Seattles Brandon Browner Suspended Indefinitely For Drug Use

Photo by The Associated Press.Seattle Seahawks cornerback Brandon Browner was suspended indefinitely by the NFL on Wednesday for violating the league’s substance abuse policy.The suspension is the second in two seasons for Browner. He was suspended four games last season for violating the league’s policy on performance-enhancing substances. He’s the second Seahawks player to be suspended for violating the substance abuse policy this season. Fellow cornerback Walter Thurmond is serving the final week of a four-game suspension.Browner, whose suspension is effective immediately and without pay, sent out a lengthy statement vowing that he would continue to fight his suspension. But he appeared resigned that his career with the Seahawks was over.“I want to thank the Seahawks organization for the incredible opportunity they gave me when they took a chance on a player who was out of the NFL and playing in the CFL for 4 years,” Browner wrote. “I also want to thank all of my teammates, coaches, trainers, staff and the 12’s (fans) for their support, respect, and friendship and for helping me grow into the player, father, and person I am today. I have been treated with nothing but first class by everyone associated with the Seattle Seahawks and for that I am forever grateful.“Although I disagree with the circumstances surrounding my suspension, I accept responsibility for all of my actions and I apologize for any that causes any unflattering reflections of my family and the Seahawks. I believe in my innocence and will continue to fight with all legal resources available to me to.”Browner, who was injured in Week 10 against Atlanta and hasn’t played since, filed an appeal of the suspension while injured, and the Seahawks were waiting for an answer from the league. Seattle coach Pete Carroll said earlier Wednesday, before the suspension was announced, that he was frustrated that the process for making a determination on Browner’s status had taken so long.“It has taken a long time and I’ve been a little disappointed in that, but we’re handling it,” Carroll said.Browner is in his third season with the Seahawks. He started all 26 games he has played for the Seahawks and has 19 tackles, one interception and 10 passes defensed this season. He was a Pro Bowl selection in 2011 when he had 23 passes defensed and six interceptions, but had not been able to match those numbers in the subsequent two seasons.Browner was to become a free agent after the season and could file for reinstatement after one year. read more

Baseball Is Finally Realizing That The Save Is Dumb

Baseball’s trade deadline last week provided a referendum on how much value relief pitchers have in today’s game. And the results were fairly clear: Teams just don’t care about saves as much as they used to.This season, we’ve been using our new relief pitching statistic, the goose egg, to track how bullpens are used. And the way relievers are deployed has, in fact, changed. Although it hasn’t been quite as dramatic as, say, the widespread adaptation of the defensive shift in baseball, there’s at least some evidence of teams using their best relief pitchers in smarter ways — using them in the highest-leverage situations, regardless of whether or not a save is on the line. Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen, who has been the best relief pitcher in baseball this season, is one prominent example. He often enters games in situations that the goose egg rewards but the save does not — such as when the score is tied, or anytime before the ninth inning.1Yes, a reliever can get a save if he enters the game before the ninth inning and finishes the game. But he doesn’t get any extra credit for pitching extra innings. And he doesn’t get a save if another pitcher closes out the game. (A goose egg is essentially a clutch, scoreless relief inning.)But a series of deadline trades provided evidence on the diminished value that teams place on saves. Plenty