I played out-half and full-back.Any childhood heroes? Peter Stringer was someone I looked up to. He was the scrum-half for Munster and Ireland, won trophies with both. That’s something I’ve always wanted to emulate.Growing up I also had my uncle, Mossy Lawler, who was playing for Munster. He was always able to give me a helping hand. Then as I got a bit older I started studying a lot of Aaron Smith’s games; he’s someone I try to take a lot from.What age-grade honours do you have? center_img Base man: Craig Casey in Pro14 action for Munster (Getty Images) I was lucky enough to captain Irish U18 Schools and Munster U19, which were great honours. For me, the biggest achievement in age-grade rugby was winning the U20 Six Nations Grand Slam.What are the strengths of your game?I definitely feel my points of difference are my passing and my competitiveness. I hate losing in absolutely anything.And work-ons? I’m looking to improve everything. Key focus points for me are developing my kicking in all aspects.Who has been the biggest influence on your career? My father. He coached me up until U15 with Shannon, then went on to coach me in schools rugby. He’s played a huge role in my development. Even now he’s a great person to be able to have conversations with, where he can give me honest feedback on games.What are your goals for 2021? I’ve always wanted to get to the highest level. I definitely want to win trophies with Munster. I’d love to be involved in Irish camps, get a few caps and see where that takes me.RW Verdict: Casey has been in the Munster system since he was 16. He may not be the biggest – 5ft 5in and a little under 12st – but he excels at the basics. He provides plenty of tempo, is getting game time at Munster and could be Ireland’s next-generation nine.last_img read more

Six Nations Television Audience

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. As Pougatch said in the wake of Scotland’s seismic Calcutta Cup victory: “Huge figures for England-Scotland 6 Nations Rugby (on ITV), a peak of 8.4 million. BBC have Wales-Ireland today, (ITV) showing racing from Leopardstown & Channel 4 England’s cricket in India. The demand & more importantly reach of sport on free-to-air is undoubtedly massive.”The Scottish arm of the broadcaster also had this to say, below. Describing it as record numbers, their graphic says: “Scotland’s victory over England was the best watched match ever on STV – with a share of 52% and a peak audience of 1.2m.”As it stands there is a lot of uncertainty over the next television deal for the Six Nations, following this year. The whole sport is waiting to see if the next deal will keep the tournament on free-to-air, or will go onto a streaming platform, as the Autumn Nations Cup did with Amazon Prime.Before the tournament started, Six Nations CEO Ben Morel said of considerations in future deals: “Reaching out to new audiences, whether globally or in our domestic market, and younger audiences is a key way (to aid growth) and improve our overall game presentation.“The women’s game is also a big focus and there is a lot of growth on the women’s game either. It is that combination of bringing in more expertise, focusing on innovation and putting the women’s game as a standalone pillar of our growth will enable us to deliver.” French TV registers a bump in viewer numbers Teddy Thomas and Gael Fickou celebrate (Getty Images) Six Nations Television AudienceIn the second week of the Six Nations, reports in France noted a bump in number of television viewers there for les Bleus Test match against Ireland. According to reports, Sunday’s broadcast on France 2 attracted an average of 5.86 million viewers for 37.3% of audience share – the best television audience for a Six Nations match since 2014.During the first round of the Six Nations, when France defeated Italy, it was reported that the broadcast delivered  an average of 4.11 million viewers on France 2, too.Related: France win in Dublin for first time since 2011There were also some eye-catching numbers on viewing figures coming out of the first round of the Six Nations. Check out this tweet from ITV presenter Mark Pougatch.last_img read more

Episcopal clergy arrested after entering Trinity Church property

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. December 19, 2011 at 3:15 pm I’m sorry, but where in the Bible does it say Jesus led mobs in ransacking the homes of the Pharisees or in stealing the offerings from the Temple? The Jews of His time were looking for a Messiah just like the one you’re describing and they were so disappointed that Jesus wasn’t the one leading them to “climb those fences” that they crucified Him. Of course, this doesn’t really matter for Episcopalians any more as the Bible is merely an historical document about which they’re occasionally embarrassed when it doesn’t happen to agree with their ideas of “social justice.” Suzanne Smith says: John D. Andrews says: Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Brian Smith says: December 18, 2011 at 4:41 pm Convincing someone of what is in front of them? Dust your sandals off and move on. Haven’t you been listening to who owns the ballot boxes? Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs December 18, 2011 at 4:02 pm This is a remarkably accurate statement of an extraordinarily fluid situation. Thank you for writing with such objectivity and so much nuance. