DEVENNEY RESPONDS TO CRITICISM FROM EAMON MCGEE OVER DUBLIN REMARKS

first_imgEamon McGee blasted comments made by former Donegal players prior to their match with Armagh, calling them ‘ridiculous’ and ‘disrespectful.’Former Donegal star Brendan Devenney has responded to the criticism he has received from Eamon McGee. McGee was seething over comments Devenney made regarding a potential meeting of Donegal and Dublin prior to Saturday’s match with Armagh.McGee blasted the comments, saying it was ridiculous and disrespectful to both Armagh and Monaghan. He also revealed that the players and management within the Donegal set-up were extremely disappointed by the commentary from former players prior to their All-Ireland quarter-final clash with Armagh.McGee said, “It was ridiculous. It was so disrespectful to Armagh and Monaghan.“Former players from Donegal who said it out during the week about a Donegal-Dublin semi-final was ludicrous and we were very disappointed in it.“But, look, that was outside the circle and it’s only what goes on inside the circles that matters. However Devenney responded to the criticism on Twitter, and clarified his position on the issue.The former St Eunan’s man said he was specifically asked twice during the interview about the potential semi-final match-up.Devenney tweeted, “I was asked about Donegal v Dublin twice, and twice I started my answer with this is very disrespectful to Armagh and Monaghan.DEVENNEY RESPONDS TO CRITICISM FROM EAMON MCGEE OVER DUBLIN REMARKS was last modified: August 12th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ArmaBlastedBrendan DevenneyCommentsdonegaldublinEamon McGeenewsRidiculousSportlast_img read more

Chelsea ‘preparing final offer’ for Wigan star Moses

first_imgChelsea are preparing a final offer of £7.5m for Wigan star Victor Moses, according to the Daily Mail.Wigan are believed to be holding out for £10m for the forward and have rejected a number of previous offers.The Mail also say Tottenham are considering a £7.5m bid for Liverpool winger Raheem Sterling.The 17-year-old from Harlesden has been linked with a loan move back to QPR, who lost him when he secured a transfer to Anfield in 2010.But it is claimed that Spurs are looking to sign him on a permanent basis.QPR want to sign Dimitar Berbatov from Manchester United, The Times report.It is suggested that Rangers are preparing a £5m bid for the Bulgarian, who has been widely tipped to leave Old Trafford this summer.This page is regularly updated. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Thank Evolution that Nothing Is Evil (or Good)

