Captain’s Cocktails Carnage

first_imgOne student questioned the wisdom of dispelling large numbers of very drunk students onto the streets. Kirsty Borthwick, Welfare Officer elect for Regent’s Park told Cherwell, “The organisers of such events do of course have the right to ask people to leave promptly at the end of the night, but they do also have a responsibility to their guests. Recent reports of attacks in the Cowley/Iffley area beg the question as to why guests, and in particular female students, were allowed to stagger away from the event, in the dark, drunk and vulnerable.”The Crown Committee stated, “As after every event, we will be reviewing the format for next year.  If we feel that the open bar format is no longer suitable, we will change it.”One student confirmed that nights involving unlimited alcohol result in some having a less than ideal evening. The attendee admitted, “I feel the cocktails defeated me: in future perhaps I should add the word “moderation” to my dictionary. It was absolute carnage. Apparently I was staggering around knocking into people and blowing a whistle at them. I then proceeded to lose all my belongings including my phone and ID, before falling into the paddling pool.”The struggling party goer then added,  “The following day I was so hungover I could barely see.” Some attendees claimed there were girls passed out beneath the scoreboard on the rugby pitch who were not found for a few hours.Celia Smith, the Female Welfare Officer at Hertford College, expressed her opinion that, “I’d say unlimited booze seems to lead to excessive drinking (many people simply getting value for money, if nothing else) so in practice it is a dangerous thing to allow. However, students should be taking responsibility for their own alcohol intake; I am less concerned by the provision of unlimited amounts of substance rather than the fact that lots of us often don’t exercise self-discipline over it.”The person for whom one of the ambulances was called reinforced Smith’s statement. They said, “The event was attended by adults who are responsible for the amount of alcohol they consume. At the ended of the day it is up to each individual to know their own limits.” The “Captain’s Cocktails” event, themed “Emergency Services”, required assistance from the real deal when an ambulance had to be called to the venue last Saturday. On the 19th the Oxford University Rugby Club hosted Captain’s Cocktails at the Iffley Sports Ground. The occasion ran from 6 — 11pm and promised unlimited cocktails for the night. Tickets were £10 in advance, or £15 on the door, and were distributed through colleges by various reps in the week preceding the event. Its Facebook event page advertised that there would be £5,000 of alcohol on the night. One attendee, who preferred not to be named, stated, “I was the person who had to use the emergency services on Saturday night but the incident wasn’t really alcohol related. I tripped off the curb and split my chin open; it was a result of my stupidity and a general lapse in concentration rather than being intoxicated.”A student from his college who wished to remain anonymous disputed this fact saying, “He seemed pretty wasted. It’s a big coincidence if, when you’re that drunk, your “trip and fall” (requiring an ambulance and numerous stitches) has nothing to do with the alcohol coursing through your veins.” The Crown Committee, who organised the event confirmed, “this year one ambulance was called to attend to a single individual who drank slightly too much.” They defended themselves, saying, “It is an open bar format, but in no way do we promote it as an “unlimited” drinking event, and the overwhelming majority of people attending are responsible in their intake of alcohol. In addition, we have put in place all the precautions necessary to ensure that the evening is safe and secure for all attendees.  The event ends promptly at 11pm, and everyone is quickly escorted off the premises.”One student questioned the wisdom of dispelling large numbers of very drunk students onto the streets. Kirsty Borthwick, Welfare Officer elect for Regent’s Park told Cherwell, “The organisers of such events do of course have the right to ask people to leave promptly at the end of the night, but they do also have a responsibility to their guests. Recent reports of attacks in the Cowley/Iffley area beg the question as to why guests, and in particular female students, were allowed to stagger away from the event, in the dark, drunk and vulnerable.”The Crown Committee stated, “As after every event, we will be reviewing the format for next year.  If we feel that the open bar format is no longer suitable, we will change it.”One student confirmed that nights involving unlimited alcohol result in some having a less than ideal evening. The attendee admitted, “I feel the cocktails defeated me: in future perhaps I should add the word “moderation” to my dictionary. It was absolute carnage. Apparently I was staggering around knocking into people and blowing a whistle at them. I then proceeded to lose all my belongings including my phone and ID, before falling into the paddling pool.” The struggling party goer then added,  “The following day I was so hungover I could barely see.” Some attendees claimed there were girls passed out beneath the scoreboard on the rugby pitch who were not found for a few hours.Celia Smith, the Female Welfare Officer at Hertford College, expressed her opinion that, “I’d say unlimited booze seems to lead to excessive drinking (many people simply getting value for money, if nothing else) so in practice it is a dangerous thing to allow. However, students should be taking responsibility for their own alcohol intake; I am less concerned by the provision of unlimited amounts of substance rather than the fact that lots of us often don’t exercise self-discipline over it.” The person for whom one of the ambulances was called reinforced Smith’s statement. They said, “The event was attended by adults who are responsible for the amount of alcohol they consume. At the ended of the day it is up to each individual to know their own limits.”The “Captain’s Cocktails” event, themed “Emergency Services”, required assistance from the real deal when an ambulance had to be called to the venue last Saturday. On the 19th the Oxford University Rugby Club hosted Captain’s Cocktails at the Iffley Sports Ground. The occasion ran from 6 — 11pm and promised unlimited cocktails for the night. Tickets were £10 in advance, or £15 on the door, and were distributed through colleges by various reps in the week preceding the event. Its Facebook event page advertised that there would be £5,000 of alcohol on the night. One attendee, who preferred not to be named, stated, “I was the person who had to use the emergency services on Saturday night but the incident wasn’t really alcohol related. I tripped off the curb and split my chin open; it was a result of my stupidity and a general lapse in concentration rather than being intoxicated.”A student from his college who wished to remain anonymous disputed this fact saying, “He seemed pretty wasted. It’s a big coincidence if, when you’re that drunk, your “trip and fall” (requiring an ambulance and numerous stitches) has nothing to do with the alcohol coursing through your veins.” The Crown Committee, who organised the event confirmed, “this year one ambulance was called to attend to a single individual who drank slightly too much.” They defended themselves, saying, “It is an open bar format, but in no way do we promote it as an “unlimited” drinking event, and the overwhelming majority of people attending are responsible in their intake of alcohol. In addition, we have put in place all the precautions necessary to ensure that the evening is safe and secure for all attendees.  The event ends promptly at 11pm, and everyone is quickly escorted off the premises.”last_img read more