of relief pitchers were traded, but teams were seemingly indifferent about whether the pitchers they’d acquired had accumulated high save totals or not. Take the Twins’ Brandon Kintzler, for example, who was picked up by the Washington Nationals for minor-league pitching prospect Tyler Watson and international bonus pool money. Kintzler was second in the American League with 28 saves, and the Nationals have struggled to close out games all season — so you might have expected them to give up a king’s ransom for him. Instead they gave up … Watson, who had been the Nationals’ 27th best prospect before the season and had a 4.35 ERA in Single-A at the time he was dealt.Other pitchers with high save totals, such as the Padres’ Brandon Maurer’ and the Marlins’ A.J. Ramos, didn’t fetch high prices, either. The prospects the Mets gave up for Ramos — pitcher Merandy Gonzalez and outfielder Ricardo Cespedes — were rated No. 14 and No. 23 in their system by Baseball America before the year began. The Mets also traded their own interim closer, Addison Reed, to Boston, nabbing three prospects; but none of them ranked higher than No. 20 in the Red Sox system. It’s not that the teams are giving up nothing for saves, exactly. But we’re a long ways removed from the days of the (infamous) Heathcliff Slocumb trade, when even mediocre closers could bring an elite prospect or two in return.And teams aren’t necessarily privileging the closer’s old role when he switches teams. Kintzler isn’t expected to close many games in Washington; instead, he’s the No. 2 or No. 3 option in the bullpen behind Sean Doolittle, who had just three saves for the A’s at the time he was acquired in July. Maurer will only be the third option in the Royals’ bullpen. Ramos will close out games for the Mets, but only because regular closer Jeurys Familia is hurt and Reed was traded.If teams are looking to goose eggs for guidance instead of saves, the National League leaders are Jansen and the Brewers’ Corey Knebel, who have 33 goose eggs each. Cleveland’s Andrew Miller leads the AL with 31 goose eggs, but he’s now injured, which could allow Tampa Bay’s Alex Colome (30 goose eggs) or Seattle’s Edwin Diaz (29 goose eggs) to pass him.Jansen has been by far the most effective reliever in baseball, as measured by goose wins above replacement (GWAR). He’s maintained a perfect record on the season with no broken eggs,2Jansen did have one rough outing last month, yielding three runs in a game against the Braves, but those didn’t come in a goose situation. our term for when a pitcher has an opportunity for a goose egg but allows an earned run instead, and 33 goose eggs — good for 4.8 GWAR. Miller leads the AL with 3.2 GWAR. A complete rundown of goose statistics follows in the table below. Domingo GermanNYY010-0.4 Arodys VizcainoATL1962+0.6 PITCHER▲▼TEAM▲▼GOOSE EGGS▲▼BROKEN EGGS▲▼MEHS▲▼GWAR▲▼ Cody AllenCLE1863+0.7 Jose TorresSD441-0.9 Jayson AquinoBAL010-0.4 Hector SantiagoMIN010-0.4 Matt BarnesBOS1663+0.4 Daniel StumpfDET214-0.1 Trevor RosenthalSTL2471+0.9 Dan AltavillaSEA331-0.7 Vidal NunoBAL010-0.4 T. J. McFarlandARI621+0.2 Blake TreinenOAK/WAS1061-0.7 Joe KellyBOS724+0.4 Craig KimbrelBOS2340+2.2 Luis GarciaPHI742-0.4 Josh EdginNYM525+0.0 Dan OteroCLE200+0.3 Jeff BeliveauTOR111-0.2 Jake BarrettARI203+0.3 Adam KolarekTB021-0.7 Ryne StanekTB013-0.4 Francisco LirianoHOU020-0.7 Justin GrimmCHC301+0.4 Brett CecilSTL1443+0.6 Wade DavisCHC2011+2.6 Miguel CastroBAL101+0.2 Dellin BetancesNYY1851+1.0 Ryan TeperaTOR2030+2.0 Josh CollmenterATL020-0.7 Danny BarnesTOR742-0.4 George KontosSF863-1.1 Al AlburquerqueKC010-0.4 Mike DunnCOL1002+1.6 Warwick SaupoldDET112-0.2 Rex BrothersATL321-0.3 Yovani GallardoSEA100+0.2 Sergio RomoLAD/TB330-0.7 Brian DuensingCHC300+0.4 Caleb SmithNYY110-0.2 Ian KrolATL623+0.2 Drew StorenCIN323-0.3 Greg HollandCOL2330+2.7 Hunter StricklandSF1741+1.0 Robert GsellmanNYM210-0.1 Joe SmithTOR1611+2.1 Anthony SwarzakCHW/MIL1610+2.0 Brad HandSD2845+2.6 Robert StephensonCIN220-0.4 Hoby MilnerPHI001+0.0 