Agricultural college sees surge in demand

first_img#SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Email Advertisement Twitter Previous articleLimerick students won’t take cuts lying downNext articleCouncillors row over Joint Policing Committee John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie THE number of applicants to courses at the Salesian Agricultural College in Pallaskenry has tripled in the last five years.In 2009 the college was threatened with closure as the demand for agricultural courses was so low, but now the college is forced to turn away students due to the high number of applications.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Principal John McCarthy told Limerick Post: “Since 2008 there has been a two to three-fold increase in our numbers and that has been across the board in all courses. Depending on the courses, we can’t accommodate all the applicants at this stage.“This year we have nearly 400 students; about four or five years ago we would have had between 100 to 120 and that was about it. Just a few short years ago I was campaigning with politicians to try to keep the college open and now we’ve gone to the other extreme.”Points for the college’s Higher Certificate in Agricultural Mechanisation, run in conjunction with LIT, have also risen, reflecting the increase in demand.Salesian Agricultural College is also privately paying two extra teaching staff to cope with the surge in student numbers.Mr McCarthy continued: “We also have a direct entry Certificate in Agriculture where we take 100 students and we have a long waiting list for that at the moment. Our Advanced Certificate in Mechanisation takes 26 students and we had about 60 applicants this year.”Regarding possible factors that may have led to the rise in popularity for agricultural courses, Mr McCarthy explained:  “First of all there are now a huge amount of young people looking at the area of agriculture. Secondly the jobs just are not there elsewhere, so people see the positives in having a business at home and getting work and an income from that. During the Celtic Tiger years the income from farming wouldn’t have been able to compete with a lot of other areas.” WhatsApp Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsAgricultural college sees surge in demandBy John Keogh – September 2, 2013 720 center_img TAGSagricultureeducationMusic LimerickSalesian Agricultural College Facebook Linkedin Limerick social entrepreneurs honoured for their work in response to covid-19 Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy Print Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launchlast_img read more

I Can’t Sing! For Now! X Factor Musical Delays Previews

first_img View Comments The West End’s new musical comedy and fictional X Factor spoof I Can’t Sing! has delayed previews due to technical issues. Previously scheduled to begin performances at the London Palladium February 27, the show, starring Olivier Award winner Nigel Harman, Cynthia Erivo and Alan Morrisey, will now start on March 1. Opening night remains set for March 26. Along with Harman, Ervio and Morrisey, the show will also star Ashley Knight, Victoria Elliot, Simon Bailey and Billy Carter.center_img Directed by Sean Foley, I Can’t Sing! features music by Steve Brown and a book and additional lyrics by British comic Harry Hill. The production tells the story of Chenice (Erivo), who lives in an ITV blackspot because her grandad’s iron lung interferes with the signal in her caravan—she’s the only girl in the world who has never heard of The X Factor. When she accidentally stumbles into an audition with her talking dog, she starts a journey to both stardom and love. I Can’t Sing! goes beyond the microphone and under the judges’ desk to reveal the (not necessarily accurate) story of heartache and laughter that keeps millions tuning in every week.last_img read more