Denne delivers as Briuns win in O.T.

first_imgSporting a big bullseye as the JCC of Bayonne Jr. Division Floor Hockey League’s only undefeated team, the (5-0) Bruins faced off against the second place (2-2) Red Wings. The Bruins got the action started as Christian Benson zip-lined a pass to Edward Denne who notched the game’s first goal. Down 1-0, the Red Wings cashed in on two fast break goals by AaliyanaCifuentes with David Matos and LouaiAsouti on the assists to put the Wingsup 2-1. Just before the halfway point in the bout, the Bruins tied things up at 2-all with another Denne goal. Roaring into the final twenty minutes, the Red Wings AaliyanaCifuentes rang up two more scoring gems to give the Wings a 4-2 advantage. Treading in unfamiliar waters the Bruins set their sights on battling back with Mariam Rasslan, Sebastian Echeverry, and Anthony Baez sureing up the defensive ranks. Needing to score in a hurry, the Bruins’ offense played “bombs away” unleashing blasts from every point leading to Edward Dennes’ third goal of the game narrowing the Red Wings’ lead to 4-3 with just 1:41 remaining. After two sliding stops by the Red Wings’ defenseman, Amir Asouti, the Bruins caught a break as Denne scored again to tie the game at 4-4 and force overtime. It took just one minute of O.T. for the Bruins’ Edward Denne to settle the deal but firing in his 5th goal and the game winner for a 5-4 Bruins’ victory.Week 4 Jr. DivisionOffensive Player of the Week: Edward Denne – BruinsDefense Player of the Week: Nathan Caballero – BruinsTeamwork/Leadership Player of the Week: Aaliyana Cifuentes – Red Wingslast_img read more

