Daniel Ellsberg on WikiLeaks

first_imgNews Help by sharing this information Organisation Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked Pentagon Papers, defends WikiLeaks center_img January 31, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Daniel Ellsberg on WikiLeaks RSF_en last_img

Parliament cancels creation of information ombudsman

first_img June 4, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders has strongly condemned a parliamentary vote on 21 December that overwhelmingly overturned a plan to create an ombudsman for news and information.With just one dissenting vote, parliament amended its constitutional law, adopted in 2005 on the advice of the Council of Europe, with the effect of cancelling the creation of both an ombudsman and of an institution with the role of addressing issues relating to public access to information.As a result of neither of them seeing the light of day, the job will go to an existing mediator, responsible for protecting the rights of citizens, Elmira Suleymanova. The amendments, examined by the parliamentary committee for legislative policy, state construction and human rights were initiated by President Ilham Aliyev. The Azerbaijan authorities therefore flew in the face of the Council of Europe’s recommendations. The amendments will reduce the Azerbaijan people’s right of access to information, the worldwide press freedom organisation said. The turnaround on the part of the authorities also represents a serious backward step in the protection of the rights of media and journalists that are already largely being flouted. They simply abolish the body responsible for mediating between journalists and the authorities, to avoid resort to the courts, as recommended by the Council of Europe. This means that current ombudswoman, Elmira Suleymanova, will have to defend both the rights of citizens and the rights of journalists. Some members of parliament pointed out that this expansion of her powers could complicate her already heavy workload, or more seriously still destroy the spirit of the 2005 law, turning it into an empty shell. The detractors of the information ombudsman argued that its creation could mean splitting up the roles of the different ombudsman. Elmira Suleymanova illustrated this point with the example of Sweden which originally had nine ombudsmen but now has no more than four. Such a mandate however appears to be too important to be filled by a single person. All the more so since the question of the rights of citizens is very different from that of access to information and the rights of journalists.Moreover, the current ombudswoman has pro-government leanings, which is incompatible with the Council of Europe recommendations. These call on member states to ensure that the ombudsman has complete independence, sufficient financial means and equipment, access to information required for the job, presentation of an annual progress report to parliament, and as far as possible for his or her decisions to be applied. As in any constitutional law, the application of the amendment will require a second vote in six months time. Reporters Without Borders urges the Council of Europe and member governments to call on Azerbaijani members of parliament to vote against it. Follow the news on Azerbaijan News Receive email alerts Russian peacekeepers deny foreign reporters access to Nagorno-Karabakh News AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia News Organisation center_img “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says June 8, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information RSF_en News RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan to go further January 10, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Parliament cancels creation of information ombudsman April 9, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Limerick’s Ava in tune for YADA songwriting award