first_imgWhen evolutionists discuss the evolution of war, or of monogamy, or of religion, they rob mankind of any basis for judging good and evil.Cooperation evolves:  Another paper typical of the “evolution of cooperation by game theory” genre appeared in PNAS recently.  Revealing the Darwinian assumptions, the abstract states, ” In evolutionary models of indirect reciprocity, natural selection favors cooperation when observability is sufficiently high.”  Working with 2413 human participants as their lab rats, the authors implied their evolutionary model applies to all human behavior – including altruism and some of the most noble human ideals.  It’s all evolutionary selection.  It works the same way in yeast, except that humans have an inexplicable habit of helping people they don’t know, even when observability is zero.  “In sum,” they confidently assert nonetheless, “we show how indirect reciprocity can be harnessed to increase cooperation in a relevant, real-world public goods game.”  But is increased cooperation good?  Who judges what is public good?  And who harnesses the harnessers?Monogamy as an evolutionary strategy:  All the science news outlets repeated, without question, a claim in Science Magazine, based on an open-access paper in PNAS, that monogamy evolved from male infanticide (paper’s title: “Male infanticide leads to social monogamy in primates”).  The article begins with a photo of the royal couple with new baby, presumably as pawns of a large evolutionary game, thereby robbed of all dignity.  Typical quote from the article:Resolving this debate is important, researchers say, especially for understanding the evolution of human mating behavior. Although humans aren’t completely monogamous, “the emergence of pair-bonding in humans was a major evolutionary transition, which dramatically altered the evolutionary trajectory of our species,” says Sergey Gavrilets, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Many researchers think that we could not have evolved our large brains without joint parental care during the extended period of helplessness required for infant brains to grow to their full size. “Understanding the forces that drove that transition can help us better understand the causes of human uniqueness,” Gavrilets adds.Science Daily repeated this idea in two articles. Another uncritical news source was Live Science, although its staff writers allowed for other factors in the “evolution of monogamy” (and, incidentally, “the evolution of infanticide”).  Regardless of what other mammals do, none of these sources even considered whether monogamy is right or wrong for humans on any other basis than evolution.Thank evolution for… menopause:  Got hot flashes, women?  “Thank evolution,” Science Daily says.  Thanking presumes the purposeful appreciation for an intentional good act, or (in sarcasm), the despising of a purposefully bad act.  Obviously, one cannot thank evolution, a non-intelligent, purposeless process.  The fact that “menopause sets humans apart from other primates” might lead some to suppose a reason humans are set apart, but Darwinian evolution can come up with a “number of hypotheses” to explain any observation.  The article is full of questions, possibilities and suggestions.  That’s the habit of evolutionary explanations: imagining scenarios that portray humans, with all their uniquenesses, as descendents of apes through natural selection.Child sacrifice:  A more grotesque case of human evil was described in PNAS about Inca child sacrifice. Mummies of victims were seen to have been drugged before their deaths, and were probably seduced by the conviction they were helping the tribe in some way. The authors are very careful to describe, but not condemn, the treatment of these young victims:Examination of three frozen bodies, a 13-y-old girl and a girl and boy aged 4 to 5 y, separately entombed near the Andean summit of Volcán Llullaillaco, Argentina, sheds new light on human sacrifice as a central part of the Imperial Inca capacocha rite, described by chroniclers writing after the Spanish conquest. The high-resolution diachronic data presented here, obtained directly from scalp hair, implies escalating coca and alcohol ingestion in the lead-up to death. These data, combined with archaeological and radiological evidence, deepen our understanding of the circumstances and context of final placement on the mountain top. We argue that the individuals were treated differently according to their age, status, and ritual role. Finally, we relate our findings to questions of consent, coercion, and/or compliance, and the controversial issues of ideological justification and strategies of social control and political legitimation pursued by the expansionist Inca state before European contact.With language like that, can any of them argue that what the leaders did was wrong?  Maybe coercion was an evolutionary strategy for survival of the tribe.  Who could argue otherwise?  Live Science found good in this abhorrent rite: “After being selected for the deadly rite, the Maiden likely underwent a type of status change, becoming an important figure to the empire; the other two children may have served as her attendants.”  One of the paper’s co-authors found even more to praise in Inca child sacrifice:“[The Maiden] became somebody other than who she was before,” said study lead author Andrew Wilson, an archaeologist at the University of Bradford in the U.K. “Her sacrifice was seen as an honor.“Perhaps so, but was the Maiden not deceived by an evil system of lies, her life cut short unnecessarily?  How could an evolutionist argue that?  Live Science called it a method of social control that probably created a climate of fear, but that’s not the same thing as calling it evil.  In evolutionary terms, social control through fear might just be a workable strategy for survival; if not, well – lots of animal populations go extinct.Darwinian doctrine is a deadly poison on humanity.  It robs our humanness of everything that is good, true, or beautiful.  In Darwin’s imaginary universe, nothing is good, because there are no eternal, objective moral categories.  Stuff just happens.  Nothing is beautiful, because beauty is just a sensation of material neurons.  And nothing can be true, because Darwinian materialism denies the non-materiality and necessity of reason or logic.  Ay, there’s the rub: Darwinism destroys itself.  It cannot judge whether itself is good, true, or beautiful.  Indeed, it cannot be any of the above!  Such categories are ephemeral; they evolve, too, and can just as easily become their own opposites (evil is good, lies are true, ugliness is beautiful).  Such a position is hopelessly muddled and incoherent.  It destroys all reason, including reasons to argue for Darwinism.  The universal acid has eaten itself.Darwinists have lost their way.  They are wandering about, blinded by their own fogma.  Rescue them, and you will rescue humanity.  It would be a good, true, and beautiful thing to do.  Really. 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Infrastructure ‘needs private sector’