J. C. RamirezLAA020-0.7 Check out our latest MLB predictions. Brent SuterMIL001+0.0 Tommy HunterTB1821+2.0 Ken GilesHOU1233+0.7 Justin WilsonCHC/DET2251+1.5 Corey KnebelMIL3362+2.7 Brad ZieglerMIA512+0.4 Nick VincentSEA2025+2.3 Matt BushTEX1662+0.4 Jordan LylesCOL210+0.0 Brad PeacockHOU101+0.1 Carl EdwardsCHC1563+0.0 Tyler DuffeyMIN1032+0.4 Andrew ChafinARI266-1.9 Jesse ChavezLAA010-0.4 Sean DoolittleOAK/WAS1125+0.9 Joe BiaginiTOR932+0.3 Dominic LeoneTOR426-0.1 Jhan MarinezMIL/PIT320-0.3 Mike MontgomeryCHC1321+1.2 Bryan MitchellNYY010-0.4 Enny RomeroWAS1346+0.4 Adam OttavinoCOL1373-0.4 Bryan MorrisSF300+0.4 Santiago CasillaOAK1672-0.2 Yusmeiro PetitLAA1112+1.3 Doug FisterBOS420-0.1 Wandy PeraltaCIN1131+0.5 Erasmo RamirezTB712+0.7 Tyler WilsonBAL111-0.2 Deolis GuerraLAA720+0.3 Wade LeBlancPIT232-0.8 Sammy SolisWAS120-0.6 Derek LawSF1131+0.5 Ryan GartonTB030-1.1 Tyler PillNYM010-0.4 Brad BoxbergerTB231-0.8 Matt AlbersWAS924+0.6 Seung-hwan OhSTL2154+1.2 Mychal GivensBAL1633+1.4 Michael FelizHOU110-0.2 Jake PetrickaCHW202+0.3 Pedro StropCHC1313+1.5 Paul SewaldNYM642-0.6 Kyle RyanDET210-0.1 Albert SuarezSF310+0.1 Liam HendriksOAK951-0.5 Chad GreenNYY022-0.7 Tony ZychSEA843-0.3 Erik GoeddelNYM110-0.2 Jason GrilliTEX/TOR433-0.5 Koda GloverWAS822+0.4 Taylor RogersMIN1863+0.5 Keone KelaTEX832+0.2 Adam WarrenNYY831+0.2 Frankie MontasOAK110-0.2 Darren O’DayBAL932+0.3 Cory GearrinSF831+0.1 Alec AsherBAL311+0.1 Chris HatcherLAD121-0.6 Dovydas NeverauskasPIT200+0.3 Carlos TorresMIL643-0.6 Sam FreemanATL712+0.7 Phil MatonSD711+0.7 Eric O’FlahertyATL211-0.1 Jose LeclercTEX723+0.4 Mike BolsingerTOR310+0.1 Koji UeharaCHC1553+0.3 Ryan PresslyMIN421-0.1 Edwin DiazSEA2952+2.5 Wily PeraltaMIL120-0.6 Ernesto FrieriTEX010-0.4 Aaron BummerCHW120-0.6 James PazosSEA1034+0.4 Jeurys FamiliaNYM412+0.2 Craig BreslowMIN010-0.4 David HernandezARI/LAA1213+1.4 Dario AlvarezTEX201+0.3 Chad QuallsCOL210+0.0 Kelvin HerreraKC2352+1.8 Shawn KelleyWAS620+0.1 Josh OsichSF325-0.3 Joe JimenezDET010-0.4 Steven OkertSF648-0.6 Matt BelisleMIN1633+1.3 Giovanny GallegosNYY010-0.4 Marc RzepczynskiSEA816+0.8 Craig StammenSD301+0.4 Mark LeiterPHI010-0.4 Ross StriplingLAD641-0.6 Tony SippHOU110-0.2 Grant DaytonLAD112-0.2 Luis AvilanLAD424-0.2 Zach PutnamCHW200+0.3 Pedro BaezLAD1146+0.1 Oliver PerezWAS514+0.4 Travis WoodKC331-0.6 Chris RusinCOL833+0.2 Jacob TurnerWAS520+0.0 Kevin QuackenbushSD120-0.6 Buddy BaumannSD111-0.2 Josh SmithOAK200+0.3 Juan NicasioPIT1068-0.7 Fernando SalasNYM554-1.1 Miguel SocolovichSTL101+0.1 Hansel RoblesNYM742-0.5 Fernando AbadBOS501+0.8 Dan JenningsCHW/TB248-1.2 Chris DevenskiHOU1785-0.5 Jake JunisKC200+0.3 Donnie HartBAL313+0.1 Aroldis ChapmanNYY1312+1.7 Francis MartesHOU110-0.2 Rafael MonteroNYM131-1.0 Oliver DrakeMIL421-0.1 Tony CingraniCIN423-0.1 Daniel CoulombeOAK234-0.8 Kevin SiegristSTL812+0.8 Randall DelgadoARI500+0.8 Chase WhitleyTB641-0.6 Jason MotteATL212-0.1 David RobertsonCHW/NYY1951+1.0 Brandon MaurerKC/SD1870+0.1 Alex ClaudioTEX1535+1.3 Adam MorganPHI200+0.3 Mike MinorKC1743+1.2 Luke JacksonATL100+0.1 Fernando RodneyARI2243+1.9 Ryan MadsonOAK/WAS1831+1.6 Addison ReedBOS/NYM2555+1.8 Matt StrahmKC231-0.8 Sam DysonSF/TEX1982-0.1 Dustin McGowanMIA311+0.1 Nick GoodyCLE001+0.0 Matt GraceWAS112-0.2 Aaron LoupTOR327-0.3 Richard BleierBAL411+0.3 Chris YoungKC100+0.2 Ty BlachSF101+0.1 Evan ScribnerSEA020-0.7 Jumbo DiazTB653-0.9 Andrew KittredgeTB110-0.2 Joe BlantonWAS320-0.3 Ben HellerNYY101+0.2 Jeanmar GomezPHI721+0.3 Sam TuivailalaSTL320-0.3 Ronald HerreraNYY010-0.4 Daniel HudsonPIT644-0.6 Rubby De La RosaARI011-0.4 Bruce RondonDET420-0.1 Tyler ClippardCHW/NYY897-2.0 Drew SteckenriderMIA210-0.1 Alex ColomeTB3063+2.3 Tony BarnetteTEX630-0.1 Hector RondonCHC931+0.2 Jake McGeeCOL1042+0.2 Pat NeshekCOL/PHI1925+2.1 Drew VerHagenDET210-0.1 Goose stats through Aug. 6, 2017 Blaine HardyDET121-0.6 Zach BrittonBAL800+1.2 Justin HaleyMIN110-0.2 Austin BriceCIN300+0.5 Ryan DullOAK523+0.0 Kyle BarracloughMIA1341+0.4 Carlos EstevezCOL100+0.2 Nate JonesCHW410+0.2 Logan VerrettBAL400+0.6 