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Jess Parmer says: Stan Chaz says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ January 3, 2012 at 7:50 pm I thought that the Bishop was wearing a purple cassock, rather than a purple robe? December 19, 2011 at 1:28 am You don’t need to be religious to understand -and embrace- the idea that “Whatsoever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.” But the 1%, in their blind greed and schemes, have forgotten and closed their eyes to what the word “society” should really mean. Because of Occupy Wall Street, we are finally talking less about CUTS and more about BLEEDING. Instead of demanding m-o-r-e budget cuts -to be borne by the middle class and poor- we are FINALLY focusing on the shameful bleeding that the poor and middle class has endured for all too long. Instead of talking about even m-o-r-e cuts in the taxes of millionaires….we are now talking about fairness and justice – about an economy and a political system that is increasingly run for the rich, and by the rich. Instead of talking about LESS government, we are talking about a government that WORKS FOR ALL OF US, not just a favored few. Thank you OWS, for reminding us that people -ordinary working people- really DO matter, and for helping open our eyes to what’s really going on in this country. Trinity Church should look deep into its collective soul, and at its ultimate mission. It should do the right thing, and help OWS. For I would bet my life, that if He were physically with us today…as He was 2000 years ago, He himself would be among the FIRST to climb those fences, and occupy Trinity’s Duarte Square. Of this I am certain. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Jess Parmer says: December 18, 2011 at 2:29 pm The most “amazing” thing in this article is that Ms. Packard has been reduced to a mouthpiece for an organization who’s interpretation of justice is not representative of the Spirit. The spirit blowing forcefully into Ms. Packard’s life is one of poor judgement and political evil. If Ms. Packard and others like her want a political movement, which is what this is, then take it to the polls, as Bishop Tutu suggests, and let the people decide what to do with it. I am not at all convinced that this movement is anything other than a quest for power and confiscation. So OWS wins, what then? Who decides what is just, this group? Show us, please Ms. Packard, a single place in the world where such movements have not lead to murder, oppression and an eventual accumulation of wealth by the people who control the movement. Then, please convince me that this movement is different. December 19, 2011 at 12:51 pm Tsk, tsk,tsk…name calling and demonizing Wild Wiley. Now go and wash your mouth out with soap. Per your sainted mother. December 19, 2011 at 9:22 pm I am grateful to Bishop Packard, Rev. Merz, and Rev. Sniffen for saving our Church from shame this weekend. There are many compelling reasons for our Church to join with OWS. I offer my opinion in depth, here: http://www.episcopalcafe.com/daily/parishes/occupy_wall_street_and_the_epi.php Rector Knoxville, TN December 20, 2011 at 12:38 pm This is a remarkable time, with very challenging situations. It is important for me to be still and see if this is of God, then it will transform our lives, if not it will be a flash in the pan of news notes.If the injustices of financial and political activity is exposed and confronted than “thanks be to God’. If individual egos are simply being fed, then they will discover the struggles of such a path.This is a time to be prayerful, to be open to the working of the Holy Spirit and to listen to all the various voices, perhaps we will be converted again to a deeper faith and love. J. H. Shumaker says: December 18, 2011 at 7:06 pm Bravo to the Packards, the Bishop and the Bishopress (as our Global South friends would say down Desmond Tutu way)…it´s true, the spirit is blowing and it won´t blow the integrity of fellow human beings down–as for the oppressors, you´re on your own (which is probably your favorite position anyway) the battle has been won but not the war chest that you adore. Peter Jenks says: December 20, 2011 at 1:28 pm Seizing privately owned property is a Marxist ideal. Seizing privately owned church property is even better. What really takes the cake here is the idea that the protestors are entitled to somebody else’s property by virtue of their moral superiority over the lawful owners. Vladimir Lenin would be so proud! Suzanne Smith says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Occupy Movement Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Dr. Gene Bourquin says: December 19, 2011 at 3:39 pm What an embarrassment for Trinity Wall Street (which is ridiculously rich anyway) and shame on our Presiding Bishop – to be on the side of corporate greed and “art” and respectability – at the expense of the marginalized and those whose lives have been upended during this financial crisis. Thank God for the Packards! They are true voices of faith and love in our church. Maybe it is time for mainstream churches like ECUSA to fade away. We’ve become too respectable and lost touch with the Gospels and Jesus’ radical message of love and charity. Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Wiley Kendrick says: center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA December 18, 2011 at 4:48 pm I hope Ms. Packard will forgive me for speaking up for her in reply to Kendrick, who misuses rhetorical flourish in several attempts here to deprive any who answer of a voice either rational or historical. The one example is: the American Revolution. True enough, it led to slavery’s institutionalization for roughly ninety years after the Constitution was adopted, but that ended in abolition, didn’t it? Ms. Packard feels the Spirit blowing over the shoulders of riot-geared, jack-booted, and faceless “liberators” of a trivial piece of property, as they sling her body around. Does Kendrick suggest she misread this wind? Look at Kendrick’s name calling: she is a “mouthpiece;” she is associated with “poor judgement and political evil” without the slightest effort of proof. Such rhetorical dust has already settled for me: It is Kendrick who must answer for the baseless falsehoods implied in this diatribe. Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS January 9, 2012 at 8:19 pm From the first the Church’s response to the Good News of Christ was communal-in your terms, Marxist. Check out Acts 4:32 to 5:11. Lenin was not opposed to the values and ethics found in the Gospels, he was opposed to the oppression of human beings. There are two additions in the new Church Calander that you might want to check out. They are celebrated on October 8th-William Dwight Porter Bliss and Richard Theodore Ely. They believed that the Church was to call for economic justice and that the Gospels supported that goal. The wrote and preached against economic oppression in the United States 100 years ago. Perhaps Trinity Episcopal Church should have a Bible Study centered around the call for economic justice in the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures and read the essays and sermons of these men before they side with those who oppress others for personal gain. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Rev. P Joshua Griffin says: January 7, 2012 at 8:32 pm How off-topic can you get? Who climbed the fence first?–an Episcopal bishop. What mobs were there ransacking homes or stealing?–none. You seem to assume the Zealots and other radicals crucified Jesus–a proposition that you must prove, though I doubt you’ll find much evidence. The Bible IS an historical document, and we are all better off for seeing it that way, so that our social justice can be grafted onto it. Remember, it was only about 1.5 centuries ago that the Bible used in your sense was also used to justify slavery. Time to take off the biblical inerrancy blinders and use the perfectly good brain God gave you. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET December 18, 2011 at 9:27 pm To speak against the Packards is to speak against history. We celebrate Desmond Tutu for his civil disobedience. We celebrate Martin Luther King for his civil disobedience. We celebrate those who took part in the Arab Spring. But, when it happens in our own church some speak against it. To me that is being a hypocrite. Too many Episcopal churches have become settled churches, perhaps TEC has too. They have become comfortable and do not want to be bothered with discerning God’s Spirit, acting in concert with what the Spirit is doing in the world. Too many see piety as the goal instead of working with the Holy Spirit to bring justice to the world. Trinity Wall Street and TEC had an opportunity to work for justice in this very public arena; they chose not to. People, especially young people, are looking for churches that practice authentic Christianity. Rightly or wrongly they will most likely form the opinion that Episcopalians do not practice authentic Christianity, but are hypocrites. December 18, 2011 at 4:38 pm Blessings to Ms. Packard. Social justice is our work. Respectfully, I do not think there is a ‘win’ or lose for OWS. It’s the message more than the messenger; there is no doubt of the growing inequities in our country. Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Donna Schaper says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anne Beal says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Charles W. Daily, Jr. says: Episcopal clergy arrested after entering Trinity Church property TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (18) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Elaine Jenkins says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tom Haven says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Sharon SheridanPosted Dec 18, 2011 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY December 19, 2011 at 3:49 pm Beautifully articulated. Retired Episcopal bishop George E. Packard (purple robe) and other protesters affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement are detained after climbing a ladder to trespass on a privately-owned piece of land near Juan Pablo Duarte Square during a march in New York December 17, 2011. Hundreds of anti-Wall Street protesters took to the New York streets on Saturday in an attempt to establish a new encampment, with a number arrested as they tried to move onto land owned by Trinity Church, Wall Street. Photo/REUTERS/Andrew Burton[Episcopal News Service] Retired Episcopal Bishop George Packard and at least two other Episcopal priests were arrested Dec. 17 after they entered a fenced property — owned by Trinity Episcopal Church, Wall Street — in Duarte Square in Lower Manhattan as part of Occupy Wall Street‘s “D17 Take Back the Commons” event to celebrate three months since the movement’s launch.Bishop George Packard climbs over a fence surrounding the Duarte Square property in lower Manhattan owned by Trinity Wall Street in a Dec. 17 effort to open the area to Occupy Wall Street protesters. Photo/REUTERS/Andrew