first_img25 October 2012 The government is considering a bigger role for the private sector and the country’s development finance institutions in order to boost funding for South Africa’s infrastructure drive, says Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan. Gordhan’s Medium Term Budget Policy Statement, which he presented in the National Assembly in Cape Town on Thursday, reveals that the pace of public infrastructure spending has picked up over the past 12 months. Gordhan told Parliament that the Presidential Infrastructure Co-ordinating Commission (PICC) had reviewed the details of 18 strategic infrastructure programmes, which would add to the current R845-billion infrastructure build programmes already in progress.Build programmes to accelerate investment He said the build programmes would accelerate energy, transport, water and housing investment, open up mining and industrial opportunities and give greater impetus to building economic linkages across southern Africa. “Strategic infrastructure programmes represent large and long-term financial commitments,” he said, adding that the budget provided for part of the funding required, while state-owned enterprises were making substantial investments in their areas of responsibility. While the bulk of infrastructure spending was financed from the balance sheets of state-owned companies, the fiscus funded the provision of social infrastructure, delivered primarily through provinces and municipalities, he said.Private sector investment down in 2011 The Medium Term Budget Policy Statement noted, however, that growth in private sector investment had slowed over 2011, as South African businesses refrained from developing new projects in an environment of weaker business confidence. In contrast, gross fixed capital formation by the public sector grew at 10.9% during the first half of this year, with Eskom, Transnet and the SA National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral) accounting for 95% of all capital spending by state-owned enterprises. Government spending on water, sanitation and road infrastructure had also picked up, supporting a nascent recovery in South Africa’s construction sector. The National Treasury believes that as the economic environment improves, rising confidence should result in a gradual improvement in private sector gross fixed capital formation. It said that, with private businesses accounting for about 71% of economic activity and over 75% of jobs, it was crucial to create a buoyant private sector that worked in partnership with an effective government. Domestic growth is expected to remain modest next year and to increase over the next three years, but Gordhan added that faster growth was needed to create the jobs South Africa needs. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

Photo: ESPN’s Chris Fowler Got A Selfie With Jim Harbaugh And Urban Meyer At Dick Vitale’s V Foundation Gala

first_imgJim Harbaugh addresses a group of reporters.Not many people in the sports world can bring Jim Harbaugh and Urban Meyer toghether, but Dick Vitale is one of them. The legendary college basketball analyst hosted his annual V Foundation gala last night, and many top figures in the college sports world turned out, including the rival Michigan and Ohio State coaches. Harbaugh and Meyer actually teamed up on stage to announce the winner of a raffle for a 2016 Mercedes Benz, and later took a selfie with ESPN’s Chris Fowler.Yes @OhioStateFB Urban Meyer & @umichfootball Jim Harbaugh are on stage together @DickieV gala @TheVFoundation pic.twitter.com/dp3bKQ8TRt— Josh Krulewitz (@jksports) May 14, 2016OK, this Harbaugh/Meyer selfie is focused better. So I’ll also share it for posterity, never to be recreated! pic.twitter.com/siZZt5LXaF— Chris Fowler (@cbfowler) May 14, 2016 That is quite the photo. At the end of the night, Vitale announced that the gala, which honored the late Chad Carr, had raised an estimated $2.8 million for pediatric cancer research. A wonderful job by Dickie V, and everyone else involved with the gala this year.last_img read more

Photo/Video: LSU Football Visited Flooding Evacuees This Afternoon

first_imgLSU football's Les Miles visits flooding evacuees.Twitter/@LSUfootballFor LSU football, today was a day to give back to a community still reeling from devastating flooding.The LSU football team took a break from training camp today to give back to those in need. Head coach Les Miles and his players visited the Celtic Media Centre in Baton Rouge to spend time with evacuees from the serious flooding that has plagued the area.Other LSU teams, such as men’s basketball, women’s volleyball and baseball, visited Celtic earlier in the week.The LSU Football team arriving at Celtic Media. pic.twitter.com/RrWhJoyH1Z— LSU Footbal (@LSUfootball) August 18, 2016Some of the media in attendance, including The Advocate’s Ross Dellenger and CBSNews’ Alyssa Estrada, also shared photos and footage. “Y’all got the best team this year, coach.” #LSU pic.twitter.com/y9hrCItlBZ— Ross Dellenger (@RossDellenger) August 18, 2016Awesome job by Miles and his team, and really the entire LSU athletic department, for giving back to their community.It looks like they were able to put a smile on the face of people who could really use one.last_img read more