Detailed guide: PPE portal: how to order emergency personal protective equipment

first_imgThe PPE portal can be used by social care and primary care providers to get critical coronavirus (COVID-19) personal protective equipment (PPE).Providers who can use the service will receive an email invitation to register.The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has partnered with eBay, Clipper Logistics, Unipart Logistics and Royal Mail to develop this service.Who can use the portal 250 aprons 500 IIR masks 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) If you’re a provider in one of these categories, your invitation to register will be sent to your email account registered with Care Quality Commission (CQC), NHS Business Services Authority (BSA), NHS England or the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). This email will be from [email protected]ation about children’s social care providers is supplied to DHSC by the Department for Education.Steps to getting free PPE 24 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 1,500 IIR masks 4,000 gloves (2,000 pairs) Orthodontists that undertake between 3,000 and 5,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): You can only log in and place an order if you’ve received an email invitation to register. Domiciliary care providers with between 150 and 500 clients can order up to (per week): 400 FFP masks 400 FFP masks 200 visors 10,000 aprons 200 visors Residential care homes with between 25 and 49 beds can order up to (per week): 400 visors 400 visors 4,000 aprons 52,000 gloves (26,000 pairs) 200 gowns* 300 aprons 5 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 400 IIR masks 200 FFP masks* 800 aprons 3,200 gloves (1,600 pairs) 500 IIR masks 2,000 IIR masks 3,000 aprons 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors 300 IIR masks 2,800 gloves (1,400 pairs) 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 700 IIR masks 4,000 aprons If you are eligible, you’ll receive an email invite to the PPE portal. Register with the email address the invite was sent to Receive a link to confirm registration Click on the link and create your password Order your weekly COVID-19 PPE 200 FFP masks 400 visors 24 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 18,000 aprons 1,400 aprons GPs with between 11,000 and 29,999 patients can order up to (per week): 7 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Residential care homes with between 50 and 99 beds can order up to (per week): 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Orthodontists that annually undertake between 12,000 and 17,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 200 visors 5,000 gloves (2,500 pairs) 200 gowns* Dentists that annually undertake less than 3,000 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): Children’s care homes and secure homes: order limitsChildren’s care homes and secure homes that have fewer than 15 children’s places can order up to (per week): 200 gowns* 500 aprons 2,000 aprons 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Non-residential special schools with between 51 and 100 students can order up to (per week): 2 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors Community drug and alcohol services with between 501 and 1,000 clients can order up to (per week): 300 aprons Community drug and alcohol services with over 1,500 clients can order up to (per week): 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Domiciliary care providers with between 20 and 49 clients can order up to (per week): 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 2 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 200 FFP masks* 400 visors 4,000 IIR masks 200 FFP masks* 400 gowns 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 800 IIR masks 3,000 IIR masks 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) 200 gowns* 3,000 IIR masks 100 gowns 200 visors 600 gloves (300 pairs) 36,000 gloves (18,000 pairs) 200 gowns* Non-residential special schools (who do not conduct aerosol-generating procedures): order limitsNon-residential special schools with between 1 and 50 students can order up to (per week): 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 2,000 aprons Domiciliary care providers with between 500 and 999 clients can order up to (per week): 9,000 IIR masks 1,500 aprons Dentists that undertake between 3,000 and 5,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): Residential drug and alcohol services with 100 or more beds can order up to (per week): 5 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 100 FFP masks 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) 400 gowns 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 300 gowns GPs with between 5,000 and 7,999 patients can order up to (per week): 48 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 FFP masks* 600 gloves (300 pairs) 200 FFP masks* 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 200 visors 2,500 IIR masks 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) Orthodontists that annually undertake between 6,000 and 11,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) 200 FFP masks* 500 aprons 1,400 IIR masks 2,000 IIR masks 400 FFP masks Orthodontists that annually undertake between 18,000 and 23,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 300 aprons 400 visors 200 FFP masks* 800 IIR masks 500 aprons 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors 300 aprons When to use the portalEligible health and social care providers can use the portal to meet the extra need for PPE that has arisen as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic.You should not use the portal to order PPE for non-COVID-19 requirements. You should get this through your normal channels.Help with using the portalCall the customer service team on 0800 876 6802 if you have any questions about using the PPE portal, including, for example: 400 gloves (200 pairs) Orthodontists that undertake 36,000 or more of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 200 visors 400 visors 200 IIR masks 8,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) 20,000 gloves (10,000 pairs) 250 aprons 7,000 aprons 14,000 gloves (7,000 pairs) 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 200 FFP masks* 1,000 aprons 200 visors Dentists that annually undertake between 24,000 and 29,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 18,000 gloves (9,000 pairs) 400 FFP masks 400 gowns 400 IIR masks Orthodontists that annually undertake between 30,000 and 35,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 300 gowns The PPE portal can be used by: Pharmacies with between 10 and 14 staff can order up to (per week): 100 IIR masks 100 aprons 200 gloves (100 pairs) 200 visors 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 8,000 gloves (4,000 pairs) Residential drug and alcohol services with between 10 and 24 beds can order up to (per week): 200 IIR masks 200 IIR masks 250 aprons 400 gloves (200 pairs) 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors Dentists should calculate their number of units of dental activity (UDAs) plus (number of units of orthodontic activity (UOAs), if any, multiplied by 1.5) per practice per year.For example, a practice that carries out 2,000 UDAs and 1,000 UOAs per year should report 2,000 plus (1,000 multiplied by 1.5) to get a composite metric of 3,500. 