BurtonLivestream video showed the former Episcopal bishop for the armed forces and federal ministries, dressed in a purple robe and wearing a cross, climbing a ladder that protesters erected against the fence at about 3:30 p.m. and dropping to the ground inside the property. Packard was the first to enter the site. Other protesters followed, including the Rev. John Merz and the Rev. Michael Sniffen, Episcopal priests in the Diocese of Long Island.Soon after, police entered the area and arrested at least 50 people. Merz reportedly was arrested with Packard. Sniffen was conducting a telephone interview with ENS that ended abruptly. At 11 p.m., he confirmed that he subsequently had been arrested. Just before midnight, Packard’s wife, Brook, told ENS via e-mail that her husband had been released and was on his way home.OWS had been lobbying Trinity to use the property for a winter encampment, following the movement’s Nov. 15 eviction from Zuccotti Park near the church. Trinity had refused, citing a lack of facilities at the site and its lease agreement allowing the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council to use it for periodic art installations. Packard had been trying to mediate an agreement between OWS members and Trinity.“Trinity Wall Street would not meet with Occupy Wall Street. They refused,” said Brook Packard in a telephone interview shortly after 7 p.m. Dec. 17. “When Trinity closed its ears and refused to negotiate, the path of civil disobedience was clear.”On Dec. 17, OWS had invited protesters to attend a “Block Party and Re-Occupation” at Sixth Avenue and Canal Street, site of the Trinity-owned property near the Holland Tunnel, beginning at noon. The event was scheduled to include on-site entertainment plus performances broadcast by WBAI radio: “From the airwaves to the subterranean let us assemble once again to say we’re here to liberate space and we’re not going away.”Sniffen told ENS he entered the park with Packard and other Episcopal and interfaith clergy. Over the phone, the sounds of people singing “Lo, how a rose e’er blooming” could be heard in the background.Sniffen said he was concerned about getting arrested and didn’t know until the last moment whether he would enter the fenced area.“As a matter of conscience and discernment, I felt that I had to enter … in solidarity with these people who I’ve been supporting from the beginning and who are taking an enormous risk to force a conversation to happen about social and economic justice,” he said. “As a priest of all the people, I felt that it was important to be with the people rather than looking at them through the fence as they take this great risk.”A moment later, he reported, “There are a lot of people exiting the park” and then, “I’ve got to go.”Livestream video of one portion of the fence showed protesters pushing it inward and police officers pushing it outward. Cameraman Tim Pool reported that police pushed their clubs through the fence to move protesters away.“The people outside the fence who were not breaking the law were in much more danger than the people inside. I thought I was going to lose my life,” said Brook Packard, who also described her experience on her husband’s blog. “We were sitting outside the fence. The cops came, and they started pushing the fence down on us and pushing the people that were standing.”“A cop looked me in the eye and kneed me in the chest,” she said. She asked him to stop and “he kneed me two more times. I was pushed to the ground, and then I was picked up and thrown on top of other people.”“I was not alone,” she added. “That’s nothing compared to what the protesters have encountered in terms of violence as they try and get this movement moving.”Inspired by the Arab Spring demonstrations that sparked political change in the Middle East, the Occupy movement protesting greed and economic inequality has spread to more than 2,500 locations across the country and the world. Officials in many cities have dismantled encampments, including New York’s original site at Zuccotti Park. At an Advent event in New York on Dec. 3, at which Packard delivered the invocation, an OWS member named Laura read a “proposed national call to reoccupy” on Dec. 17.“We call on displaced occupations across the nation to reoccupy outdoor places,” she said.Said Brook Packard, “There are two things that can kill this movement: violence and not having a home. And they need a home.”Members of an OWS working group she attended discussed how, in seeking to use Trinity’s property, “they didn’t want to make it against religion or people of faith” and wanted to make it clear that “the end goal was not to occupy this area,” she said. “The end result was to get a home, so that from there they could occupy foreclosed homes for homeless people instead of banks” and take other actions.Faith leaders have differed on whether Trinity – which has allowed use of other facilities for OWS meeting space and respite – should permit an encampment on the Duarte Square site and whether protesters should “occupy” the space without permission.The Rev. Michael Ellick of Judson Memorial Church, one of the leaders in an interfaith group supporting OWS, wrote in an e-mailed notice to supporters Dec. 16: “Occupy Faith NYC has always supported the OWS ask of Trinity, and will continue to do so, but there is no clear consensus on actions like civil disobedience. Without this consensus, we will not be endorsing such actions, and individual faith leaders who may choose to go this route will be doing so autonomously. That said, I encourage all of you to join us tomorrow for this event.”Also on Dec. 16, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Episcopal Diocese of New York Bishop Mark Sisk each issued statements criticizing OWS attempts to occupy the Trinity property without permission.