Jan job creation at 17month high of 896 lakh EPFO data

first_imgNew Delhi: Net employment generation in the formal sector touched a 17-month high of 8.96 lakh in January, according to the latest Employees’ Provident Fund Organisation (EPFO) payroll data. The Employees’ Provident Fund Organisation has been releasing payroll data from April 2018, covering the period starting September 2017.The addition in January was 131 per cent higher as compared with 3.87 lakh Employees’ Provident Fund Organisation subscribers added in the year-ago month. In September 2017, a net of 2,75,609 jobs were created. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalAround 76.48 lakh new subscribers were added to social security schemes of the Employees’ Provident Fund Organisation from September 2017 to January 2019, the data showed. This indicates that these many jobs were created in the formal sector over the past 17 months. The net Employees’ Provident Fund Organisation enrolment in January 2019 stood at 8,96,516, which is the highest since September 2017. The Employees’ Provident Fund Organisation, however, revised slightly downwards its payroll data for December 2018 by 1.8 per cent to 7.03 lakh, against the earlier estimate of 7.16 lakh released last month. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostIt also revised the cumulative job addition data for the September 2017-December 2018 period downwards 6.6 per cent to 67.52 lakh, from the earlier forecast of 72.32 lakh. The sharpest revision was for March 2018 in the latest report which showed contraction or exit of 29,023 members from the EPFO subscriptions whereas last month’s estimated addition of 5,498 members. The EPFO data showed that the March 2018 figure is negative due to large number of exits reported in March, in view of it being the closing month of the financial year. During January 2019, the highest number of 2.44 lakh jobs were created in the 22-25 years age group, followed by 2.24 lakh in the 18-21 years age bracket. The data of the exited members is based on the claims submitted by the individuals and establishments and the exit data uploaded by employers, whereas the number of new subscribers is based on the Universal Account Number (UAN) generated in the system and those who have received non-zero subscription. The Employees’ Provident Fund Organisation said the data is provisional as updation of employee records is a continuous process and gets updated in subsequent months. This is age-band wise data of new members registered under the EPFO where the first non-zero contribution received during particular month. For each age-wise band, the estimates are net of the members newly enrolled, exited and rejoined during the month as per records of the EPFO, it added. The estimates may include temporary employees whose contributions may not be continuous for the entire year. Members’ data are linked to unique Aadhaar Identity, it added. The EPFO manages social security funds of workers in the organised/semi organised sector in India and has more than 6 crore active members (with at least one-month contribution in the year). Meanwhile, Fitch Ratings Friday cut India’s GDP growth forecast for the next fiscal to 6.8 per cent from 7 per cent estimated earlier on weaker than expected economic momentum. In its latest Global Economic Outlook, Fitch also slashed GDP growth forecast for current fiscal ending March 2019 to 6.9 per cent from 7.2 per cent projected in the December edition. The 6.9 per cent estimate is a notch lower than 7 per cent growth estimated by the Central Statiscs Office (CSO) for the current fiscal. Indian economy grew 7.2 per cent in 2017-18 fiscal.last_img read more

Rs 281 crore cash collection scam found in MP Tax officials

first_imgNEW DELHI: The raids conducted in Madhya Pradesh have revealed a “widespread” and “well-organised” racket involving unaccounted cash of Rs. 281 crore, the Income Tax department said in a statement on Monday.A portion of the cash had been transferred to the headquarters of “a major political party in Delhi”, and this included Rs. 20 crore moved through hawala (illegal transaction) channels from the residence of a senior functionary on Delhi’s Tughlak Road, it added. Income tax officials had raided the residences of Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Kamal Nath’s former private secretary Praveen Kakkar in Indore and former advisor Rajendra Kumar Miglani in Delhi in connection with an alleged hawala case on Sunday morning. The Income-Tax Department raids continued Monday with search teams making seizures of documents and cash, officials said. In another development, Police Monday seized Rs 8 crore in cash belonging to the BJP’s Telangana unit and alleged that the amount was withdrawn from a bank without following the Election Commission’s guidelines and due procedures.last_img read more