1,000 visors 50 IIR masks 3,000 aprons 1,400 gloves (700 pairs) 800 gloves (400 pairs) 2,000 IIR masks 1,000 visors Domiciliary care providers with more than 1,000 clients can order up to (per week): 300 aprons Community drug and alcohol services with between 101 and 500 clients can order up to (per week): 18 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 2 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 18,000 IIR masks 200 gloves (100 pairs) 3,000 aprons 600 gloves (300 pairs) 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 2,000 visors 200 visors 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 IIR masks 250 aprons 400 gloves (200 pairs) 200 visors 36 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 10,000 gloves (5,000 pairs) 26,000 IIR masks 400 IIR masks 300 aprons 600 gloves (300 pairs) 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 600 gloves (300 pairs) 1,000 gowns 200 visors 400 visors 200 gowns* 2 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 700 IIR masks 200 visors Non-residential special schools with between 51 and 100 students can order up to (per week): 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 500 aprons 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Community drug and alcohol services with between 1,001 and 1,500 clients can order up to (per week): Optometrists: order limitsOptometrists that carry out fewer than 5 sight tests daily can order up to (per week): 200 visors How to order PPE using the PPE portal 200 FFP masks* 4,000 IIR masks 200 gowns* 400 gowns 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors 4 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 400 IIR masks Dentists: order limits 200 FFP masks 400 visors 300 IIR masks 400 IIR masks 200 FFP masks PPE is delivered directly to the address supplied to us 250 aprons 1,500 aprons 2,500 IIR masks 200 FFP masks 400 gowns 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 8,000 gloves (4,000 pairs) Optometrists that carry out between 5 and 9 sight tests daily can order up to (per week): 200 gowns* 200 visors 3 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 600 aprons 200 IIR masks 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Residential care homes with 100 or more beds can order up to (per week): 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 600 FFP masks 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 4,400 gloves (2,200 pairs) GPs with 30,000 patients or more can order up to (per week): Non-residential special schools with between 101 and 400 students can order up to (per week): 9,000 aprons Orthodontists: order limits 3,000 aprons Orthodontists that annually undertake less than 3,000 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 500 IIR masks Dentists that annually undertake between 30,000 and 35,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 300 aprons 200 visors 1,000 IIR masks 300 gowns 10,000 IIR masks 200 gowns* Optometrists that carry out between 15 and 29 sight tests daily can order up to (per week): 1 box of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 300 aprons Children’s care homes and secure homes that have more than 15 children’s places can order up to (per week): 200 visors Non-residential special schools with over 400 students can order up to (per week): 400 gowns Non-residential special schools (who conduct aerosol-generating procedures): order limitsItems marked with an asterisk (*) are available exclusively to providers that carry out aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs). If you carry out AGPs but do not have access to these items on the portal, please contact 0800 876 6802.Non-residential special schools with between 1 and 50 students can order up to (per week): 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 500 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 10,000 gloves (5,000 pairs) 300 gowns 200 FFP masks* 100 IIR masks 100 aprons 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 400 visors 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 300 FFP masks* 300 gowns* 800 IIR masks 2,000 aprons 2,800 gloves (1,400 pairs) 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors 200 visors Non-residential special schools with over 400 students can order up to (per week): 1,000 aprons 1,600 visors Residential special schools: order limitsAll residential special schools can order up to (per week): 1,000 aprons 1,000 IIR masks 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 250 aprons 4,000 IIR masks 400 FFP masks Residential drug and alcohol services: order limitsResidential drug and alcohol services with fewer than 10 beds can order up to (per week): 200 visors 500 IIR masks Orthodontists that annually undertake between 24,000 and 29,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 FFP masks Pharmacies: order limitsPharmacies with fewer than 5 staff can order up to (per week): Non-residential special schools with between 101 and 400 students can order up to (per week): 400 visors 2,000 IIR masks 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) 200 IIR masks 250 aprons 400 gloves (200 pairs) 2 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 200 gowns* 300 aprons 200 gowns* 8,000 gloves (4,000 pairs) 700 IIR masks 7,000 IIR masks 200 gowns* 1,600 IIR masks 1,000 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors Dentists that annually undertake between 6,000 and 11,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 400 gowns 300 aprons 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 100 IIR masks Dentists that annually undertake between 18,000 and 23,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 400 visors 50 IIR masks 100 aprons 400 gloves (200 pairs) 200 visors 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 FFP masks* 200 gowns* 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 300 gowns 300 FFP masks 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) Dentists that annually undertake between 12,000 