“The Trinity congregation has decided that the property known as Duarte Park is not appropriate for use by the Occupy movement, and that property remains closed,” Jefferts Schori wrote. “Other facilities of Trinity continue to be open to support the Occupy movement, for which I give great thanks. It is regrettable that Occupy members feel it necessary to provoke potential legal and police action by attempting to trespass on other parish property.”Retired South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu issued two statements. The first praised OWS members as “a voice for the world.”“Trinity Church is an esteemed and valued old friend of mine … That is why it is especially painful for me to hear of the impasse you are experiencing with the parish. I appeal to them to find a way to help you,” he said.The second statement discouraged attempts to occupy the property. “My statement is not to be used to justify breaking the law,” Tutu said. “In a country where all people can vote and Trinity’s door to dialogue is open, it is not necessary to forcibly break into property. Nor is it to reinforce or build higher the barriers between people of faith who seek peace and justice. My deep prayer is that people can work together and I look forward to that conversation.”Brook Packard, however, said Trinity, despite repeated OWS requests, had not been willing to dialogue directly with OWS members beyond a recent meeting with hunger strikers seeking to get Trinity to permit OWS use of the property.“The real story is, why did Trinity not engage in dialogue?” she asked. “Trinity more than anyone should know its own history, particularly with its support of Desmond Tutu, that laws must be broken in order for justice to reign.”In a Dec. 17 statement, Trinity’s rector, the Rev. James Cooper, said the church was “saddened that OWS protestors chose to ignore yesterday’s messages” from Jefferts Schori, Tutu and Sisk.“OWS protestors call out for social and economic justice; Trinity has been supporting these goals for more than 300 years,” he wrote. “The protestors say they want to improve housing and economic development; Trinity is actively engaged in such efforts in the poorest neighborhoods in New York City and indeed around the world. We do not, however, believe that erecting a tent city at Duarte Square enhances their mission or ours. The vacant lot has no facilities to sustain a winter encampment. In good conscience and faith, we strongly believe to do so would be wrong, unsafe, unhealthy and potentially injurious. We will continue to provide places of refuge and the responsible use of our facilities in the Wall Street area.”After the arrests at Duarte Square, OWS participants began another march. Videographer Pool reported they were headed toward Cooper’s home, but police blocked the street. Marchers then took to the streets, snarling evening traffic on Seventh Avenue and, after temporarily being blocked by police, walking to Times Square.Before attending the Dec. 17 event, Brook Packard said, “We had agreed that [George] would be arrested and I would be home.”“After that really terrifying moment of having the fence crush me and having the police throwing me around,” she said, she was able to walk to another location and sang a song to let her husband know she was there. He later called her from the police “paddy wagon.”Reflecting on the OWS participants, she said, “We love these people. They are remarkable. They have been misrepresented in the media. They are young and vital and brilliant. There are some hangers-on, but that happens.”“This is the wind of the Spirit blowing forcefully into our lives,” she said. “This could have been an amazing opportunity for Trinity and an amazing moment for the entire church, but they chose private property over people and principles.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Leonardo Ricardo says: Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more

Churches worldwide observe week of prayer for unity

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. [Ecumenical News International] Churches around the world observed a week of prayer from Jan. 18-25, holding special worship services and gatherings that emphasized what Christians hold in common.This year’s Week of Prayer for Christian Unity centered on the scriptural theme, “We will all be changed by the victory of our Lord Jesus Christ,” from the book of Corinthians (15:51-58). Celebrated in some areas at Pentecost, the week is sponsored by the Catholic church’s Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and the Geneva-based World Council of Churches (WCC).Materials for celebration and reflection this year were prepared by churches in Poland, sharing their history of partition and victory over oppression, the WCC said in a news release.In the Philippines, where people have been faced with governance crisis, churches took the lead towards national unity in setting aside their doctrinal differences. Together they marked the week by praying for change and peace.Churches Together in Britain and Ireland stressed the significance of change as an integral part of theology and unity among the churches. “Change is also