Diego MorenoTB010-0.4 Jacob BarnesMIL2373+0.9 Roberto OsunaTOR2271+0.9 Neftali FelizKC/MIL1050-0.3 Josh FieldsLAD342-1.1 Michael LorenzenCIN2341+2.0 Junichi TazawaMIA530-0.4 Jared HughesMIL941-0.1 Source: Seamheads.com Hector NerisPHI2053+1.1 Alex WoodLAD301+0.4 Jose AlvaradoTB743-0.4 Chris BeckCHW012-0.4 Ryan BuchterKC/SD1463-0.2 David PhelpsMIA/SEA1683-0.6 Matthew BowmanSTL1654+0.5 Stefan ChrichtonBAL010-0.4 Tanner ScheppersTEX101+0.2 Scott AlexanderKC321-0.3 Luke GregersonHOU752-0.8 Mike MorinLAA101+0.2 Jean MachiSEA101+0.2 Brooks PoundersLAA100+0.2 Antonio BastardoPIT010-0.4 AJ RamosMIA1542+0.7 Blake ParkerLAA1531+1.2 Joaquin BenoitPHI/PIT16100-1.3 Casey FienPHI/SEA320-0.3 Kevin McCarthyKC100+0.2 Lucas HarrellTOR001+0.0 Nick WittgrenMIA611+0.5 Heath HembreeBOS945+0.0 Josh SmokerNYM723+0.3 Tom WilhelmsenARI112-0.2 Will HarrisHOU1630+1.3 Robby ScottBOS329-0.2 Joakim SoriaKC2572+1.3 Kenyan MiddletonLAA310+0.1 Ben TaylorBOS101+0.2 Cam BedrosianLAA633-0.2 Mark MelanconSF940-0.2 Jose RamirezATL1442+0.6 Shane GreeneDET1534+1.2 Josh HaderMIL202+0.3 J. P. HowellTOR010-0.4 Brock StewartLAD200+0.3 Blaine BoyerBOS510+0.4 PITCHER▲▼TEAM▲▼GOOSE EGGS▲▼BROKEN EGGS▲▼MEHS▲▼GWAR▲▼ Miguel DiazSD010-0.4 Zach McAllisterCLE111-0.2 Buddy BoshersMIN010-0.4 John AxfordOAK120-0.6 Rob ScahillMIL110-0.2 Boone LoganCLE104+0.2 Kirby YatesLAA/SD831+0.1 Robbie RossBOS100+0.2 Jeremy JeffressTEX131-0.9 Scott ObergCOL623+0.3 Jonathan HolderNYY611+0.6 Trevor HildenbergerMIN310+0.1 Jonathan BroxtonSTL120-0.6 A. J. SchugelPIT100+0.1 Francisco RodriguezDET382-2.5 Parker BridwellLAA001+0.0 John BrebbiaSTL001+0.0 Tony WatsonLAD/PIT2274+0.7 J. J. HooverARI632-0.2 Jarlin GarciaMIA002+0.0 Steve CishekSEA/TB512+0.4 Jim JohnsonATL1983-0.1 Brandon MorrowLAD330-0.7 Greg InfanteCHW011-0.4 Archie BradleyARI2245+1.9 Chasen ShreveNYY623+0.2 Brad BrachBAL2341+2.1 James HoytHOU110-0.2 Casey LawrenceTOR010-0.4 Alex WilsonDET1165-0.5 Felipe RiveroPIT3132+3.5 Tommy KahnleCHW/NYY1471-0.5 Andrew MillerCLE3152+3.2 Chase De JongSEA010-0.4 Kenley JansenLAD3301+4.8 Akeel MorrisATL001+0.0 Xavier CedenoTB013-0.4 Jerry BlevinsNYM1447+0.6 Simon CastroOAK010-0.4 Joely RodriguezPHI524+0.0 Peter MoylanKC803+1.2 Brandon WorkmanBOS410+0.3 Jose AlvarezLAA553-1.1 Bud NorrisLAA1671-0.2 Asher WojciechowskiCIN100+0.2 Johnny BarbatoPIT010-0.4 Emilio PaganSEA120-0.6 Ricardo PintoPHI011-0.4 Austin PruittTB300+0.5 Neil RamirezNYM012-0.4 Tyler LyonsSTL012-0.4 Chad BellDET001+0.0 Raisel IglesiasCIN2410+3.2 Adam ConleyMIA010-0.4 Hector VelazquezBOS400+0.6 Jorge De La RosaARI1151-0.1 Brandon KintzlerMIN2244+1.9 Blake WoodCIN231-0.8 Gabriel YnoaBAL001+0.0 Danny FarquharTB832+0.1 Edubray RamosPHI3110-3.6 Bryan ShawCLE1744+1.3 Jandel GustaveHOU010-0.4 read more

Womens Basketball Ohio State wins secondstraight game defeating Cincinnati 6956

Ohio State redshirt senior guard Adreana Miller (15) pass the ball in the first half of the game against South Florida. Ohio State lost 71-47. Credit: Nick Hudak | For The LanternThe Ohio State women’s basketball team gained its third victory of the season and second in a row after defeating the Cincinnati Bearcats 69-56 on Sunday.The Buckeyes got off to a hot start with a 15-4 lead midway through the first quarter, making six of seven from the field and three of four from 3-point range to start the game, one of which was a milestone 3 from redshirt senior guard Adreana Miller.Miller recorded her 1,000th career point on a 3 ball, helping Ohio State to the highest scoring quarter of the season, scoring 26 points to pair with a season high 85 percent shooting for a quarter.The Buckeyes carried their momentum into a 17-point lead at halftime powered by freshman forward Dorka Juhasz’s game-high 10 points and seven rebounds.The second half turned into a much more competitive affair as the Bearcats chipped away against Ohio State behind the strength of a team-high 14 points by junior guard Sam Rodgers, who played a game-high 37 minutes.The Buckeyes made many mental mistakes and had missed opportunities that allowed Cincinnati to get back into a game that head coach Kevin McGuff said should have been wrapped up earlier.