BHF adds Virtual Collect option to Help a Heart campaign

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Tagged with: Digital About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The British Heart Foundation’s (BHF) annual Help a Heart campaign this year includes a viral marketing element in the form of its Virtual Collection.While the heart charity is still recruiting its traditional team of collectors to help raise money by delivering cash collection envelopes from door to door, it is encouraging people to set up a ‘Virtual Collection’ online on their blog or website. They can personlise their page with a photo and their words.Once people have set up a fundraising page, using the services of Justgiving.com, they can then email its details to their friends and contacts.BHF describes this new tool as collecting “inbox to inbox instead of house to house.”Jackie Skeel, Head of Fundraising Campaigns at the BHF said: “The BHF is constantly striving to find new ways to make it easier for people to support our campaigns and the Virtual Collection is the perfect answer for people who are pushed for time. Just by making a couple of clicks you’ll be helping to save lives by raising vital funds so we can continue to invest in groundbreaking research.”www.bhf.org.uk/virtualcollect  40 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 BHF adds Virtual Collect option to Help a Heart campaign Howard Lake | 13 May 2008 | Newslast_img read more

House Subcommittee Says Bad Policy Caused Crisis, Dodd-Frank Missed the Mark

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / House Subcommittee Says Bad Policy Caused Crisis, Dodd-Frank Missed the Mark Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Dodd-Frank Act Financial Services Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Regulatory Burdens Wall Street Reform 2015-05-14 Brian Honea Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago House Subcommittee Says Bad Policy Caused Crisis, Dodd-Frank Missed the Mark Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Previous: Aspen Grove Solutions Renews National Appraisal Congress Sponsorship Next: Delinquencies, Bankruptcies, Foreclosures Improve; Household Debt Still 6.5% Below Peak Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Witnesses at a House subcommittee hearing on Wednesday testified that the Dodd-Frank Act introduced new problems and may have even laid the groundwork for another financial crisis, according to an announcement from the House Financial Services Committee earlier this week.In Wednesday’s hearing titled “The Dodd-Frank Act and Regulatory Overreach,” the Financial Services Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations examined the causes of the 2008 financial crisis and the subsequent passage of Dodd-Frank in 2010 along with the regulatory burdens that Dodd-Frank created.”Those who supported Dodd-Frank have been more concerned with helping special interests in Washington than their constituents back home and the proof is in the numbers,” said Representative Sean Duffy (R-Wisconsin), chairman of the subcommittee. “Fewer people have returned to the work force than in any other modern recovery. Our community banks are closing every week, Main Street lenders are being slowly euthanized and the number one cause that I hear from people in Wisconsin is the excessive regulatory burden imposed by this administration. Dodd-Frank is a major cause of that burden.”Duffy said that the “crushing regulatory regime” of Dodd-Frank has perpetuated unemployment, stifled hiring, and made it harder for people to obtain loans to either buy a home or expand their business.One of the witnesses at the hearing, Dean and Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law Paul G. Mahoney, said a consequence of Dodd-Frank will be fewer and larger banks in the United States, because Dodd-Frank has layered on “costly new regulations that the large banks can afford but smaller ones cannot.”Key takeaways from Wednesday’s hearing include: Dodd-Frank was hastily passed in reaction to the financial crisis and benefits big banks at the expense of consumers; the 2008 financial crisis was caused not by market failures but by bad federal government housing policies that pushed people into buying homes they could not afford, and that regulators charged with monitoring the financial system failed to act until it was too late despite having all the authority they needed to regulate the system; and that Dodd-Frank will be ineffective at preventing the next financial crisis because it failed to address the fundamental causes of the 2008 crisis, and it paved the way for the next financial crisis by passing “too big to fail” into law and allowing taxpayer-funded bailouts for financial institutions deemed as “systemically important.”Another witness at Wednesday’s hearing, Hester Peirce, Director of the Financial Markets Working Group at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, said that the drafters of Dodd-Frank were working without full information, since the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission which Congress charged with determining the cause of the financial crisis did not issue a report until six months after Dodd-Frank was passed into law.”As the failures and bailouts of the financial crisis accumulated, so too did the calls for a quick and thorough rewriting of the financial regulatory rulebook,” Peirce said. “The resulting Act was the product of fear and fury, not of careful analysis. Grounded in an inaccurate market failure narrative, Dodd-Frank expands regulators’ authority to enable them to play a more central role in managing the financial system and identifying and mitigating systemic risks. This approach to financial regulation, while a natural response to a market failure narrative, only increases the vulnerability of financial system to regulatory failure.” Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago May 14, 2015 1,277 Views Tagged with: Dodd-Frank Act Financial Services Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Regulatory Burdens Wall Street Reform About Author: Brian Honea Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

4-H Tech Changemakers

first_imgWith increased electronic communication leaving many members of older generations behind, a partnership between the Microsoft Corporation and the National 4-H Council has mobilized an energized group of 4-H Technology Changemakers to help provide resources and training to level the playing field.One of the first sites selected to begin implementing the 4-H Tech Changemakers program was Murray County, Georgia, where 4-H youth began working with older individuals living in rural communities on the value and use of technology and digitalization.“An average of 20 to 25 youth became active 4-H Tech Changemakers,” said Stephanie Skojac, a 4-H agent with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in Murray County. “An average of 15 older adults would attend monthly meetings at the senior center, where the youth would act as the teachers in order to bridge the digital divide in our community.”As modern technology becomes a more integral part of everyday life, many older members of the community find it challenging to acquire new digital skills on their own.4-H Tech Changemakers is designed to bridge the digital divide between generations with a strategy geared toward combining the accessibility and affordability of broadband internet with the willingness of community members to adopt and use new technologyWith an increased number of people confined to their homes due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the need for electronic equity is greater than ever.“Although this project began long before the COVID-19 pandemic, we have seen the impacts of the digital divide now more than ever,” said Kasey Bozeman, UGA Extension 4-H specialist for science and environmental education. “A strong body of research indicates that people are less likely to purchase internet services if they do not have strong digital literacy skills. Not only can 4-H youth teach these skills to their peers and adults, but they can also advocate for this critical need that benefits their entire community.”The Murray County program began serving members at the local senior center, a hub for citizens over the age of 50 to gather and gain access to a variety of services. Seeing a greater need for digital literacy and resources within their community, youth from fourth through 12th grades had the opportunity to instruct the seniors while gaining their own benefits from the collaboration.“I found it surprising that the Murray County 4-H Tech Changemakers program not only helped older adults with their digital literacy skills but helped the youth develop leadership skills through teaching,” said Skojac. “Most importantly, it created lasting relationships between these older adults and the youth. They looked forward to seeing one another every month and that made this program very rewarding.”For youth chosen to lead this project, the change in perspective has helped them grow and appreciate the progress in their community.“Seniors are sometimes made to feel dumb when they don’t understand technology,” said Boaz Whealy, a 4-H Tech Changemaker attending Murray County High. “It’s really exciting when they begin to understand and start to love using technology.”For more information on the 4-H Technology Changemakers program, visit georgia4h.org and 4h.org.last_img read more