at the heart of the ecumenical movement. When we pray for the unity of the church we are praying that the churches that we know, and which are so familiar to us, will change as they conform more closely to Christ,” they said.Celebrations also took place in France and Switzerland, and throughout Europe, where various churches, including Orthodox, Roman Catholics and Protestants, reflected together on the theme of Christian unity in prayer and meditations, the WCC said.Across the U.S. and Canada, local Christian communities marked the week with special worship services and community gatherings.According to the Rev. Victor Kim from Grace Presbyterian Church in Calgary, Alberta, “it’s a week that is ecumenical in nature. So it’s not about one particular denomination, one particular strand.”However, in Lahore, Pakistan, a gathering on Jan. 23 of Catholic and Protestant leaders that marked the week of prayer said that unity is being threatened by unconsecrated, “unofficial” churches, according to CathNews India, a Catholic news service.“Self-made pastors and bishops are a serious concern,” said Father James Channan, regional coordinator for the United Religious Initiative. “Without a parish or even church buildings [in some cases], such people attract the poor. This unconsecrated form of preaching usually results in confusion, scandal and controversy,” Channan said, according to CathNews India.Both Catholic and Protestant speakers pressed for joint meetings between the recognized churches to deal with problems arising from the threats posed by terrorism, violence and depression.Meanwhile, in Geneva, Tamara Grdzelidze, program executive of the WCC Commission on Faith and Order, offered various perspectives showing the strength of faith as one uniting factor.In a special service for the week on Jan. 23 at the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva, Grdzelidze said that in Christianity, “defeat changes into victory, the Crucifixion changes into the Resurrection, death … changes into life.”Grdzelidze said that “to follow the Lord, to serve Him and attain the honor of victory over death, we are called to unity in our faith in its manifold expressions whether charitable, prayerful, meditative, active or pro-active. Unity in faith is indeed victory over hatred, wickedness, idle talk, sloth.” In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Anglican Communion, Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 3, 2012 at 12:36 pm UNITY in the Anglican Communion should be much more than prayers … for at present disunity seems to be the on-going concern … be it in the acceptance of a COVENANT, the overt actions against biblical moral teachings or the individual churches’ power structures over matters of faith, tradition, revelations and/or practices. If the trends continue, there might be many Anglican Communions or none at all. The Christian Faith and Practices of PECUSA and other national churches/missions around the world could become so multifaceted and multidysfunctional that the so-called BODY OF CHRIST might just be a multivaried collection of unrecognizable and dispersed body parts … LET US PRAY AND ACT FIRST FOR UNITY WITHIN OURSELVES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ecumenical & Interreligious By ENInews StaffPosted Jan 26, 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service R. A. Garcia says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Comments (1) Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Churches worldwide observe week of prayer for unitylast_img read more

Program, Budget and Finance issues statement on budget completion

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Posted Jul 9, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The following statement has been issued by the members of the Episcopal Church Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance, on July 9 at the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church.The Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance completed its work on the proposed 2013-15 budget on Monday morning, July 9, at 9 a.m. PB&F reviewed the final copy of the budget spreadsheet and adopted it for presentation to the 77th General Convention. The budget is being translated into Spanish and will be forwarded to the printer on Monday afternoon.The schedule of the General Convention precluded receiving more than a few concurred resolutions from the two Houses. However, PB&F believes that it has listened hard to the church, both before General Convention and here in Indianapolis, and is pleased that the budget includes many of the requests for continuing support and for new work.The proposed budget is structured according to the Five Marks of Mission and based on a 19% asking for each year of the 2013-15 Triennium. The proposed budget will be presented to a Joint Session of the General Convention at 2:15 p.m. on Tuesday, July 10.Diane Pollard, Diocese of New York, Chair of Program, Budget and Finance, and Bishop Stephen Lane, Diocese of Maine, vice chair, on behalf of the members of Program, Budget and Finance. Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY General Convention, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI General Convention 2012, Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Program Budget & Finance Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Program, Budget and Finance issues statement on budget completion Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more