and 17,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 300 FFP masks 400 gowns 400 gloves (200 pairs) 400 FFP masks 400 aprons Residential care homes with between 10 and 24 beds can order up to (per week): 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 300 IIR masks 500 aprons 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 3,000 visors 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) problems with registering problems with ordering if you believe you are eligible but have not been invited 400 FFP masks 3,000 aprons 800 IIR masks 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) GPs with between 8,000 and 10,999 patients can order up to (per week): 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Optometrists that carry out 30 or more sight tests daily can order up to (per week): GPs residential social care providers domiciliary social care providers pharmacies dentists orthodontists optometrists children’s care homes and secure homes all special schools and special post-16 institutes community drug and alcohol services residential drug and alcohol services 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 600 visors Community drug and alcohol services: order limitsCommunity drug and alcohol services with fewer than 100 clients can order up to (per week): 400 FFP masks 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 1,300 IIR masks 5,000 IIR masks 400 gloves (200 pairs) 2,000 aprons 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 50 IIR masks 100 aprons 200 gloves (100 pairs) 200 visors 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Dentists that undertake 36,000 or more of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 50 IIR masks 100 aprons 200 gloves (100 pairs) 200 visors 1 bottle of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 200 visors 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 200 IIR masks 250 aprons 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) The team is available from 7am to 7pm, 7 days a week to help resolve queries.We may need to contact the Care Quality Commission (CQC), NHS Business Services Authority (BSA), NHS England or the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to help resolve queries.Order limitsThe current order limits for different types and sizes of eligible health and social care providers are listed below.We’ll keep order limits under review to make sure these are based on the latest available public health guidance, COVID-19 trends, PPE requirements modelling and analysis, and provider feedback.GPs: order limitsGPs with fewer than 5,000 patients can order up to (per week): 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Orthodontists should calculate their number of units of orthodontic activity (UOAs) plus (number of units of dental activity (ODAs), if any, multiplied by 0.66) per practice per year.For example, a practice that undertakes 2,000 UOAs and 1,500 UDAs per year should report 2,000 plus (1,500 multiplied by 0.66) to get a composite metric of 2,990. 250 aprons 50 IIR masks 100 aprons 200 gloves (100 pairs) 200 visors 1 bottle of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 100 FFP masks* 100 gowns* 1,000 IIR masks 300 IIR masks 1,300 aprons 500 IIR masks 1,000 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 4,000 gloves (2,000 pairs) 200 IIR masks 250 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 600 visors 36 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 600 FFP masks* 600 gowns* 700 aprons Pharmacies with 15 or more staff can order up to (per week): Residential drug and alcohol services with between 25 and 49 beds can order up to (per week): 26,000 aprons 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 4,000 visors 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 FFP masks* 24 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Domiciliary care providers with between 100 and 149 clients can order up to (per week): 200 FFP masks* Optometrists that carry out between 10 and 14 sight tests daily can order up to (per week): 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Residential care homes: order limitsItems marked with an asterisk (*) are available to providers that carry out aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs). If you carry out AGPs but do not have access to these items on the portal, please contact 0800 876 6802.Residential care homes with fewer than 10 beds can order up to (per week): 500 aprons 200 IIR masks Domiciliary care providers: order limitsItems marked with an asterisk (*) are available to providers that carry out aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs). If you carry out AGPs but do not have access to these items on the portal, please contact 0800 876 6802.Domiciliary care providers with fewer than 20 clients can order up to (per week): Pharmacies with between 5 and 9 staff can order up to (per week): 600 gowns Domiciliary care providers with between 50 and 99 clients can order up to (per week): 400 IIR masks 800 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 500 visors 200 visors Residential drug and alcohol services with between 50 and 99 beds can order up to (per week): 1,400 gloves (700 pairs) 400 gloves (200 pairs) 300 gowns Delivery times and costPPE ordered from the portal is free of charge.Orders will be delivered by Royal Mail within 5 days.Some orders will require more than one box and may be received as multiple deliveries. PPE standardsAll PPE offered on the portal meets UK government quality standards.You can find more information on PPE standards at Public Health England’s COVID-19 PPE hub and NHS guidance on supply and use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and other supplies.When to use local resilience forumsYou can now get all the COVID-19 PPE you need from the PPE portal.However, PPE from local resilience forums (LRFs) can be made available on the basis of clinical need, for example a demonstrable spike in local COVID-19 cases or temporary difficulties in accessing other distribution channels.All other adult social care services not supplied by the PPE portal will be able to access PPE through their LRFs or local authorities, depending on local arrangements.Other providers who are not invited to use the portal should continue using their LRFs if they cannot get the PPE they need through wholesaler routes.For business-as-usual and non-clinical grade PPE needs all providers should continue accessing their normal supply routes.Contact usCall the customer service team on 0800 876 6802 if you have any questions about using the PPE portal.The team is available from 7am to 7pm, 7 days a week, to help resolve your queries.last_img read more