“Good to kind of see us getting together and finish the game out,” McGuff said. “But it was disappointing. We played such a good first half and thought in the third quarter had chances to really stretch the lead out, and put a lot of game pressure on them and probably end it. But they kept playing hard and we kept making mental mistakes.”Cincinnati narrowed the lead to just three points in the second half when the Bearcats went on an 11-0 run. Comparably, Ohio State was unable to find its scoring touch, going more than five minutes without a basket.“I think the problems were like mental problems,” Juhasz said. “We missed lots of great shots, free throws, lots of turnovers. I think we have to reduce it because we will have tougher games.”While Ohio State’s 19 turnovers illustrated the mental breakdowns during the game, the team was able to stay resilient and end the game on a 10-0 run highlighted by two 3-point shots off the bench by junior guard Jensen Caretti.The Buckeyes (3-2) next face the Washington Huskies (4-3) on the road Wednesday. read more

Just a few weeks ago it was revealed that the FBI

center_img A service requires daily work, most of it less than exciting. And there is no end to it. The contribution – the gift – requires a specific and limited expense of time and passion. Zuck: Dumb f*cks Anything you run through a free service goes beyond your control, immediately and permanently. These companies are monetizing your life, and the lives of your family and friends. Again, you are the product, and they’re selling you to anyone who will pay. No one really runs a service for free. The same thing goes for smartphone apps, by the way. They give them to you for free, or for almost free, and they also sell your life to anyone who will pay. The primary purpose of most apps is to spy on you. Read their privacy statements sometime. “Nothing Bad Will Happen” This is said every day, as it has been by more or less all the victims of history. I’m not for walking around in fear of course, but if you grab at “free” products, you are stepping into a trap. If you don’t know the price in advance, you’ll be charged anyway (in this case, by having your life sold), and you’ll overpay. And bad things do happen, as they did to Brandon Raub. Is ‘saving’ a couple bucks really that big a deal? Paul Rosenberg FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more

center_img Justin: And he thinks these phyles will replace governments completely?Doug: There will still be governments that control certain geographical areas. After all, governments have lots of force. And most people are like chimpanzees; they crave, or at least accept, leadership by the biggest and most aggressive monkey. But I expect many will eventually be replaced by phyles. This will be technology driven.And with migration unfolding the way it is, Africa is going to have hundreds of millions of Han Chinese changing the situation on that continent. They’re basically going to take over that continent. At the same time, scores of millions of African migrants will take over Europe.Those are two big trends that I feel certain about. Who knows what other side shows will happen? But the nation state in its present form is a dead duck. And good riddance to it.Justin: I find the concept of phyles fascinating. But can you help me better understand how they’d work? How big would they be? Would they span across countries and continents?Doug: Well, again, people naturally fall into groups of the like-minded, joined by the things that are most important to them. They could be their philosophy, their religion, or their occupation. In prisons, for instance, it’s race. Inmates self-segregate. The concept is a perversion of the phyle concept, in a way. But to many people race is the most important thing in their lives.Every individual has several, or a dozen, or perhaps a score of things that are important to