first_imgNewsLocal NewsLimerick’s Ava in tune for YADA songwriting awardBy Liam Togher – November 13, 2014 803 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Print Facebook Advertisement Twitter WhatsApp Linkedin Previous articleLimerick man reaches ‘Ireland’s Best Young Entrepreneur’ National FinalNext articleRathkeale gets green light for EU funding Liam Togherhttp://www.limerickpost.ieLiam joined the Limerick Post in December 2012, having previously worked in other local media organisations. He holds an MA in Journalism from the University of Limerick and is particularly interested in sports writing. TAGS1964Ava BarettawardGaelcholaiste LuimnighmusicsongwritingYADAYoung Artist Development Awards center_img Limerick Post Show | Dora Gola Limerick Post Show | Into The Stream | Emma Langford Email Limerick Post Show | Raging Sons release Someone Else’s Love A LIMERICK student took home a coveted songwriting award at the Young Artist Development Awards (YADA) at the Lyrath Estate Hotel in Kilkenny.Sixteen year-old Ava Barett who attends Gaelcholáiste Luimnigh, won the award and a €25,000 prize for her song ‘1964’, which will now be recorded as a single in a professional recording studio.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Ava, who has been writing songs since she was “able to speak”, was overwhelmed to have won the prize and she is eagerly awaiting the opportunity to practice her childhood passion on a grander scale.She said: “It means so much to me because it means that I can show what I have been doing and show my passion to the people of Ireland. That means a huge amount to me.“I play once a year usually in my school’s talent show and that’s just for the craic. It’s not to win. It’s always been to show my thoughts on the world.“I’m not trying to be famous. I’m just trying to show my view of the world. The writing of the lyrics is probably the most important part for me but forming it is the next most important thing.”Ava’s gift for songwriting was borne out of singing stories to the tune of Twinkle Twinkle Little Star in her infant years, although she admitted that when she began writing songs, she did not intend to be the person performing them.That changed when she was in fifth class in primary school, when she was inspired by a friend who “had the best voice that I had ever heard” to learn guitar and, subsequently, add chords to the lyrics she had written.Ava explained that she has gone on to learn several other instruments, saying: “I took up banjolele and ukulele and I started playing with different instruments that are quite small.“I like to have small instruments to make different sounds that I might not have heard before. My mother calls my music ‘toytown pop’ because I use toybox toys to make music.”The YADAs are a creative and educational initiative run by the Young Artists Association of Ireland, a not-for-profit organisation established to provide an industry-safe environment for aspiring young artists.The awards were hosted by RTÉ presenters Stephen Byrne and Diana Bunici, with the judging panel including music producer Ray Traynor, singer/songwriter Oisin Kavanagh  and songwriter Don Mescall. Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Limerick Post Show | Niamh talks Limerick Limerick Post Show | Defying Gravity – A Musical Celebration of Womenlast_img read more