Notre Dame hosts annual Energy Week

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Anne Pillai South Bend mayor Pete Buttigieg, left and Carmel, Indiana, mayor James Brainard speak at an event about designing smart cities during last year’s Energy Week. This year’s Energy Week started Monday.Anne Berges Pillai, education and outreach associate program director at ND Energy and one of the organizers of Energy Week, said one of the week’s major goals is to spread knowledge about energy and related issues to students and parts of campus who may not otherwise be exposed to the topic.“We definitely want to get as many people engaged as we can,” she said. “This year especially, we have a lot of topics that are related a lot to policy to try and engage parts of campus that maybe haven’t really thought about energy that much before.”In keeping with this goal, the events constituting Energy Week will engage a diverse number of energy related topics. For instance, there will be a lecture delivered by a guest speaker from Kodiak, Alaska, one of only five places in the United States which uses nearly 100 percent renewable electricity. There will also be a guest speaker from Puerto Rico, as well as a showing of a documentary on Hurricane Maria. Both events are meant to examine the power situation on the island.It’s important to be informed about energy and how it works, especially considering that many important energy decisions take place on a local, rather than federal level, Pillai said. This issue was at the center of a talk hosted during last year’s Energy Week between South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Mayor James Brainard from Carmel, Ind.Breanna Belz, a junior on the student energy board, said Energy Week programming has a wide focus. “Of course we have a lot of people from the College of Science and Engineering who deliver lots of technical talks about different forms of energy, but then we also have a lot of people from the College of Business that are big names and that a lot of our students know who talk more on the policy side and the business side,” Belz said. “Like how can these different methods of energy generation succeed? It’s not all about the science, a lot of it is implementation, politics, companies and money.”While many of the events and topics will be especially relevant to students studying energy, sustainability, business and economics, energy is a topic that affects everyone and one that everyone should be informed about, Pillai explained.“We have been reaching out and trying to convince everyone that they can play a role, either as an intelligent citizen who knows about the issues or by doing what they can in their own home,” she said. “It’s a personal responsibility thing, it doesn’t matter what your major is.”Tags: Energy Week, sustainability, Sustainable energy This week marks the beginning of the 12th ND Energy Week, a series of talks and events meant to raise awareness about energy and sustainability across campus.These events will include lectures from both Notre Dame professors and guest speakers, tours of power facilities and documentaries and interactive talks about what it’s like to work in the energy sector. All events are designed to inform students from all majors about different kinds of energy as well as the business and policies that surround energy and sustainability. last_img read more