them. In my case, my friends are people who share my worldview. They believe in maximum social and economic freedom. Those are good qualifiers. I also prefer—I’m quite exclusionary, actually, no “diversity”—people who are honest and competent. And I tend to associate with people of the same economic status because I frankly find that poor people mostly don’t usually bring much to the party.Justin: Why do you say that?Doug: Poor people are usually poor for a reason. They have bad habits. I know all the excuses and sob stories, and some of them are even true. But I don’t want to associate with people who have bad habits, whether they’re rich or poor.I can probably put my finger on about 25 or 30 people in the world that I’d want standing next to me when it’s time to fix bayonets. But that doesn’t, incidentally, include the average guy that lives in Aspen, Colorado, which is where I spend the northern summer. For that matter, it doesn’t apply to the average guy anywhere. In today’s world, “average” doesn’t cut it.In most cases people maintain an acceptable social veneer. But they’re not reliable or trustworthy enough to be part of a phyle that I’d join.There will end up being thousands of phyles, everything from the Hell’s Angels to the Rotary Club. And that’s a good thing. It’s much better than just dealing with the people who happen to live in your area. — Lots of folks hound me to know how I became a pot stock millionaire. I’ll tell you up front, the way I did it is too risky for most. But we’ve discovered a much safer way to play pot stocks. It’s obvious marijuana will soon be legalized everywhere and we’re on the ground floor of a pot bull market. In this video, I reveal how you should play the pot stock bull market. Justin: How long could it be before nation states start going up in smoke? It seems like this is already happening in Europe where many countries appear eager to break off from the European Union (EU).Doug: No question about that. The EU is a complete dog’s breakfast, and has become totally counterproductive. One thing that you can plan your life around is that the EU will break up, dry up, and blow away. It’s completely dysfunctional. It makes absolutely no sense to have 50,000 bureaucrats, useless mouths, in Brussels making everybody’s life miserable.The EU started out as a free trade zone for iron and coal. Good, but unnecessary. And then it metastasized. The idea of a political group managing free trade is a contradiction, idiotic actually. You only need each individual government to drop its barriers, duties, and quotas—unilaterally. The US, and any other country, should have zero of these things, for its own benefit. Otherwise it’s like putting yourself under embargo.Free trade is wonderful and natural. But having the EU or NAFTA facilitate trade is ridiculous and counter functional. The same goes for the United Nations, which is nothing but a corrupt club for bureaucrats. It serves no purpose, and should be abolished. It’s just a drain on the world economy, the EU on steroids.One of the nice things about the Greater Depression, which we entered upon in 2007, is that these governments will become unaffordable. The United States will soon find out that its giant military/industrial/security complex is not only bankrupting the country, but putting it in serious danger. It doesn’t “defend” the US, but draws attacks and creates enemies. And it certainly doesn’t defend freedom, rather the opposite.All their domestic welfare programs are not only unaffordable but—even if they were free—are actively destructive. They’ll fall apart during the coming time of economic stress. And that’s a good thing, although the period of change will certainly be inconvenient and unpleasant for many people.What scares me is that people will act like chimpanzees during this chaos. They’ll be afraid. And they’ll want somebody to protect them. But that, of course, is asking for real trouble.Leaders that promise the most freebies, and the most safety, usually end up