Coronavirus updates: US reports over 41,500 new COVID-19 cases in a day

first_imgMyriam Borzee/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 504,000 people worldwide.Over 10.2 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks. Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 2.5 million diagnosed cases and at least 126,141 deaths. Here’s how the news is developing Tuesday. All times Eastern:8:06 a.m.: Over 100 cases linked to a single bar in MichiganAt least 107 new cases of COVID-19 have been linked to a bar in East Lansing, Michigan, officials said. The Ingham County Health Department is asking anyone who went to Harper’s Restaurant & Brew Pub between June 12 and June 20 to quarantine themselves for 14 days since their visit and watch for symptoms. The infected individuals are between the ages of 16 and 28, and none have been hospitalized so far. Most of the cases have had mild symptoms, with 28 people having no symptoms at all. At least 40% are Michigan State University students or recent graduates, officials said. Just 12 of the cases are from secondary transmission, meaning people who were in contact with a primary case but did not go to the bar themselves, officials said. In a statement posted to Facebook last week, Harper’s Restaurant & Brew Pub announced that it has decided to close temporarily to implement a program to eliminate lines and to install air purifying technology. The bar said it had reopened at 50% capacity on June 8, according to the governor’s executive order. “We have experienced long lines on the public sidewalk in front of our building,” the business wrote in the June 22 post. “We have attempted to instruct customers waiting in line to wear face coverings and practice social distancing through signage on the public sidewalk and with a banner on our railing. Our oversight of the line on our stairs has been successful, but trying to get customers to follow our recommendations on the public sidewalk has been challenging.” The growing cluster of cases has prompted Ingham County officials to issue an emergency order reducing restaurant capacity to 50% or no more than 75 people, whichever is less. Restaurant capacity was already restricted to 50% of normal seating, but there was no limitation on the number of patrons. “Large crowds are difficult to control,” Ingham County health officer Linda Vail said in a statement Monday night. “By allowing no more than 75 people, restaurants and bars will be better able to enforce social distancing and the use of masks and face coverings. I strongly encourage all bars and restaurants to strictly enforce safety measures and to do all they can to help stop the spread of coronavirus in our community.” 7:25 a.m.: ‘The minute we opened, it was like COVID didn’t exist,’ Miami mayor saysSince Miami began reopening in late May, Mayor Francis Suarez said he’s seen people acting as though the coronavirus pandemic never happened. “The minute that we opened, it was like COVID didn’t exist and people just forgot and, in some cases, are still forgetting,” Suarez told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview Tuesday on Good Morning America.“You know, the city of Miami was actually the last city in the entire state of Florida to open,” he added. “I got criticized at the time for taking too long, some said.”Miami is now the hardest hit city in Florida’s novel coronavirus outbreak as cases spike across the Sunshine State. The mayor said his office is doing everything they can to control the spread of the virus. “People are congregating, they’re having a good time, they’re partying and they’re spreading the disease incredibly efficiently, and it’s starting to stress our hospital system,” Suarez said. Miami and a handful of other cities in Miami-Dade County have now made it mandatory for people to wear face masks in public at all times, which Suarez called “a no-brainer.” Miami has also implemented fines for those who don’t follow the rule. Meanwhile, businesses that are found not following coronavirus protocols will be shut down for 10 days on the first occurrence, 15 days on the second occurrence and 30 days on the third occurrence. “They’re upset that we’re implementing some of these rules, but we’re trying to do that in a surgical way so that we don’t have to undo some of the openings that we’ve done,” Suarez said. “We’re doing it also so that we don’t have to reimplement a stay-at-home order, which was extremely effective in March and early April but it also crippled our economy.”6:28 a.m.: Arizona hospitals are on the brinkHospitals in Arizona are reaching capacity amid a surge in coronavirus cases, according an internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.The memo, obtained by ABC News, states that both Flagstaff Medical Center and Little Colorado Medical Center have had zero “medical-surge availability” since June 24. Patients are being directed to hospitals in Yavapai and Maricopa counties, according to the memo.Coronavirus-related hospitalizations across Arizona have nearly doubled in the past two weeks, while intensive care units are at 88% capacity.The number of COVID-19 cases in Arizona has jumped from 13,000 on May 15 to 74,500 on Monday, while the statewide death toll has nearly doubled in the last six weeks. More than 1,500 people in the Grand Canyon State have died from COVID-19.5:24 a.m.: Australia to reimpose lockdown on Melbourne suburbsAustralian officials will reimpose lockdown restrictions on a number of suburbs around Melbourne, as the country’s second-largest city grapples with a spike in coronavirus infections.Beginning at 11:59 p.m. local time on July 1, a stay-at-home order will take effect in 10 postal codes in the Melbourne area that have been identified as community transmission hotspots for the novel coronavirus. The lockdown will remain in place at least until July 29, according to a statement Tuesday from Daniel Andrews, premier of the southeastern Australian state of Victoria.“I know this will be terribly disruptive and difficult but if everyone sticks to the rules and we see transmission come down, then in four weeks the restrictions can lift,” Andrews said.Residents of the affected postal codes will only be allowed to leave their homes to shop for food and supplies, to seek and provide care, to exercise, and to study or go to work — if they can’t do so from home. Businesses and facilities in those areas that have recently reopened, including beauty salons, gyms, libraries and swimming pools, will once again be restricted. Cafes and restaurants will again only be open for take-away and delivery service, Andrews said.“Very clearly, this is not where we wanted to be,” he added. “I understand people are tired. We’re all frustrated. We all just want things to go back to how they once were. And the sooner we all do the right thing, the sooner we can beat this.”Just under 8,000 people in Australia have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and at least 104 of them have died, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.4:42 a.m.: WHO to send team to China to investigate COVID-19 originThe World Health Organization is sending a team to China to investigate the origins of the novel coronavirus.“We can fight the virus better when we know everything about the virus, including how it started,” WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said during Monday’s press briefing in Geneva.The very first cases of COVID-19 were identified in the Chinese city of Wuhan last December, months before the rapidly spreading outbreak was declared a pandemic.Tedros said the investigative team will travel there next week.“We hope that will lead into understanding how the virus started and what we can do for the future to prepare,” he added.3:32 a.m.: US reports more than 41,500 new casesMore than 41,500 new cases of COVID-19 were identified in the United States on Monday, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.The latest daily caseload is up from the previous day, but still lower than the country’s record high of more than 45,000 new cases identified last Friday.The national total currently stands at 2,590,582 diagnosed cases with at least 126,141 deaths.The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.By May 20, all states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up to over 30,000 and then crossing 40,000 last week.Nearly half of all 50 states have seen a rise in infections in recent weeks, with some — such as Florida, South Carolina and Georgia — reporting daily records. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more