Outdoor Updates: Man accused of threatening hikers along the Appalachian Trail

first_imgWest Virginia environmental regulators cancel public pipeline permit hearing over “security concerns,” then quietly issue the permit A man accused of threatening hikers along the Appalachian Trail has been arrested. Thirty-year-old James Jordan of Massachusetts, who goes by the name of “Sovereign,” was arrested in Unicoi County, Tennessee. He was carrying a large knife and is charged with possession of schedule six drugs, drug paraphernalia, and criminal impersonation. Jordan allegedly threatened hikers at a shelter along the Appalachian Trail and chased people with a shovel. He is also suspected in an assault on a juvenile along the Appalachian Trail. Unicoi County Sheriff Mike Hensley told WJHK News Channel 11 that Jordan was causing problems in Greene County and Madison County as well as in Unicoi County. Jordan is currently being held on $25,000 bond at the Unicoi County jail. The NHL will offset the airline emissions generated by players during the Stanley Cup Man accused of threatening hikers along the Appalachian Trail center_img Is the National Hockey League going green? The NHL recently announced that they would purchase carbon credits to offset the greenhouse gases produced by flying NHL hockey teams to the first round of the Stanley Cup playoffs, currently underway. The NHL says that they will purchase credits to offset more than 465 metric tons of carbon emissions, which is the equivalent to taking 99 cars off of the road for one year. The NHL also publishes an annual Sustainability Report. Last year the report found that, due to climate change, the average length of the skating season may be shortened by one third in eastern Canada and by 20 percent in western Canada in the coming years. The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) scheduled a public hearing for a pipeline permit in Jefferson County but canceled the meeting a week before it was scheduled to take place on February 21, citing security concerns. Residents had called for a public meeting to express their questions and concerns over a 4.85-mile natural gas pipeline, which would deliver gas to Rockwool, a coal and gas manufacturing plant currently under construction in the city of Ranson. Residents asked for the meeting to be rescheduled but on March 29 the WVDEP issued the permit without holding the meeting. In an email to the West Virginia Gazette Mail the WVDEP said that public hearings are not required under the State General Water Pollution Control Permit. last_img read more