Buckeyes victorious against Illini despite nagging injuries

Freshman defensive lineman Joey Bosa (97) is looked at by the OSU training staff and coach Urban Meyer during a game against Illinois Nov. 16 at Memorial Stadium. OSU won, 60-35.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorIn football, much like any other sport, injuries are part of the game.For the No. 3 Ohio State Buckeyes (10-0, 8-0), Saturday was no exception, as at times had to play without their star quarterback and a stalwart offensive lineman during their 60-35 victory against Illinois (3-7, 0-6).OSU redshirt-senior offensive lineman Jack Mewhort made his 35th consecutive start in the win, but was taken out after senior wide receiver Corey “Philly” Brown hauled in an 11-yard touchdown pass from junior quarterback Braxton Miller, which gave the Buckeyes a 28-0 lead early in the second quarter.Coach Urban Meyer said after after the game that the plan was to get Mewhort out of the game if OSU “could get up on (Illinois)” early to rest his right knee, which he hurt in practice earlier in the week.“It’s devastating,” Meyer said, referring to when Mewhort, who he called OSU’s “best offensive player,” is not in the game. “It’s not that he’s a very good player, he’s the man. He’s the rally point, he’s the leader.”The OSU coach compared playing without Mewhort to losing senior safety Christian Bryant, who broke his ankle late in OSU’s 31-24 win against Wisconsin Sept. 28.“Not having him, it’s a little bit like C.B.,” Meyer said. “We’re still feeling the effects of having Christian Bryant out.”OSU beat the Illini without two other starters in sophomore linebacker Joshua Perry and junior linebacker Curtis Grant. Grant is recovering from an ankle injury sustained in the Buckeyes’ 56-0 win over Purdue Nov. 2 and Perry slipped on ice in the middle of last week and hit his head. The Buckeyes also lost starting freshman defensive lineman Joey Bosa to a sprained neck in the third quarter Saturday and had to turn to backup redshirt-senior quarterback Kenny Guiton at one point when Miller came out following a hard hit.“You’re playing with your third string middle linebacker … Your starting defensive end gets knocked out,” Meyer said. “We’re down 11 players for the year.”The lone usual starter at linebacker, junior Ryan Shazier, said playing without Grant and Perry changed the game a little bit.“It’s a little different because you’re so used to looking and just seeing one guy on the side of you or looking down and seeing that one guy there,” Shazier said. “But we practice with each other, we rotate all the time, so with those guys in I feel confident.”The players Shazier was referring to were sophomores Camren Williams and Joe Burger, who filled in for Perry and Grant.“We trust in Cam and Joe Burger just like Curtis and Josh,” Shazier said. “They just don’t have as much experience.”The 35 points the Buckeyes gave up were the most so far in 2013, and although one touchdown was scored on a punt return in the second quarter, Shazier said that does not matter.“I am not satisfied because I don’t want anybody to score any points on you, but 35 is way too much,” Shazier said. “Because if our offense wasn’t the offense that we are right now, this could have been a different situation, so we gave up too many points today.”Mewhort re-entered the lineup in the third quarter, and on a day where high winds wreaked havoc on the passing game, helped pave the way for both senior running back Carlos Hyde and Miller on the ground. OSU finished with 441 yards rushing on the day, compared to 132 for the Fighting Illini.“We went back to basics a little bit because the passing game wasn’t working as we thought,” Miller said. “We kind of get the ball out to Carlos or me, (and) we’ve got the best O-line in the Big Ten or country. Why not?”Miller only managed to complete 13 of his 29 pass attempts for 150 yards and two touchdowns against Illinois. His 44.8 completion percentage was his lowest of the season.The Buckeyes are scheduled to take on Indiana next Saturday in what will be their final home game of the season. Kickoff is set for 3:30 p.m. at Ohio Stadium. read more