being someone like Stalin, Hitler, or Mao. That will happen in the States, too. We’re no longer the country we once were not so long ago.I mean, a lot of people hate Trump. I don’t have any particular animosity toward him. Sure, he’s done some pretty stupid things; his foreign policy of late borders on the criminally insane. But at least the Deep State—which really exists, should any naïfs have any doubt—hates him. And that shows he’s doing a few things right…But what really scares me is the next president, because that person will be elected in the middle of a gigantic crisis. And I’m afraid that Americans will pick someone very, very dangerous.Justin: What will happen to public services when nation states get wiped out? Will phyles provide things like defense and education? Who will be responsible for public infrastructure like roads and bridges?Doug: Well, there’s absolutely nothing that the government does that entrepreneurs couldn’t do better and cheaper.The only justification for the State is its pure coercive power. People seem to think it’s necessary to have an organization with massive coercive power on top of society. That’s the essence of the state. It’s supposed to protect you from force initiated by other people. The army is there to protect you from people outside your geographical area. The police are there to protect you from criminals within your geographical area. And a court system that allows you to adjudicate disputes without resorting to force.That’s what governments are supposed to do, at least in theory. I could live with a government that did that, and only that. But many governments, including the U.S. government, do these jobs incompetently, and at inordinate cost. Worse, they try to do absolutely everything else.In fact, I don’t believe the State should do anything. It’s innately dangerous, incompetent, and always draws the worst kind of people.It certainly shouldn’t be in charge of education. That’s the responsibility of parents. Education is the last thing that should be handed over to the State, if only because the public schools always tend to indoctrinate kids rather than educate them. Public schools also take responsibility away from parents. That makes them irresponsible, which is disastrous.What else? Welfare? Before the Roosevelt regime, Americans used to provide charity on a one-to-one basis. You found somebody who was worthy of help and you helped them. Or you joined something like the Rotary, Optimists, Lions, Knights of Columbus, or what-have-you. There used to be 1,000 organizations like that. Their business was to help people who deserved help.But all these organizations have been minimized because of the huge amounts of capital the State draws out of society. The State has replaced them. In the process the State has cemented the proles to the bottom of the barrel with their institutionalized programs.And this is true of absolutely everything and everywhere the government sticks its tentacles.Justin: Thanks for speaking with me today, Doug.Doug: You’re welcome.Justin’s note: Most know Doug as a legendary crisis investor. But he’s also a “marijuana millionaire.” And on Thursday, April 26 at 8 p.m. ET, he’s joining me and Crisis Investing editor Nick Giambruno to discuss why investors will be handed a rare second chance at investing in this market.This second wave is expected to be 8 times bigger than the first, when pot stocks were gaining 3,986%, 17,300%, 69,000%… even 299,000% and 399,000%.To hear from Doug himself on this exclusive FREE event—and why the time to strike is now—click here.Reader MailbagDo you agree with Doug’s take on nation states? Do you think they’ll ultimately be replaced with phyles? Let us know here.A Fed-Issued Digital Currency? As soon as July 21st, governments around the world plan to send the entire crypto market through the floor. They aim to take control of your wealth and what it’s worth. But there are simple things you can do today to protect yourself… Find out here.last_img read more