Chilean General Tours U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

first_img The commandant of the Chilean Education and Doctrine Command spent some time with his American counterparts at U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command to meet with leaders and learn more about the command during a visit July 24 through 26. Lt. Gen. Bosco Pesse’s visit was part of a larger tour, which included time at the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation at Fort Benning, Georgia, and a visit to the Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. During the two-day visit, Lt. Gen. Pesse received an overview of the command from Lt. Gen. David Halverson, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s deputy commanding general, and toured several facilities, including Initial Military Training, the Training Brain Operation Center and the Army Training Support Center. Pesse said the visit was very helpful and provided an opportunity to look at many different options for training and processes, which, in turn, could be helpful to the Chilean army during its time of transformation, a modernization that has taken place throughout the last 15 years. “We are living in a very uncertain world, and we need leaders that are adaptable, that are flexible, that can make good decisions…” he said. “And because of this uncertainty, there aren’t any recipes [for leadership]; it’s not in the book.” He noted that regardless of the army, there are things that must always be taken into account, such as core values like discipline, loyalty and teamwork. “We call it ‘cimientos’, when you start building the structure; the foundation,” Pesse said. In addition to discussing processes and exchanging ideas, the general said the visit also provided something much more valuable: strengthening the partnership between the U.S. and Chile. “To extend our partnership and strong relations that we have kept with the United States, particularly with the United States Army, for many years — I think that’s probably the most important thing,” he said. Pesse said all the people he met throughout his visit were very helpful and supportive, and he appreciated the open dialogue; however, one of the things that stood out most was the Army’s regard for its Soldiers. “One of the things that I really got a strong feeling about during my visit here — and at Benning — is the caring about people,” he mentioned. “That’s something I think motivates and helps morale and the respect for everybody.” This visit is one of several ongoing initiatives between the two countries. Past U.S. visitors to Chile include Maj. Gen. Simeon G. Trombitas, the Army South commanding general, and Joseph Westphal, the undersecretary of the Army. Chile and the U.S. also participate in a number of exchange programs with West Point, the Army War College, WHINSEC and Captains Career Courses. By Dialogo August 03, 2012last_img read more

Bicyclist Hit, Killed by State Parks Vehicle

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A bicyclist died after being hit by a New York State parks vehicle at Heckscher State Park in East Islip over the weekend, authorities said.The collision occurred where a bicycle path meets the main park roadway near parking field 2 at 10:41 a.m. Friday, State Park Police said.The victim was taken to Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, where the biker was pronounced dead. The victim’s name was not immediately released.The New York State Police accident reconstruction unit is assisting in the continuing investigation.State Park Police ask that anyone with information about this to case call them at 631-321-3700. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

Popping the consumer debt bubble before it bursts

first_imgWhen it comes to the record growth of consumer debt, many questions come to mind. What do we know? What can history teach us? What should a credit union do to keep their members safe? According to Federal Reserve data, total U.S. credit card debt has reached $1 trillion, surpassing a previous mark set in April of 2008 just before the Great Recession. For households that carry credit card debt, the average amount per household is now $9,600, which equals 17 percent of an average U.S. household income. The average interest rate on a credit card is 16 percent, and about 24 percent for those with subpar credit, that debt grows between $1,600 and $2,300 each year. Yet, despite growing household debt at potentially increasing interest rates, most Americans appear to be optimistic about the future due to the stable economy and low unemployment. Unfortunately, all it takes is one major set-back in the way of a job loss or major medical situation to turn the tide and create problems for consumers with high credit card debt.What opportunity does this pose to credit unions?Education, financial literacy and debt management is paramount and credit unions are perfectly positioned to provide this to their members. While it is important to continually offer guidance about how to use credit cards, credit unions can make a bigger impact for their members by taking a more member-centric approach. By offering a parachute for members in times of hardship, credit unions will create a huge differentiation in the marketplace. continue reading » 23SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

How to get through uncertainty

first_imgThis is placeholder text continue reading » We’re now in the fourth quarter of 2020. As we reflect on the year, where we – and our organizations – are now is likely lightyears away from where we thought we would be in January. The coronavirus pandemic made our initial annual plans irrelevant, dramatically changed our business operations, and is continuing to alter our plans for the future.Add to that environment a fast-approaching, contentious presidential election and we’ve got a lot of uncertainty.Uncertainty weighs heavy on all of us. It’s hard to know what to do next when circumstances are changing so quickly. Axios Future writer Bryan Walsh acknowledges that people “are a future-focused species that feels happiest when we think we can plan for and shape our tomorrow. Take that away, and the result can be crippling anxiety.”To help overcome the stress of uncertainty, Walsh has a “guide” using strategic foresight, which requires us to plan for several possible futures and outcomes. I’ve previously shared a similar sentiment, encouraging fellow leaders to build “What if?” agendas that challenge assumptions, leave you prepared to handle worst-case scenarios, and encourage innovation. This post is currently collecting data…center_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Ryan Hall returns to Super League with Hull Kingston Rovers | Rugby League News

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